Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHand Transplant
IN THE NEWS

Hand Transplant

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
A young mother has become the first person to receive a hand transplant at UCLA’s new hand transplantation center, hospital officials reported Monday. The Northern California woman, 26, whose name was not released, had lost her right hand in a traffic accident five years ago. She was recovering Monday following a 14-hour procedure that concluded around 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The operation was the 13th hand transplant in the United States and the first for the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, which opened its hand transplant unit last year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
June 17, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Transplant surgeons at Boston Children's Hospital are looking for kids who need a hand. The renowned Harvard University-affiliated hospital announced Monday that it was opening a pediatric hand transplant program , the first in the world. Hand transplants in adults have become fairly common since the first one was attempted in Ecuador in 1964. The hand involved in that surgery was rejected after two weeks, in large part because doctors didn't have a good understanding of immunosuppression drugs back then, according to this report in Minnesota Medicine.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
July 30, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
A successful hand transplant has a long list of ingredients: a motivated patient; a team of plastic surgeons, orthopedists, neurosurgeons and others to reattach bone, ligaments, nerves and blood vessels; and a suitable donor hand that matches the patient's size, skin color and even hair patterns. The surgery, which can run as long as 14 hours, has been available for a little more than 10 years — the first successful hand transplant was performed in France in 1998, with the U.S. following a year later.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2013 | By Michael Muskal, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
From the moment he entered the room at Johns Hopkins Hospital for his news conference, Brendan Marrocco was a picture of determination. He pushed his wheelchair using his arms and wrists and he smiled, showing off the new limbs. “It feels amazing,” said Marrocco, the only U.S. soldier from the Iraq war to survive losing all four limbs in combat and the recipient of a rare double-arm transplant. “It's something I was waiting for for a long time,” he said of the operation, a first for the hospital . “I don't know what to say,” he said.
NEWS
April 19, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Meet Emily Fennell, the 26-year-old California woman who became the first person in the western United States to receive a hand transplant. Fennell’s surgery and rehabilitation at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center were detailed in the Los Angeles Times Tuesday by health writer Shari Roan. Now UCLA has posted a video featuring the single mother from Yuba City and her unusual medical journey. As Roan describes, Emily lost her right hand nearly five years ago in a automobile accident: “Fennell was a passenger in the front seat of a car that was clipped by another vehicle and rolled over.
HEALTH
March 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
A young mother who lost her right hand in a traffic accident five years ago has become the first person to receive a hand transplant in California and the 13th in the U.S., UCLA officials said Monday. The Northern California woman, 26, whose name was not released, was doing well after the 14-hour procedure at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center's new hand transplantation center. The operation concluded about 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The recipient had been identified as a good candidate for the surgery last year after she contacted UCLA, but doctors had to wait to find an appropriate donor hand that matched the recipient's tissue type and was of similar size, color and hair pattern.
HEALTH
April 19, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
The two patients who made medical history by having hand transplants are doing well and beginning to achieve some function in their new hands, the men's doctors say. It is still not clear, however, how much use of their hands they will eventually achieve. Clint Hallam, a 48-year-old Australian, received the first successful hand transplant in September in Lyon, France. Matthew Scott, 37, of Absecon, N.J., underwent his transplant in January at a Louisville, Ky., hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2000
More than a year after the world's second transplant of a hand, the patient's new hand can sense temperature, pressure and pain, and he can use it to write, turn the pages of a newspaper, throw a baseball and tie shoelaces, according to a report in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The operation was performed Jan. 24, 1999, at the Jewish Hospital of Louisville in Kentucky on a 38-year-old man who received a left hand from a 58-year-old male cadaver.
SPORTS
April 13, 1999
Matthew Scott, the first person in the United States to receive a hand transplant, threw out the first ball Monday at the Philadelphia Phillies' home opener against the Atlanta Braves. The throw to Phillies reserve outfielder Rob Ducey about 25 feet from home plate was high and outside. But it was perfect enough for the 37-year-old Scott, decked out in a No. 13 Phillies jersey and red hat. "I threw a 'wishball,' " a beaming Scott said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1999
Monica Lewinsky . . . impeachment . . . the JonBenet Ramsey murder, again . . . now it's hand transplants capturing the fancy of television producers, just in time for the February ratings sweeps. The Feb. 9 edition of "Dateline NBC" featured an exclusive look at the first U.S. hand transplant recipient. A recent "Chicago Hope" followed a woman who went to court to get her dead mother's hand. Not to be outdone, last week's "ER" had a bloody hand reattachment scene.
NEWS
April 19, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Meet Emily Fennell, the 26-year-old California woman who became the first person in the western United States to receive a hand transplant. Fennell’s surgery and rehabilitation at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center were detailed in the Los Angeles Times Tuesday by health writer Shari Roan. Now UCLA has posted a video featuring the single mother from Yuba City and her unusual medical journey. As Roan describes, Emily lost her right hand nearly five years ago in a automobile accident: “Fennell was a passenger in the front seat of a car that was clipped by another vehicle and rolled over.
NEWS
March 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
A young mother has become the first person to receive a hand transplant at UCLA’s new hand transplantation center, hospital officials reported Monday. The Northern California woman, 26, whose name was not released, had lost her right hand in a traffic accident five years ago. She was recovering Monday following a 14-hour procedure that concluded around 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The operation was the 13th hand transplant in the United States and the first for the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, which opened its hand transplant unit last year.
HEALTH
March 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
A young mother who lost her right hand in a traffic accident five years ago has become the first person to receive a hand transplant in California and the 13th in the U.S., UCLA officials said Monday. The Northern California woman, 26, whose name was not released, was doing well after the 14-hour procedure at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center's new hand transplantation center. The operation concluded about 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The recipient had been identified as a good candidate for the surgery last year after she contacted UCLA, but doctors had to wait to find an appropriate donor hand that matched the recipient's tissue type and was of similar size, color and hair pattern.
SCIENCE
July 30, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
A successful hand transplant has a long list of ingredients: a motivated patient; a team of plastic surgeons, orthopedists, neurosurgeons and others to reattach bone, ligaments, nerves and blood vessels; and a suitable donor hand that matches the patient's size, skin color and even hair patterns. The surgery, which can run as long as 14 hours, has been available for a little more than 10 years — the first successful hand transplant was performed in France in 1998, with the U.S. following a year later.
HEALTH
September 1, 2008 | Karen Ravn, Special to The Times
A team of surgeons gave 32-year-old Dave Robert Armstrong of Upland a hand, last July -- literally. Just 10 years earlier, that wouldn't have been possible. But in September 1998, the first hand transplant was performed in Lyon, France, and since then more than 30 people around the world have received such a transplant -- sometimes, two. Other patients have received arms, faces and abdominal walls -- varied types of composite tissue allotransplantation, or CTA, meaning multiple tissues are involved (skin, muscle, tendon, bone, cartilage, fat, nerves, blood vessels)
NEWS
December 25, 2005 | Angela Doland, Associated Press Writer
The woman who received a new nose, chin and lips in groundbreaking surgery last month had a warm chat with the man who was the world's first double hand transplant patient, a psychiatrist who has treated both of them said Friday. Denis Chatelier, the Frenchman who received new hands in a January 2000 operation, offered the woman encouragement at a meeting held discreetly Thursday to avoid media scrutiny, Dr. Daniele Bachmann said.
NEWS
February 18, 2001 | From Associated Press
A Michigan man whose left hand was blown off by a defective firework received a new hand Saturday. Jerry Fisher, 36, became the second person to receive a hand transplant in the United States. He was in stable condition following a 13-hour operation at Jewish Hospital in Louisville, Ky., the same hospital where the nation's first hand transplant was performed in January 1999. The hospital did not release any information about the donor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Surgeons and ethicists are pondering a host of questions in the aftermath of an unprecedented hand transplant conducted in France three weeks ago. An international team of surgeons at Edouard Herriot Hospital in Lyon took the hand and lower arm from a man who died in an accident and grafted them onto the arm of a man who had lost his hand 10 years ago.
HEALTH
February 2, 2004 | By Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Society may not be quite ready for the day when a dead person's face is recycled for the living - but that day is coming nonetheless. Such an operation would give new life to someone severely disfigured by burns, cancer or an accident, allowing the person to exist free of the stares and shock their appearances often evoke. The procedure would be more straightforward than the many reconstructive surgeries such victims usually must endure. Already, doctors at the University of Louisville in Kentucky say they hope to soon select a candidate for the operation, possibly within the year.
NEWS
February 18, 2001 | From Associated Press
A Michigan man whose left hand was blown off by a defective firework received a new hand Saturday. Jerry Fisher, 36, became the second person to receive a hand transplant in the United States. He was in stable condition following a 13-hour operation at Jewish Hospital in Louisville, Ky., the same hospital where the nation's first hand transplant was performed in January 1999. The hospital did not release any information about the donor.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|