Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHanae Mori
IN THE NEWS

Hanae Mori

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 14, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Valley girl is shaking up one of Japan's most tradition-bound fashion houses. She is Pamela Mori, the daughter-in-law of preeminent designer Hanae Mori. As the newly named creative director of Hanae Mori's ready-to-wear line, Pamela Mori--who left California shortly after graduating from Chatsworth High in 1975--is slowly, very slowly, ushering in a more youthful look to extend the designer's appeal beyond society women and royalty.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 14, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Valley girl is shaking up one of Japan's most tradition-bound fashion houses. She is Pamela Mori, the daughter-in-law of preeminent designer Hanae Mori. As the newly named creative director of Hanae Mori's ready-to-wear line, Pamela Mori--who left California shortly after graduating from Chatsworth High in 1975--is slowly, very slowly, ushering in a more youthful look to extend the designer's appeal beyond society women and royalty.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | MARY ROURKE, Times Staff Writer
They call her Madame. Even her son, Kei, refers to Hanae Mori that way--although she's sitting right across from him. Madame Hanae Mori; the title goes with the territory. Now in her mid-60s, she is more than just the honored ancestor of Japanese fashion designers, more than the first Asian designer to open a salon on Avenue Montaigne--the famed couture row of Paris. Her name goes on the letterhead of a half-billion-dollar empire. And fashion is only part of it.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | MARY ROURKE, Times Staff Writer
They call her Madame. Even her son, Kei, refers to Hanae Mori that way--although she's sitting right across from him. Madame Hanae Mori; the title goes with the territory. Now in her mid-60s, she is more than just the honored ancestor of Japanese fashion designers, more than the first Asian designer to open a salon on Avenue Montaigne--the famed couture row of Paris. Her name goes on the letterhead of a half-billion-dollar empire. And fashion is only part of it.
NEWS
August 9, 1985
There may be more Chanels in the audience than on the runway when the House of Chanel in Paris introduces Coco perfume and unveils its 60-piece fall couture collection Sept. 16 at the Music Center. As for the party theme, it's definitely turning out to be: Dress Chanel. For starters, benefit chairwoman Nancy Vreeland will be swathed in Chanel, although she isn't sure which Chanel; the couture house is bringing over three gowns from the new collection from which she'll make her selection.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | BETTY GOODWIN
The pretty people went all out dressing up for Barbara Davis' Carousel Ball for diabetes charities on Friday night. Vaults were cleared out for the evening--make that jewelry vaults, not fur. And, for a change, Los Angeles women abandoned their beloved rhinestones, sequins and beads for gowns of satin, chiffon and velvet. The big exceptions were the tiny rhinestone-encrusted handbags with four-figure price tags designed by Judith Leiber and clutched by nearly all.
TRAVEL
September 7, 1986 | JENNIFER MERIN, Merin is a New York City free-lance writer.
The traditional kimono and obi will probably always symbolize Japan and Japanese style, but contemporary Japanese fashion designers have taken an avant-garde position in international couture. When designers Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto, Rei Kawakubo and others began showing their fashions in Europe about six years ago, they created a sensation. Their clothes were new and very different.
NEWS
October 23, 1995 | BRIDGET BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A chorus of children in multinational costumes sang "It's a Small World" between the speeches at the Noel Foundation awards dinner Friday night--appropriate for the highly diverse crowd in the Beverly Hilton's ballroom. Media mogul Rupert Murdoch, fashion designer Hanae Mori, Deputy Dist. Atty.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
When Italy's Gianfranco Ferre showed his first collection for the French house of Christian Dior last summer, critics accused him of trying too hard and straying toward prissiness. But his Monday show of spring and summer designs, his first ready-to-wear collection for Dior, was more relaxed. There were plenty of flexible separates--smart city pants, shorts, skirts, flouncy chiffon chemises and tight jackets in black, white, gray, periwinkle blue, red, violet and vibrant yellow.
IMAGE
April 20, 2008 | Melissa Magsaysay, Times Staff Writer
The SPRING COLLECTIONS were so full of trembling blossoms and tropical blooms, the runways were like Impressionist galleries in motion. These were the masterpieces of the season -- floral prints without hard edges, saturated with color, in soft, fluid shapes.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER COOK
Fall, 1990, men's wear shown here this spring brought together the talents of the top names in Japanese fashion--Issey Miyake, Hanae Mori, Kansai Yamamoto, the Koshino sisters (Junko and Hiroko), Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Garcons. Close behind these stars were the up-and-comers: Kensho Abe, Norihisa Ota, Kyoko Higa and Yoshiyuki Konishi who, unlike the others, do not show their collections in Paris.
NEWS
June 4, 2008 | Ginny Chien, Special to The Times
SHELVE THE Vogues and put away the Harper's Bazaars. Turns out vintage Montgomery Ward catalogs are the fashion bibles of choice for two of the small screen's most clothing-conscious dramas. Television's retro style resurgence started with "Mad Men" costume designer Katherine Jane Bryant's pitch-perfect interpretation of fashion circa 1960 -- all elegance and corseted waists for the ladies; tailoring and skinny lapels for the gents.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|