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NEWS
August 16, 1990 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a lump in her throat as Lilibeth Navarro looked on with 2,000 other disabled people as President Bush signed the historic Americans with Disabilities Act last month. The wide-ranging civil rights law, which prohibits discrimination against the disabled in employment, transportation, public accommodations and other areas, is "the world's first declaration of equality" for the disabled, Bush proclaimed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting in his living room and wearing a big smile, William Rayber boasted that he watched television until 10 Wednesday night. "I can go to sleep when I want. If I want, I'll watch TV until midnight," he said Thursday. "It's always been a dream of mine to have a place of my own." That dream became a reality for Rayber this week when he moved into his one-bedroom condo in Canoga Park, marking the first time he has lived alone.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
Responding to complaints that the Federal Emergency Management Agency did not appropriately address the needs of disabled victims of the Northridge earthquake, the head of the agency's civil rights arm said FEMA would try to be more responsive in the future. "I'm sure there are lessons that can be learned," said Alan Clive, speaking at a forum on the agency's response to the Jan. 17 quake at the Independent Living Center in Van Nuys.
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Croxton lost her house during the fight for her disability payments. Miguel Hernandez lost his life. Administrative law judges ultimately ruled that both were disabled and entitled to benefits. But the wait for justice was long and personally devastating, as it is for hundreds of thousands of other disabled people nationwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES
The U.S. Department of Education has awarded the National Center on Deafness at Cal State Northridge a $1-million grant to assist students who are deaf or hearing impaired. The National Center on Deafness is a component of CSUN's School of Communication, Health and Human Services. The grant will cover instructional support services such as tutoring, note-taking and interpreting as well as enrichment classes and orientation for the 250 students at CSUN who are deaf and hearing-impaired.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-ribbon citizens panel called Thursday for increased benefits and other reforms in a federal program assisting 1.5 million elderly poor and 3.9 million blind and disabled persons. The panel, headed by Arthur S. Flemming, former health secretary in the Dwight D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1998 | TOM BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A financially strapped program for visually impaired adults is under investigation by the state attorney general's office for misuse of funds. The Van Nuys-based Visually Handicapped Adults of the Valley is in the midst of a financial crisis that has led volunteers to threaten a strike unless chairwoman Helen Harris resigns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government unveiled long-awaited guidelines Tuesday that could allow tens of thousands of physically and mentally disabled immigrants, many of them in Los Angeles, to become U.S. citizens without passing English and U.S. civics tests. The new rules, more than two years in the making, come as 500,000 elderly and disabled noncitizens nationwide--40% of them in California--face a cutoff this summer of federal Supplemental Security Income benefits.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
Valerie Hartwell celebrated her 18th birthday at home on June 25 by watching taped movies with her boyfriend. It was the kind of normalcy, all too fleeting these days, that the young Vermont woman treasures. Hartwell, who has cystic fibrosis, diabetes, asthma and scoliosis, has spent seven of the last 13 weeks in the hospital. A therapist beats on her chest every day with cupped hands to loosen up the mucus that gums her lungs and causes her body to be racked with coughs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting in his living room and wearing a big smile, William Rayber boasted that he watched television until 10 Wednesday night. "I can go to sleep when I want. If I want, I'll watch TV until midnight," he said Thursday. "It's always been a dream of mine to have a place of my own." That dream became a reality for Rayber this week when he moved into his one-bedroom condo in Canoga Park, marking the first time he has lived alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1998 | TOM BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A financially strapped program for visually impaired adults is under investigation by the state attorney general's office for misuse of funds. The Van Nuys-based Visually Handicapped Adults of the Valley is in the midst of a financial crisis that has led volunteers to threaten a strike unless chairwoman Helen Harris resigns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forgive George Poon if he remained unconvinced Thursday, a day after Congress moved to restore benefit eligibility to 86,000 disabled and elderly legal immigrants living in L.A. County and more than 400,000 noncitizens elsewhere. "They could still pull a fast one on us," said Poon, director of the Chinatown Senior Citizen Service Center, where government assistance checks have long been a mainstay for elderly clients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government unveiled long-awaited guidelines Tuesday that could allow tens of thousands of physically and mentally disabled immigrants, many of them in Los Angeles, to become U.S. citizens without passing English and U.S. civics tests. The new rules, more than two years in the making, come as 500,000 elderly and disabled noncitizens nationwide--40% of them in California--face a cutoff this summer of federal Supplemental Security Income benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES
The U.S. Department of Education has awarded the National Center on Deafness at Cal State Northridge a $1-million grant to assist students who are deaf or hearing impaired. The National Center on Deafness is a component of CSUN's School of Communication, Health and Human Services. The grant will cover instructional support services such as tutoring, note-taking and interpreting as well as enrichment classes and orientation for the 250 students at CSUN who are deaf and hearing-impaired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
Responding to complaints that the Federal Emergency Management Agency did not appropriately address the needs of disabled victims of the Northridge earthquake, the head of the agency's civil rights arm said FEMA would try to be more responsive in the future. "I'm sure there are lessons that can be learned," said Alan Clive, speaking at a forum on the agency's response to the Jan. 17 quake at the Independent Living Center in Van Nuys.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-ribbon citizens panel called Thursday for increased benefits and other reforms in a federal program assisting 1.5 million elderly poor and 3.9 million blind and disabled persons. The panel, headed by Arthur S. Flemming, former health secretary in the Dwight D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forgive George Poon if he remained unconvinced Thursday, a day after Congress moved to restore benefit eligibility to 86,000 disabled and elderly legal immigrants living in L.A. County and more than 400,000 noncitizens elsewhere. "They could still pull a fast one on us," said Poon, director of the Chinatown Senior Citizen Service Center, where government assistance checks have long been a mainstay for elderly clients.
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Croxton lost her house during the fight for her disability payments. Miguel Hernandez lost his life. Administrative law judges ultimately ruled that both were disabled and entitled to benefits. But the wait for justice was long and personally devastating, as it is for hundreds of thousands of other disabled people nationwide.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a lump in her throat as Lilibeth Navarro looked on with 2,000 other disabled people as President Bush signed the historic Americans with Disabilities Act last month. The wide-ranging civil rights law, which prohibits discrimination against the disabled in employment, transportation, public accommodations and other areas, is "the world's first declaration of equality" for the disabled, Bush proclaimed.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
Valerie Hartwell celebrated her 18th birthday at home on June 25 by watching taped movies with her boyfriend. It was the kind of normalcy, all too fleeting these days, that the young Vermont woman treasures. Hartwell, who has cystic fibrosis, diabetes, asthma and scoliosis, has spent seven of the last 13 weeks in the hospital. A therapist beats on her chest every day with cupped hands to loosen up the mucus that gums her lungs and causes her body to be racked with coughs.
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