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Handicapped Person

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1991
I am writing about your article regarding the misuse of disabled parking placards (Metro, April 12). Recently, while walking on a major street in Beverly Hills, I counted eight Mercedes parked in a row and all had the disabled placard on the dash. At the time I figured the odds of finding eight disabled persons in Mercedes parked one after another were about as great as winning the lottery. It seems to me the way to prevent people from misusing the placards or loaning them to friends or family members is to issue a special license plate that would indicate the driver of the car is entitled to handicapped parking.
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NATIONAL
September 1, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Nino Frediani stands in his kitchen, ready for an impromptu demonstration of his craft: throwing things into the air with controlled abandon. "This is how a normal juggler does it," he says, launching three small yellow balls above his head. But the 73-year-old Frediani is no normal juggler. After a few rotations, he tosses one ball almost to the ceiling and misses its return. It hits the floor and rolls under the table. "Now, this is how I do it. " He starts again.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1985
This is in response to Patsy Smiley's letter (July 17), "$6 Fee." My husband doesn't mind paying $6 for a two-year parking permit for disabled persons. The part he minds is the time it takes to get it. First one must go the the Department of Motor Vehicles to get an official form. Then you take it to your doctor for his signature. Then you return to the DMV and stand in line from 1 1/2 hours to 2 hours to pay your $6 and get your permit. It is this standing in line that long that is hard on the handicapped person.
TRAVEL
August 5, 2012
I just read the piece about Barcelona, Spain, and the Stone Roses concerts and am compelled to write "Kudos to Kari Howard" ["Rock the Vacay," July 22]. Her style, the personality of her writing, the great unusual descriptions, all were so refreshing and engaging. Her words built such a vivid picture of her trip, the place, her feelings and excitement about it all. I've wanted to go to Barcelona, but now she's really put the hook in me. I look forward to reading more from her. Susan Emshwiller Eagle Rock :: For the record, Howard is not crazy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1993
As an employee at Ports O'Call in San Pedro, I was very happy to read about Sea Legs in the South Bay edition of Sunday's paper. Seeing as I live in Long Beach, I was sorry that it did not appear in our issue as well. In this day when all you hear about are businesses closing, it is so nice to know that there are still people out there willing to go out on a limb for what they believe in. Gianni Brill and Julie Cross have started something here that goes beyond the traditional business.
NEWS
September 25, 1987
What is the Latin equivalent of chutzpah? Deep in your story about the remarkable Tony Melendez, the thalidomide victim whose armless guitar performance so impressed Pope John Paul II at the Universal Amphitheatre, you report that his adolescent desire to become a priest was quashed when he "was turned down because of his handicap" ("A Star of the Papal Tour" by Beverly Beyette, Sept. 17). A few paragraphs later, while proudly extolling Melendez's talents, his priest, Father De Pasquale, declares: "We don't ever think of Tony as a handicapped person."
NATIONAL
September 1, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Nino Frediani stands in his kitchen, ready for an impromptu demonstration of his craft: throwing things into the air with controlled abandon. "This is how a normal juggler does it," he says, launching three small yellow balls above his head. But the 73-year-old Frediani is no normal juggler. After a few rotations, he tosses one ball almost to the ceiling and misses its return. It hits the floor and rolls under the table. "Now, this is how I do it. " He starts again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1996
I read with sad fascination your article regarding the use of handicapped placards by valet parking attendants in Brentwood (Dec. 14). I have observed and reported similar misuse in Old Town Pasadena, all to no avail. However, the most insidious and obvious misuse of these placards is by the numerous stretch limos that sometimes occupy multiple handicapped spaces at the Los Angeles International Airport and other public facilities. Misuse of any state-issued license should be addressed aggressively and promptly.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
The article in the People's Daily was startling for its candor. "We have children who chase crippled people down the street and lob stones at them, or gather together to jeer and hoot. Not only children, but even some (Communist) party cadres sneer at handicapped people," the article said. "As far as handicapped people are concerned, China is relatively backward."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1991 | BERNICE HIRABAYASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you see Alex Montoya and wonder about his prosthetic arms, go ahead and ask him what he's all about. He likes that. But you'll have to compete. The hip, romantic-eyed 16-year-old says hello to someone every 10 feet as he walks the hallways of San Diego High School, sometimes stopping to exchange lively teen-age witticisms with friends. The real wonder is how he makes it to class on time. "I try to greet everybody that I can," he said. "And I try to make sure people know me for who I am."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1996
I read with sad fascination your article regarding the use of handicapped placards by valet parking attendants in Brentwood (Dec. 14). I have observed and reported similar misuse in Old Town Pasadena, all to no avail. However, the most insidious and obvious misuse of these placards is by the numerous stretch limos that sometimes occupy multiple handicapped spaces at the Los Angeles International Airport and other public facilities. Misuse of any state-issued license should be addressed aggressively and promptly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1993
As an employee at Ports O'Call in San Pedro, I was very happy to read about Sea Legs in the South Bay edition of Sunday's paper. Seeing as I live in Long Beach, I was sorry that it did not appear in our issue as well. In this day when all you hear about are businesses closing, it is so nice to know that there are still people out there willing to go out on a limb for what they believe in. Gianni Brill and Julie Cross have started something here that goes beyond the traditional business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1991 | BERNICE HIRABAYASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you see Alex Montoya and wonder about his prosthetic arms, go ahead and ask him what he's all about. He likes that. But you'll have to compete. The hip, romantic-eyed 16-year-old says hello to someone every 10 feet as he walks the hallways of San Diego High School, sometimes stopping to exchange lively teen-age witticisms with friends. The real wonder is how he makes it to class on time. "I try to greet everybody that I can," he said. "And I try to make sure people know me for who I am."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1991
I am writing about your article regarding the misuse of disabled parking placards (Metro, April 12). Recently, while walking on a major street in Beverly Hills, I counted eight Mercedes parked in a row and all had the disabled placard on the dash. At the time I figured the odds of finding eight disabled persons in Mercedes parked one after another were about as great as winning the lottery. It seems to me the way to prevent people from misusing the placards or loaning them to friends or family members is to issue a special license plate that would indicate the driver of the car is entitled to handicapped parking.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | RIP RENSE, Rense is a Sherman Oaks free-lance writer.
It's hard enough to write an autobiography, let alone write one in a foreign language. Add to that a crippling case of cerebral palsy, and the project approaches heroic proportions. Although those circumstances describe 19-year-old Matthew Kim, he doesn't think of himself as a hero. "Many American handicapped kids just don't know what they have, how lucky they are. They just give away their chances. Even normal people do the same thing," he said.
NEWS
September 25, 1987
What is the Latin equivalent of chutzpah? Deep in your story about the remarkable Tony Melendez, the thalidomide victim whose armless guitar performance so impressed Pope John Paul II at the Universal Amphitheatre, you report that his adolescent desire to become a priest was quashed when he "was turned down because of his handicap" ("A Star of the Papal Tour" by Beverly Beyette, Sept. 17). A few paragraphs later, while proudly extolling Melendez's talents, his priest, Father De Pasquale, declares: "We don't ever think of Tony as a handicapped person."
TRAVEL
August 5, 2012
I just read the piece about Barcelona, Spain, and the Stone Roses concerts and am compelled to write "Kudos to Kari Howard" ["Rock the Vacay," July 22]. Her style, the personality of her writing, the great unusual descriptions, all were so refreshing and engaging. Her words built such a vivid picture of her trip, the place, her feelings and excitement about it all. I've wanted to go to Barcelona, but now she's really put the hook in me. I look forward to reading more from her. Susan Emshwiller Eagle Rock :: For the record, Howard is not crazy.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | RIP RENSE, Rense is a Sherman Oaks free-lance writer.
It's hard enough to write an autobiography, let alone write one in a foreign language. Add to that a crippling case of cerebral palsy, and the project approaches heroic proportions. Although those circumstances describe 19-year-old Matthew Kim, he doesn't think of himself as a hero. "Many American handicapped kids just don't know what they have, how lucky they are. They just give away their chances. Even normal people do the same thing," he said.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
The article in the People's Daily was startling for its candor. "We have children who chase crippled people down the street and lob stones at them, or gather together to jeer and hoot. Not only children, but even some (Communist) party cadres sneer at handicapped people," the article said. "As far as handicapped people are concerned, China is relatively backward."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1985
This is in response to Patsy Smiley's letter (July 17), "$6 Fee." My husband doesn't mind paying $6 for a two-year parking permit for disabled persons. The part he minds is the time it takes to get it. First one must go the the Department of Motor Vehicles to get an official form. Then you take it to your doctor for his signature. Then you return to the DMV and stand in line from 1 1/2 hours to 2 hours to pay your $6 and get your permit. It is this standing in line that long that is hard on the handicapped person.
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