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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
What Thomas Wolfe meant, obviously, is that you can't go home again and stay. You can always go home again on a visit, squinting at passers-by in the hope of sighting a familiar face, searching amid the changes for any surviving traces of your past, feeling at last, it may be, only like a stranger in a strangely familiar yet foreign land.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
What Thomas Wolfe meant, obviously, is that you can't go home again and stay. You can always go home again on a visit, squinting at passers-by in the hope of sighting a familiar face, searching amid the changes for any surviving traces of your past, feeling at last, it may be, only like a stranger in a strangely familiar yet foreign land.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1985
Charles H. Colvin, an early aeronautics industry figure who designed and installed some of the instrumentation and gauges in Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis, is dead at age 92. Colvin, who two years after Lindbergh's 1927 solo flight across the Atlantic sold his Pioneer Instruments Co. to the Bendix Corp., died earlier this month at a hospital near his retirement home in Ojai. He was born in Sterling, Mass., educated at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J.
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--Getting married costs less than adoption, so Debbie Davis, 28, decided it was just plain good business sense to tie the knot with an 83-year-old blind man. Davis, of Hammondsport, N.Y., married Theodore Collins for the same reason that her mother, Jane MacIntosh, 51, married 72-year-old amputee John Coughlin in December--to keep them in the family and beat the system.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1987 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Two former Seagram Co. executives with long experience in the wine business agreed Tuesday to buy most of Seagram's U.S. wine operations--including Paul Masson and Taylor California Cellars--for $200 million in cash. The deal, rumored for weeks, is expected to close in April. The buyers, whose firm is known as Vintners International, also will acquire Seagram's Taylor New York, Great Western and Gold Seal Wines operations in upstate New York. Heading Vintners International are Paul M.
FOOD
October 20, 1988 | DAN BERGER, Times Wine Writer
A series of news notes from the wine industry. . . . Freemark Abbey Winery in the Napa Valley has released its first new vineyard-designated wine in 14 years with the release of a Cabernet Sauvignon from the Sycamore Vineyard. The vineyard, owned by John Bryan of Piedmont, Calif., is located adjacent to the Bella Oaks Vineyard in Rutherford.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1985 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Despite the best efforts of Charles Schulz and UNICEF to give it a good name, Halloween has become a dreadful and corrupted event, and I will gladly entertain a motion to have it abolished. It is our annual celebration of extortion, greed and mean-spirited prankery, only slightly redeemed by the imagination that goes into the homemade get-ups and the innocent glee with which the small fry seize enough sweets to rot their teeth forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2006 | Clancy Sigal, Special to The Times
LONGTIME readers of the Los Angeles Times will fondly recall arts editor and film critic Charles Champlin, who for 26 years was one of this newspaper's four long-running columnists under Otis Chandler's innovative reign as publisher. Together with writers Jack Smith, Jim Murray, Art Seidenbaum and cartoonist Paul Conrad, Champlin helped keep nervous readers loyal when the paper broke with its stuffy, provincial past and transformed itself into a major national daily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1999 | ANN SHIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The topics will include writing, editing and more when Charles Champlin, retired entertainment editor and film critic for the Los Angeles Times, visits the Ventura County Writers Club this week. Champlin--who teaches, lectures and writes when he isn't visiting the Carpinteria condo he described as so small the mice are hunchbacked--is 30,000 words into a memoir that picks up where his previous memoir, "Back Where the Past Was," concluded.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1986 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The siren on the old firehouse next to the drugstore used to blow every day at noon. If you stood right under you felt it was going to leave you deaf, and shake your teeth loose as well. In the summers when we were very young, it was the subject of a dare. The small fry would run downtown to watch Chris Fogarty open the box and push the red button that set the siren going. Chris must have worked for the village; the Fire Department was volunteer then, as it still is.
BOOKS
June 18, 1989 | Thomas Cahill, Cahill was for 12 years editor and publisher of the Cahill & Co. Reader's Catalogue. and
The best prescription for a happy childhood is a bad memory, Charles Champlin remembers someone saying. And when we consider 20th-Century fiction, all the Joyces and Lawrences and Wolfes, it is sometimes hard to bear in mind that countless human beings remember their childhoods precisely and fondly, sometimes even as the best part of their lives. Perhaps it is true, as Pound remarked, that hatred, rather than love, is more often the driving force of literature. Perhaps contented souls are less tempted to take up their pens.
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