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Hand Sanitizer

HEALTH
September 13, 2004 | By Ronald D. White
Silvia Cordero eyed the row of disinfecting gels, soaps and hand sanitizers at a Rite Aid in Culver City with the intensity of a drill sergeant preparing troops for a skirmish with the H1N1 flu virus. "They're going in my car, in my desk at work and in my sons' backpacks," the 28-year-old said. "I don't really like the way any of them feel on my skin, but they might help keep us healthy." Concerns about the contagiousness and severity of the H1N1 flu strain have generated a boom in the hand-sanitizer market.
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NEWS
September 13, 2010
Spoiler alert: If the presence of all those alcohol-based hand sanitizers makes you feel safe from disease, skip this blog post. The sanitizers – Purell, Germ-X and the like – started popping up everywhere last year following the outbreak of the H1N1 “swine flu” virus . But new research out of the University of Virginia finds that they¬† are of no particular use in warding off the flu. They also failed to ward...
IMAGE
March 8, 2009 | Adam Tschorn
On the subways of Milan, Paris and New York, a telltale sign that you're in the company of an honest-to-goodness male model -- besides his impossibly good looks -- is the ubiquitous backpack. Never a briefcase or a rolling bag, it's usually a soft-sided athletic number a little larger than a car battery, with two straps, one of which is slung ever so casually over a shoulder.
TRAVEL
October 22, 2006 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
TWO recent studies confirm travelers' worst suspicions: Airplanes and hotel rooms are fertile grounds for spreading cold and flu bugs. Harvard scientists confirmed that flu is spread on planes in a study released last month. Researchers found that the decline in air travel after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks delayed the onset of the 2001-02 flu season in the United States.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The robot, sitting quietly in a corner, suddenly hums to life and rolls down the hospital corridor on three wheels. Perched atop the sleek machine is a monitor showing the smiling face of Dr. Paul Vespa, the physician who's piloting the rover from miles away. He can pull up to a patient's bedside, ask questions, observe symptoms and even use a stethoscope. "People forget that you're on the robot, and you forget that you're on the robot," says Vespa, a neurocritical care specialist at UCLA who uses the device to consult in other hospitals and check on UCLA patients from home.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Craig Nakano
Sure, we've got monthly unemployment figures and a consumer confidence index, but how's this for an economic indicator: a high-end furniture line launching at Costco. Starting Aug. 17, after picking up a $1.50 hot dog-and-Coke combo and that discount case of hand sanitizer, shoppers at select Southern California Costco stores can peruse boucl é -upholstered sofas, hardwood headboards and hand-crafted dining room tables, some priced at upwards of $4,000. The Jennifer Adams Home collection will consist of 83 pieces, many to be displayed on a 400-square-foot section of participating Costco stores.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Federal health officials have warned Procter & Gamble Co. that it is unlawfully marketing a new hand sanitizer aimed at use by children. Company claims that Vicks Early Defense Foaming Hand Sanitizer prevents colds and provides up to three hours of antimicrobial activity are not allowed, the Food and Drug Administration said in a letter.
HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Brody Kennedy was a typical sixth-grader who loved to hang out with friends in Castaic and play video games. A strep-throat infection in October caused him to miss a couple of days of school, but he was eager to rejoin his classmates, recalls his mother, Tracy. Then, a week after Brody became ill, he awoke one morning to find his world was no longer safe. Paranoid about germs and obsessed with cleanliness, he refused to touch things and showered several times a day. His fear prevented him from attending school, and he insisted on wearing nothing but a sheet or demanding that his mother microwave his clothes or heat them in the dryer before dressing.
HEALTH
January 12, 2009 | Jill U. Adams
Get that flu vaccine if you want, but don't count on it to keep you healthy this winter. Sure, it can immunize you against scientists' best guess at this year's bug, but it's no guarantee you won't be confined to bed for a couple of days in the event of an outbreak. And of course, there's no vaccine for colds. Even isolating yourself -- from family, friends, coworkers, acquaintances and strangers -- might not be enough to protect you from illness.
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