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Handicapped Children Orange County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1993 | ROBERT BARKER
Severely disabled students at Gill Special Education Center dressed up this week in flapper dresses or black shirts and white ties of the Roaring '20s era and went to the junior and senior prom to celebrate the end of summer classes. "They deserve what everybody else gets," said Peggy Bosselman, an instructor assistant. "They get dressed up and feel beautiful and it gives them dignity."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first thing Alex Tempel did after waking up Monday morning was to mark off the final day on the makeshift calendar he's kept next to his bed the last 300 days. Then he flew home. The calendar is actually a long sheet of construction paper on which his father had written rows of numbers, from 300 to 1. At 14, Alex is still learning the concept of weeks, months and years. But by marking off each number, he knew he would be another day closer to leaving Randolph, Mass.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The doctor chuckled with delight as the brown-haired girl smiled, chanted and swung her arms playfully in the air above her crib. Dr. Stephen Osburn said he felt gratified that Christina, a profoundly retarded 4-year-old, has a chance to develop, maybe even learn a few words, now that he has helped her overcome a debilitating series of illnesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2000 | RAUL GALLEGOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Cindy Reimer and her family bought a home in the Placentia area two years ago, they were investing not only in a house but in their disabled son's education. A special program run by the county at George Key School in Placentia provided Alex, 17, with the programs, instruction and caring teachers he needed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1993 | JON NALICK
Lending a light touch to a serious topic, puppeteers Friday performed a show at an elementary school aimed at teaching children to respect others with mental and physical disabilities. About 1,100 students at Jackson Elementary School laughed and giggled during the skits, which pointed out that although all people are unique, their similarities far outweigh their differences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1996 | KIMBERLY BROWER
When Lois Lovell arrives at work every day, she is welcomed with hugs and smiles. Those who greet her are her "grandchildren"--at least for a few hours--through a program that matches senior citizens like Lovell with developmentally disabled children and adults at eight sites across Orange County. The foster grandparent program has given her life new meaning and purpose, said Lovell, 65, of Tustin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1992 | JON NALICK
The four dozen students at the Blind Children's Learning Center wasted no time in exploring their new school. After all, it was four times bigger than the cramped quarters with which they were familiar. On Tuesday, their second day at the school, many of the 4- and 5-year-olds scampered around the playground and climbed onto swings and merry-go-rounds. Even though being there meant that summer was over, none of the children seemed to mind. Many said they enjoyed being back at school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roslyn Howard is worried and scared. "The bills have been stacking up while I've been waiting for the state to send us money," she said Wednesday as she sat in her home here with her two developmentally disabled sons. Howard is, in effect, an employee of the state. She works for the minimum wage--$4.25 an hour--in a state program called In Home Supportive Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1994 | YVETTE CABRERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few wondered aloud if the snow was real. Others touched the ice-cold flecks for the first time as they waited for their turn and talked nervously about the ride to come. But none of the visually impaired children rejected the chance to slide down the human-created mountain of snow. "It was like flying. The wind was blowing on me," said partially sighted Michael, huffing his way for the umpteenth time to the top of the slope at Knott's Berry Farm's 10th Winter Wonderland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Students at the Blind Children's Learning Center spent Wednesday morning scooping up some of the most high-tech Easter eggs around: L'eggs pantyhose containers fitted with beepers that emit a high-pitched wail. The multicolored eggs were spread across the learning center's front lawn as part of an annual ritual--now in its 11th year--that allows the preschoolers with sight impairments to participate in an Easter egg hunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1998 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking directly into the camera with chocolate-brown eyes framed by long black lashes, Pedro asks for something that most children his age take for granted: "I need love, I need a home, I need a family." The lines Pedro sings are part of a rap song he composed and videotaped in the hope that someday, someone looking to add to their family will hear his message and decide to take the 13-year-old home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a rousing performance of "The Ugly Duckling," and 14 children on stage here for the first time are proving their grace. A 10-year-old named Danny, the designated "duckling" in this song-and-dance revue, has the microphone and the spotlight. Behind him a chorus of quacking classmates sings, "You're a very fine swan indeed." "Why it's me," Danny says, keen to the revelation. "I am a swan indeed." The audience of 120 claps and cheers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Students at the Blind Children's Learning Center spent Wednesday morning scooping up some of the most high-tech Easter eggs around: L'eggs pantyhose containers fitted with beepers that emit a high-pitched wail. The multicolored eggs were spread across the learning center's front lawn as part of an annual ritual--now in its 11th year--that allows the preschoolers with sight impairments to participate in an Easter egg hunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1996 | KIMBERLY BROWER
When Lois Lovell arrives at work every day, she is welcomed with hugs and smiles. Those who greet her are her "grandchildren"--at least for a few hours--through a program that matches senior citizens like Lovell with developmentally disabled children and adults at eight sites across Orange County. The foster grandparent program has given her life new meaning and purpose, said Lovell, 65, of Tustin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1996 | ALAN EYERLY
About 500 developmentally disabled youth experienced the joys of fishing, many for the first time, as they angled for rainbow trout in Anaheim with the help of volunteers from the Easter Seal Society of Southern California. Among the eager participants lining the banks of the Santa Ana River Lakes on Friday was Cristina Munoz, 18, from Santa Ana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1994 | YVETTE CABRERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few wondered aloud if the snow was real. Others touched the ice-cold flecks for the first time as they waited for their turn and talked nervously about the ride to come. But none of the visually impaired children rejected the chance to slide down the human-created mountain of snow. "It was like flying. The wind was blowing on me," said partially sighted Michael, huffing his way for the umpteenth time to the top of the slope at Knott's Berry Farm's 10th Winter Wonderland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1996 | ALAN EYERLY
About 500 developmentally disabled youth experienced the joys of fishing, many for the first time, as they angled for rainbow trout in Anaheim with the help of volunteers from the Easter Seal Society of Southern California. Among the eager participants lining the banks of the Santa Ana River Lakes on Friday was Cristina Munoz, 18, from Santa Ana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 7,000 severely handicapped people in Orange County will have no financing for their care and shelter if a state budget is not signed by Friday, officials announced here Monday. The private, nonprofit Developmental Disabilities Center of Orange County, which distributes state funds to homes and services for the severely handicapped or retarded, would be forced to close Friday because state law doesn't authorize IOUs for private agencies, center officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1994 | JON NALICK
City and county officials broke ground Wednesday for a new "barrier-free playground" designed to meet the needs of disabled children. The playground at Thornton Park will include rubberized play surfaces suited for people in wheelchairs, as well as ramps and other innovations to permit disabled children to play on climbing equipment, swings and slides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1993 | ROBERT BARKER
Severely disabled students at Gill Special Education Center dressed up this week in flapper dresses or black shirts and white ties of the Roaring '20s era and went to the junior and senior prom to celebrate the end of summer classes. "They deserve what everybody else gets," said Peggy Bosselman, an instructor assistant. "They get dressed up and feel beautiful and it gives them dignity."
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