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Handicapped San Francisco

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NEWS
May 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A high school senior who has cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair has filed suit, charging that school officials are excluding her from the senior class picnic and a trip to Disneyland. "I'm very angry and frustrated," said 17-year-old Sascha Bittner. "It's kind of sad because I was really looking forward to my senior year." The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco by the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund of Berkeley on Bittner's behalf.
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NEWS
May 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A high school senior who has cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair has filed suit, charging that school officials are excluding her from the senior class picnic and a trip to Disneyland. "I'm very angry and frustrated," said 17-year-old Sascha Bittner. "It's kind of sad because I was really looking forward to my senior year." The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco by the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund of Berkeley on Bittner's behalf.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2002 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
Moji Duenas cannot read and may never learn to. Nor can the 18-year-old walk or speak or feed herself. She is incontinent. Convulsions sometimes rattle her body. Yet Moji is a high school student in the San Francisco Unified School District, taking most of her classes with teens en route to university. She is part of San Francisco's ambitious -- and sometimes painful -- effort to integrate most disabled students into regular classrooms.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With his wrap-around goggles and a one-pound belt pack, Tom Cleary looks as if he's about to play the latest virtual reality game. But the 73-year-old executive is doing something far more complicated: reading. Cleary suffers from macular degeneration, a condition in which fluid leaks into part of the eye, resulting in distorted vision and large blind spots. Although he can see well enough to maneuver around his office, his 20/400 vision classifies him as legally blind.
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