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Handicapped Russia

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January 13, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The question haunts Russia's disabled. Arkady Murashuv heard it years ago, when he applied to journalism school. An industrial accident had crushed his career in a metal factory. He thought he might learn a new trade, work from his bed editing copy or checking facts. The admissions committee turned him down. "You're sick," they told him. "You can't study. That's that." Behind the gruff rejection, Murashuv sensed the disbelief: Why bother working when you can collect a comfortable pension?
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NEWS
January 13, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The question haunts Russia's disabled. Arkady Murashuv heard it years ago, when he applied to journalism school. An industrial accident had crushed his career in a metal factory. He thought he might learn a new trade, work from his bed editing copy or checking facts. The admissions committee turned him down. "You're sick," they told him. "You can't study. That's that." Behind the gruff rejection, Murashuv sensed the disbelief: Why bother working when you can collect a comfortable pension?
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NEWS
February 1, 1998 | SARAH MAE BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Breathing heavily, Artur Petrov slowly negotiates himself and his wheelchair down the stairs from his fifth-floor apartment. There is no elevator. "Going down is not so bad," says Petrov, 26, who has been in a wheelchair since a motorcycle accident cost him the use of his legs 10 years ago. "But coming up is difficult. It usually takes me about half an hour." The disabled have never received much help in Russia, and a lack of government money in recent years has added to their hardships.
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