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BUSINESS
August 27, 1992 | Chris Woodyard, Times staff writer
Touching Gesture: A small thing can sometimes make all the difference. The 70 El Torito restaurants in Southern California have started offering Braille menus to blind patrons. The idea resulted from a brainstorming session on how the chain, based in Irvine, can better accommodate the handicapped. The response from blind guests, restaurant executives say, has already been overwhelming. "Tonight I had one the best experiences of my life at your restaurant," one diner wrote.
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BUSINESS
August 27, 1992 | Chris Woodyard, Times staff writer
Touching Gesture: A small thing can sometimes make all the difference. The 70 El Torito restaurants in Southern California have started offering Braille menus to blind patrons. The idea resulted from a brainstorming session on how the chain, based in Irvine, can better accommodate the handicapped. The response from blind guests, restaurant executives say, has already been overwhelming. "Tonight I had one the best experiences of my life at your restaurant," one diner wrote.
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NEWS
August 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The owners of an apartment complex have agreed in a consent order to pay $60,000 and ensure reasonable accommodations for a disabled Escondido woman, resolving a fair housing lawsuit filed by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Dolores D. Roberts, a physically disabled woman, filed a Fair Housing Act complaint with HUD alleging that she had been the victim of discrimination at her apartment complex, Quail Creek Apartments in Escondido.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the morning commute on RTD Line 483 and David Wolfe is riding shotgun for the blind. As the full bus trundles toward downtown Los Angeles from Pasadena, Wolfe sits in his familiar seat up front, alongside his guide dog, Ivy, and listens . What Wolfe does not hear bothers him. On a half-hour ride to Union Station, the driver only occasionally announces the bus's location, and in a mumble barely audible over traffic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the morning commute on RTD Line 483 and David Wolfe is riding shotgun for the blind. As the full bus trundles toward downtown Los Angeles from Pasadena, Wolfe sits in his familiar seat up front, alongside his guide dog, Ivy, and listens . What Wolfe does not hear bothers him. On a half-hour ride to Union Station, the driver only occasionally announces the bus's location, and in a mumble barely audible over traffic.
TRAVEL
December 28, 1986 | FRANK RILEY, Riley is travel columnist for Los Angeles magazine and a regular contributor to this section
The new ski year in the Southern California mountains began more than two weeks before Christmas, when fickle weather patterns were powdering the Rockies while leaving Sierra slopes virtually barren of snow. But Southern California ski slopes don't wait for nature's snow. More than $5 million was spent last summer to improve the slopes and prepare them for powdering by snow-making equipment rated among the best in the nation. Here at Big Bear, skiing started on Dec. 8.
NEWS
May 15, 1986 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
As dreams go, Bob Eastland's vision of a year-round sports camp for wheelchair athletes is about as ambitious as they come. Picture 85-plus acres of Orange County real estate. Then imagine a swimming pool, tennis courts, a bowling alley, rifle and archery ranges, horseback-riding trails and a lake for fishing. The dream even has a name--Camp Whe Cha Pines. "Whe Cha stands for wheelchair," Eastland explains. And Pines? "We plan to have a lot of pine trees," he says with a grin.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The owners of an apartment complex have agreed in a consent order to pay $60,000 and ensure reasonable accommodations for a disabled Escondido woman, resolving a fair housing lawsuit filed by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Dolores D. Roberts, a physically disabled woman, filed a Fair Housing Act complaint with HUD alleging that she had been the victim of discrimination at her apartment complex, Quail Creek Apartments in Escondido.
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