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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1995 | TIM MAY
He bats. He throws. He catches, runs, slides and generally enjoys himself as much as any 8-year-old boy in a ballpark would. But David Rodriguez can't hear. And that has made it tough for the San Fernando boy to be part of teams where nobody can understand sign language. So David's mom, Sylvia Rodriguez, did what moms do. If she couldn't integrate David into their baseball leagues, she'd integrate them into his. Rodriguez began the Mainstream Sports League in 1993.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1998 | JEFF KASS
Children laughed, shouted and skipped backward as pop music played in the background Tuesday at Wallace R. Davis Elementary School in Santa Ana. But this time around, the activity leader was Jeff Andrews, 11, who moved his wheelchair backward as almost two dozen of his classmates followed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993 | JEFF SCHNAUFER and MATTHEW HELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sylvia Rodriguez got tired of the other boys teasing her deaf son when he went to the park to play baseball. So she decided to form a league where teasing couldn't be heard. Rodriguez, 37, is spearheading an effort at Panorama Recreation Center in Panorama City to develop a baseball league for deaf youngsters. Working with recreation leaders, she has already drawn about half of the 40 students she needs to form four teams for a league. "It's going pretty good.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1997 | KIMBERLY SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jeff Mattson, a 17-year-old with Down syndrome, put on his uniform for the first time, he said, "Now, I'm a real kid." Basketball coach Darrell Burnett smiled and put his arm around Jeff as he related the story. "It makes sense to have kids involved in sports," said Burnett, a child psychologist. "It's such a self-esteem builder."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1991 | JON NALICK
Eleven-year-old Wesley Brewer grabbed the baton from his teammate and bolted for the finish line with grim determination. But as he finished first moments later, his countenance lightened considerably. After an exchange of high-fives with his teammates, Brewer, with short and spiky blond hair, called the experience "fun." "I like to win," he added.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1997 | KIMBERLY SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jeff Mattson, a 17-year-old with Down syndrome, put on his uniform for the first time, he said, "Now, I'm a real kid." Basketball coach Darrell Burnett smiled and put his arm around Jeff as he related the story. "It makes sense to have kids involved in sports," said Burnett, a child psychologist. "It's such a self-esteem builder."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1993
Disabled children between the ages of 7 and 18 are invited to sign up for a free sports camp April 6 to 10 at Saddleback College in Mission Viejo. The 13th annual Junior Wheelchair Sports and Tennis Training Camp, organized by the National Foundation of Wheelchair Tennis, will offer instruction and competition in tennis, basketball, track and field, archery, swimming and physical conditioning.
SPORTS
June 2, 1990 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was opening day at the Little League field and the players couldn't wait to get started. A girl with cerebral palsy quietly rolled her wheelchair back and forth. A boy with Down's syndrome pounded his glove. More apprehensive than the players were their parents. "We all had goose bumps," said Dawn Barsh, whose 12-year-old son Paul has a rare chromosome abnormality that has left him severely disabled. "There was such intense emotional energy that nobody could speak."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1990 | RON SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After spending most of Thursday morning surfing off Malibu Beach, 13-year-old Monica Vasquez decided it was time to change her name to something that more aptly described her new-found talent. "Just call me Ms. Surfer," the blind teen-ager said Thursday after surfing for the first time in her life. "I was born on the surfboard." Well, maybe she wasn't born on a surfboard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For most of the Little League players on this field, just learning to distinguish first base from third will earn them a round of smiles and cheers from the stands. In the Challenger division of Little League, where kids with physical and mental disabilities learn the basics of the American pastime, the spirit of the game really is more important than winning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For most of the Little League players on this field, just learning to distinguish first base from third will earn them a round of smiles and cheers from the stands. In the Challenger division of Little League, where kids with physical and mental disabilities learn the basics of the American pastime, the spirit of the game really is more important than winning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1995 | TIM MAY
He bats. He throws. He catches, runs, slides and generally enjoys himself as much as any 8-year-old boy in a ballpark would. But David Rodriguez can't hear. And that has made it tough for the San Fernando boy to be part of teams where nobody can understand sign language. So David's mom, Sylvia Rodriguez, did what moms do. If she couldn't integrate David into their baseball leagues, she'd integrate them into his. Rodriguez began the Mainstream Sports League in 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993 | JEFF SCHNAUFER and MATTHEW HELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sylvia Rodriguez got tired of the other boys teasing her deaf son when he went to the park to play baseball. So she decided to form a league where teasing couldn't be heard. Rodriguez, 37, is spearheading an effort at Panorama Recreation Center in Panorama City to develop a baseball league for deaf youngsters. Working with recreation leaders, she has already drawn about half of the 40 students she needs to form four teams for a league. "It's going pretty good.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1993
Disabled children between the ages of 7 and 18 are invited to sign up for a free sports camp April 6 to 10 at Saddleback College in Mission Viejo. The 13th annual Junior Wheelchair Sports and Tennis Training Camp, organized by the National Foundation of Wheelchair Tennis, will offer instruction and competition in tennis, basketball, track and field, archery, swimming and physical conditioning.
NEWS
July 10, 1992
You see it on players' faces at every level of baseball: elation as a single pierces the infield and drives in the tie-breaking run. Now you can see it on the faces of children who until recently got no closer to a game than the bleachers. The Challenger Division, a part of Little League baseball devoted to children with physical and mental disabilities, was introduced in 1989 and since then has expanded internationally to 679 leagues and 25,000 players.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1991 | JON NALICK
Eleven-year-old Wesley Brewer grabbed the baton from his teammate and bolted for the finish line with grim determination. But as he finished first moments later, his countenance lightened considerably. After an exchange of high-fives with his teammates, Brewer, with short and spiky blond hair, called the experience "fun." "I like to win," he added.
NEWS
July 10, 1992
You see it on players' faces at every level of baseball: elation as a single pierces the infield and drives in the tie-breaking run. Now you can see it on the faces of children who until recently got no closer to a game than the bleachers. The Challenger Division, a part of Little League baseball devoted to children with physical and mental disabilities, was introduced in 1989 and since then has expanded internationally to 679 leagues and 25,000 players.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1990 | MICHAEL ASHCRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scarlett Sanguinetti's teammate crashed into her in the relay race. When it came time to pass the baton, Scarlett was standing still instead of running down the lane for a backhand pass. But once she claimed the baton from her teammate, she bounded around the red track, her face iron-set with determination. Scarlett was an Olympic athlete Saturday. And while her running probably would not qualify her for the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, it would not be through lack of effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1990 | RON SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After spending most of Thursday morning surfing off Malibu Beach, 13-year-old Monica Vasquez decided it was time to change her name to something that more aptly described her new-found talent. "Just call me Ms. Surfer," the blind teen-ager said Thursday after surfing for the first time in her life. "I was born on the surfboard." Well, maybe she wasn't born on a surfboard.
SPORTS
June 2, 1990 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was opening day at the Little League field and the players couldn't wait to get started. A girl with cerebral palsy quietly rolled her wheelchair back and forth. A boy with Down's syndrome pounded his glove. More apprehensive than the players were their parents. "We all had goose bumps," said Dawn Barsh, whose 12-year-old son Paul has a rare chromosome abnormality that has left him severely disabled. "There was such intense emotional energy that nobody could speak."
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