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October 17, 1996 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She is the mother of six children and the grandmother of 13 others. She spent decades as a health care worker, taking care of people unable to take care of themselves. But even a lifetime of mothering could not prepare 61-year-old Patricia Jaynes for Alex. "I call my grandchildren angels," Jaynes said. "They all teach me something about myself. . . . And Alex is one special angel."
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NEWS
August 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Nearly 100,000 children have been removed from disability rolls as the government quietly implements one of the most controversial provisions of last year's welfare reform law. Advocates complain that children are being unfairly pushed out of the program, but officials say they are simply implementing the tough provisions Congress enacted. "We know this is a tough standard," Susan Daniels, associate commissioner for disability at the Social Security Administration, said Thursday.
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NEWS
February 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New federal rules expand by up to 37,000 a year the number of children entitled to disability benefits. The government for the first time will consider not only children's medical conditions but also the effect those conditions have on their ability to walk, eat, dress and perform other daily activities. Old rules applied a rigid list of disorders--deafness, for example--to children but permitted adults to be judged on their ability to work.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She is the mother of six children and the grandmother of 13 others. She spent decades as a health care worker, taking care of people unable to take care of themselves. But even a lifetime of mothering could not prepare 61-year-old Patricia Jaynes for Alex. "I call my grandchildren angels," Jaynes said. "They all teach me something about myself. . . . And Alex is one special angel."
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By this time next year, tens of thousands of disabled children may vanish from federal assistance rolls. Their disorders will remain the same, their symptoms unchanged. What will be different is the way the government defines childhood disability. The change is more than an exercise in semantics.
NEWS
August 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Nearly 100,000 children have been removed from disability rolls as the government quietly implements one of the most controversial provisions of last year's welfare reform law. Advocates complain that children are being unfairly pushed out of the program, but officials say they are simply implementing the tough provisions Congress enacted. "We know this is a tough standard," Susan Daniels, associate commissioner for disability at the Social Security Administration, said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1991
As many as 50,000 disabled California children who were denied supplemental security income payments in the 1980s may be eligible for back benefits under terms of a U.S. Supreme Court decision handed down last year, according to Elena Ackel, a Los Angeles Legal Aid attorney. The Supreme Court decided in the case of Zebley vs. Sullivan that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services illegally denied benefits to disabled children because of overly restrictive standards between Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A royal blue breathing hose hangs from her throat and a feeding tube winds from a small hole in her stomach. Machines beep incessantly as oxygen and medication are pumped into the infant lying placidly on the couch of her parents' North Hollywood home. Year-old Angelique Petitt is unfazed, spared of the knowledge that without these fragile lifelines--and around-the-clock attention from her mother--she would be dead within hours from a host of congenital defects.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By this time next year, tens of thousands of disabled children may vanish from federal assistance rolls. Their disorders will remain the same, their symptoms unchanged. What will be different is the way the government defines childhood disability. The change is more than an exercise in semantics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A royal blue breathing hose hangs from her throat and a feeding tube winds from a small hole in her stomach. Machines beep incessantly as oxygen and medication are pumped into the infant lying placidly on the couch of her parents' North Hollywood home. Year-old Angelique Petitt is unfazed, spared of the knowledge that without these fragile lifelines--and around-the-clock attention from her mother--she would be dead within hours from a host of congenital defects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1991
As many as 50,000 disabled California children who were denied supplemental security income payments in the 1980s may be eligible for back benefits under terms of a U.S. Supreme Court decision handed down last year, according to Elena Ackel, a Los Angeles Legal Aid attorney. The Supreme Court decided in the case of Zebley vs. Sullivan that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services illegally denied benefits to disabled children because of overly restrictive standards between Jan.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Bush Administration said it will reconsider the cases of more than 400,000 children denied Social Security disability benefits under criteria struck down last year by the Supreme Court. The Administration, which has recently developed new standards, pledged in federal court papers signed by a judge to rehear rejections dating back to Jan. 1, 1980. The children's cases will be judged under new criteria drawn up by Social Security this year.
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