Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHandicapped Japan
IN THE NEWS

Handicapped Japan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a young man, Yasuhiko Kono had few options. Cataracts caused by a case of childhood measles robbed him of his sight by the time he was 17. His family decided his future would be as a masseur, the only real trade available to the blind in Japan. But Kono rebelled. He became a photographer. In a land ruled by rigid conformity, where the disabled are generally kept out of sight and out of mind, Kono's struggle against the odds is an example of extraordinary will.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a young man, Yasuhiko Kono had few options. Cataracts caused by a case of childhood measles robbed him of his sight by the time he was 17. His family decided his future would be as a masseur, the only real trade available to the blind in Japan. But Kono rebelled. He became a photographer. In a land ruled by rigid conformity, where the disabled are generally kept out of sight and out of mind, Kono's struggle against the odds is an example of extraordinary will.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 12, 1985 | TIA GINDICK, Times Staff Writer
It might have been any other cocktail reception at the Beverly Hills Hotel: pretty, casually moneyed folks drinking white wine over ice, graciously declining tempting hors d'oeuvres, chatting easily with each other while a pianist playing background music made the gathering sound much larger and noisier than it really was. Enter the Japanese. Just arrived from Tokyo, they'd come to spread good will, to get people excited and expectant. They'd come to get the party started.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles designer Gregory Poe recalls with amazement the day a group of Japanese manufacturers showed him his chart--the one that plotted his business career far into the hazy future. "They had a Gregory Poe projection sheet that ran into the year 2000," he says. "I don't know where I'm going, but they know where I'm going." Poe isn't discussing astrology.
NEWS
June 29, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's sick of it all--the strait-laced system that demands conformity, rewards seniority over talent and keeps everyone working day and night in an expensive, teeming homogeneous spot. She's gifted and single and yearns to be free--to be liberated from an uncreative society with an obsessive concern with gender-based roles. Now they both have found a way out.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|