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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997
The state Department of Rehabilitation released a plan Monday outlining the way emergency response teams should assist disabled people before, during and after natural disasters. The report was presented by department Director Brenda Premo to Greg Renick of the governor's office of emergency services' Pasadena district field office at a news conference at the Independent Living Center of Southern California in Van Nuys.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997
The state Department of Rehabilitation released a plan Monday outlining the way emergency response teams should assist disabled people before, during and after natural disasters. The report was presented by department Director Brenda Premo to Greg Renick of the governor's office of emergency services' Pasadena district field office at a news conference at the Independent Living Center of Southern California in Van Nuys.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sprint Opens Center for Disabled: Sprint said it has opened a new relay communications center in Sacramento through which it will provide complete telephone communication services to Californians who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech-impaired. The service, which begins today, is provided under a contract awarded the Kansas City-based long-distance carrier last October by the California Public Utilities Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
The state Department of Rehabilitation released a comprehensive plan Monday stipulating how emergency response teams should assist disabled people before, during and after natural disasters. The 81-page disaster preparedness report was presented by department Director Brenda Premo to Greg Renick of the governor's Office of Emergency Services' district field office in Pasadena at a news conference at the Independent Living Center of Southern California in Van Nuys.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cellular Phone Firm Proposes Rates for Disabled: Bay Area cellular telephone carrier Cellular One has asked the California Public Utilities Commission to approve a cut-rate service for people with disabilities. Developed with Motorola and the World Institute on Disabilities, the Enable-link service would offer mobility- and vision-impaired people cellular service for $10 a month, as opposed to $25 or $50 per month now.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Francisco Superior Court judge Tuesday ordered state officials to resume paying 155,000 minimum-wage workers who provide home care services to disabled Californians but have not been paid for 12 days because of the state's budget impasse. State Controller Gray Davis said he would issue checks as soon as the Department of Social Services turned over payroll records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
The state Department of Rehabilitation released a comprehensive plan Monday stipulating how emergency response teams should assist disabled people before, during and after natural disasters. The 81-page disaster preparedness report was presented by department Director Brenda Premo to Greg Renick of the governor's Office of Emergency Services' district field office in Pasadena at a news conference at the Independent Living Center of Southern California in Van Nuys.
NEWS
April 12, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court, extending new protection to disabled workers, on Thursday let stand an appellate ruling requiring a smoke-free workplace for employees with respiratory ailments aggravated by tobacco smoke. The justices refused to hear a challenge to a far-reaching appellate court ruling that workers whose functions are impaired by tobacco smoke are "physically handicapped" and thus protected under the state Fair Employment and Housing Act.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Francisco Superior Court judge Tuesday ordered state officials to resume paying 155,000 minimum-wage workers who provide home care services to disabled Californians but have not been paid for 12 days because of the state's budget impasse. State Controller Gray Davis said he would issue checks as soon as the Department of Social Services turned over payroll records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1990
More than 2,500 disabled athletes are expected to participate in the California Special Olympics games today and Sunday at the UCLA campus in Westwood, organizers said Friday. The athletes, who range in age from 7 to 70, will compete in 10 sports including basketball, gymnastics, soccer, football, tennis, track and field, and power lifting, said Rafer Johnson, state president for the Special Olympics. Events begin at 8 a.m. both days and continue today until 4 p.m. and Sunday till 3 p.m.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 2,000 developmentally disabled people, their families and caretakers rallied at a Mid-Wilshire park Thursday, demanding a swift end to the state budget stalemate that threatens to cut their lifeline services. Many using wheelchairs or supported by crutches angrily called on Gov.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Francisco Superior Court judge Tuesday ordered state officials to resume paying 155,000 minimum-wage workers who provide home care services to disabled Californians but have not been paid for 12 days because of the state's budget impasse. State Controller Gray Davis said he would issue checks as soon as the Department of Social Services turned over payroll records.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Francisco Superior Court judge Tuesday ordered state officials to resume paying 155,000 minimum-wage workers who provide home care services to disabled Californians but have not been paid for 12 days because of the state's budget impasse. State Controller Gray Davis said he would issue checks as soon as the Department of Social Services turned over payroll records.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cellular Phone Firm Proposes Rates for Disabled: Bay Area cellular telephone carrier Cellular One has asked the California Public Utilities Commission to approve a cut-rate service for people with disabilities. Developed with Motorola and the World Institute on Disabilities, the Enable-link service would offer mobility- and vision-impaired people cellular service for $10 a month, as opposed to $25 or $50 per month now.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sprint Opens Center for Disabled: Sprint said it has opened a new relay communications center in Sacramento through which it will provide complete telephone communication services to Californians who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech-impaired. The service, which begins today, is provided under a contract awarded the Kansas City-based long-distance carrier last October by the California Public Utilities Commission.
NEWS
April 12, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court, extending new protection to disabled workers, on Thursday let stand an appellate ruling requiring a smoke-free workplace for employees with respiratory ailments aggravated by tobacco smoke. The justices refused to hear a challenge to a far-reaching appellate court ruling that workers whose functions are impaired by tobacco smoke are "physically handicapped" and thus protected under the state Fair Employment and Housing Act.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proposition 110, a June ballot issue giving the Legislature the authority to create a property tax credit for disabled homeowners, is designed to help someone like Marsha Clark, a 44-year-old Simi Valley woman with multiple sclerosis.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 2,000 developmentally disabled people, their families and caretakers rallied at a Mid-Wilshire park Thursday, demanding a swift end to the state budget stalemate that threatens to cut their lifeline services. Many using wheelchairs or supported by crutches angrily called on Gov.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gov. Pete Wilson on Wednesday appointed Bill Tainter, a polio victim and leader of a national movement to develop independent living skills for the disabled, director of the state Department of Rehabilitation. To demonstrate his commitment to disabled Californians, the governor also indicated that he will try to protect the department from the substantial cuts he said must be made to help state government overcome its budget crisis.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for severely mentally and physically disabled Californians living in residential treatment facilities have filed suit in Sacramento County Superior Court to prevent the state from cutting payments to these facilities. The attorneys contend that 700 facilities statewide--or about 15% of the 5,000 community-based homes for disabled Californians--may close if $2.7 million in state funds is withheld by the state Department of Developmental Services.
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