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Hammer Museum

ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Jori Finkel and Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
When the Los Angeles County Museum of Art under director Michael Govan proposed taking over L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art in 2008, the art world rallied against it before MOCA turned it down. But reaction has been different to this week's news that LACMA has made another offer, this one at the behest of some MOCA leaders. One reason for the zeitgeist shift is the popularity of Govan, who has overseen an ambitious expansion of the LACMA campus and its art collection since his arrival in 2006.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013
Llyn Foulkes is a crank. That's a good thing, because we need cranks. We might not want to sit next to one on the subway or listen to one give a floor speech in Congress. But popular culture and institutional art have a way of smoothing out or even debasing life's often painful rawness. Works of art offer contemplative distance, which can make zealous eccentricity especially riveting — illustrated in this retrospective of the painter-musician. Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. Through May 19. hammer.ucla.edu .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Llyn Foulkes is a crank. That's a good thing, because we need cranks. I might not want to sit next to one on the subway or listen to one give a floor-speech in Congress. But popular culture and institutional art have a way of smoothing out or even debasing life's often painful rawness. Works of art offer contemplative distance, which can make zealous eccentricity especially riveting. Take "The Corporate Kiss" (2001), a bracing bit of strangeness that is on view in the sprawling, 50-year retrospective exhibition of Foulkes' art newly opened at the UCLA Hammer Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
This story has been corrected. Please see note below. "The Virgin and Child With Saint Anne," a highly prized painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the collection of the Louvre, is having a big year. Last spring, the sensitive portrayal of St. Anne with her daughter and grandson was the keystone of an exhibition at the Parisian museum. For the first time, Leonardo's "final masterpiece" - in process for years and left unfinished at the artist's death in 1519 - was exhibited with his compositional sketches, preparatory drawings and landscape studies, along with related works by other artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By David Ng
Modern-dance choreographer Trisha Brown, who announced her retirement from creating new work last month, will bring her renowned company to Los Angeles for a series of performances at multiple venues, including the Getty Museum and the Hammer Museum, starting in late March. "Trisha Brown Dance Company: The Retrospective Project" is organized by the Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA.  The New York dance company will begin on March 30 with Brown's installation work "Floor of the Forest," with performances several times daily on Thursdays through Sundays in the Hammer Museum courtyard.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By David Ng
"Three Weeks in May," the famous 1977 work by artist-activist Suzanne Lacy that mapped rape cases across Southern California, will now have a permanent home at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. The Hammer said Wednesday it has acquired the piece, which Lacy created with artist Leslie Labowitz over a three-week period in 1977 near L.A.'s City Hall. The museum said the piece was purchased through its acquisition fund. Lacy created "Three Weeks in May" to raise awareness of rape cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2012 | By Ellen Olivier
A veritable A-list of artists, actors, fashion designers and business leaders  streamed into the Hammer Museum in Westwood Saturday to celebrate artists Barbara Kruger and Cindy Sherman, raising a record $2 million for the museum's exhibitions and programs. MSNBC's Rachel Maddow and actor/author/musician Steve Martin delivered the night's tributes. As if their talks weren't entertaining enough, the finale came courtesy of Katy Perry, who has a busy week in store with performances planned at Sunday's fundraiser for President Obama   and at  Thursday's amfAR Inspiration Gala.
HEALTH
September 29, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
Every Thursday at lunchtime at the Hammer Museum in Westwood, several dozen people turn off their cellphones and take seats in the bright pink chairs of the Billy Wilder Theater. They come to spend half an hour with Diana Winston, a former Buddhist nun and one of the nation's best-known teachers of mindfulness meditation. The lights go down, and Winston takes a seat in an office chair and speaks quietly into a microphone. Occasionally she is accompanied by Michael Perricone playing about 20 Tibetan bells, the haunting, wave-like sounds enhancing her voice, which is so soothing it's as if she were born to the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
There seems to be an unwritten rule that Los Angeles arts organizations can't have an awards ceremony or fundraising gala without a featured pop music star. Katy Perry is poised to sing at the Hammer Museum's annual gala on Oct. 6, and Florence and the Machine will help the Los Angeles County Museum of Art celebrate at its Art + Film Gala on Oct. 27. Now add Moby and Tom Morello to the list. Morello, who stoked the left wing political broadsides of the rock band Rage Against the Machine with his innovative electric guitar playing, will be both an honoree and the entertainment for the Center for the Study of Political Graphics' annual party and silent auction Oct. 21 at Professional Musicians Local 47 in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Gustave Moreau's painting of Salomé dancing before Herod is one of those rare episodes in narrative art when subject, style and material come together so seamlessly that two things happen: A viewer is transfixed and a moment in time is crystallized. The extravagant 1876 canvas, which took the artist seven years to complete, is one of the stars of the UCLA Hammer Museum's small permanent collection of Old Master and 19th century paintings and sculptures. Now it is the subject of a modest but absorbing show there - a deep dive into a singular masterpiece.
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