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Handicapped Students

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1988 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
After eight days of bus shortages for handicapped students, the Orange County Department of Education said Wednesday that a solution has been reached with the bus contractor. But it will be several more days before all buses return to normal, contractor Larry Durham said, adding: "Getting drivers back on all routes is not going to happen overnight."
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WORLD
March 6, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - Her neighborhood on the outskirts of this capital city is a dangerous, gang-infested barrio where homes are often made of corrugated tin and other collected refuse. It is by no means the ideal place to raise a family. But Taina Carrillo, a 35-year-old homemaker, said the slum of Petare was even worse before Hugo Chavez took over Venezuela. "Now we have a three-story medical clinic in the middle of the barrio," said Carrillo, one of hundreds of thousands of mourners who packed Caracas on Wednesday, crying and chanting as the coffin containing their fallen leader was pulled through the streets.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988
It has been three weeks since handicapped students were first stranded without adequate bus transportation, and still the bus shortage continues. And, as county Department of Education officials acknowledge, no immediate solution is in sight. While everyone points the finger of blame at someone else, about 10% of the bus routes still remain without service. And although some students are using private transportation, others haven't been able to get to school at all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1996 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Excelling in the tomato throw, the radish relay and the water balloon toss won't earn the contender a ticket to the Olympics. But the enthusiasm of competitors in this week's Special Camp for Special Kids at St. Margaret's Episcopal School rivaled that in Atlanta. The weeklong program for mentally and physically disabled students in Orange County gives them a chance to participate in an American tradition: going to summer camp. "It's a great experience for everyone," said Joyce Balak of the St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1987
About 5,000 disabled high school and college students are expected to attend the annual Career Awareness Day for the Handicapped on March 18 at the Anaheim Convention Center. The event, which will be held from 8:30 a.m. to noon, is sponsored by the Orange County Department of Education in conjunction with the Anaheim Union High School District. Employers have booths at the event, and they provide handicapped students with information about an array of jobs that are available.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1988 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Parents of many handicapped children taught by the Orange County Department of Education had to drive them to school Wednesday as a bus shortage entered its third day--with no resolution in sight. "We're hoping the number of buses will be increased tomorrow, but we're not sure," department Assistant Supt. Fred Koch said Wednesday. "We were promised more buses today, but we didn't get them."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1988 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of handicapped students were left stranded this week when the bus company hired to transport them told Orange County Board of Education officials that the firm could not find enough drivers. Robert D. Peterson, the superintendent for county schools, which have 800 special-needs students, said the problem started Monday and continued Tuesday, with parents providing some emergency transit. He said no solution was in sight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene Friday in Downey was a close encounter of a special kind. A blind man was trying to explain to an audience of deaf teen-agers how to distinguish the sound that comes from pulsars from other outer space noise picked up by radio telescopes aimed at the skies. And he was succeeding. Communications challenges are nothing new to Kent Cullers, the man who has designed equipment that may someday allow extraterrestrials to communicate with earthlings.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | DAWN STONE, Dawn Stone is a senior at El Toro High School, where she is editor of the student news magazine, The BullETin, Keywanette treasurer and a member of the Orange County Academic Decathlon team.
If Peterson Santos or Darin French walked the halls of a typical high school, many students would feel uncomfortable and possibly avert their eyes. Some of the friendlier ones might offer them a smile, and, if no one were looking, perhaps even say hello. Santos, 18, and French, 20, are special students who attend a special school--Esperanza School. Established in 1973, Esperanza--Spanish for hope --educates 117 trainable mentally handicapped students--from preschoolers to adults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1986 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Yasu Shido got his first electric wheelchair the other day. The 9-year-old put his withered left hand on the control toggle and promptly crashed into a bookcase. Yasu, who has cerebral palsy, has very limited control of his arms. Every movement is a struggle; the wheelchair veers from side to side but gets there. He is able to communicate through only a few sounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1996
I read your May 19 article about the fully included Down syndrome boy at Santa Ana High School. As the psychologist at El Dorado High School in the Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District, I am very proud of the program we have developed based on the inclusion model of mainstreaming special education students. At El Dorado, we have approximately 20 students who fall into the categories of educationally retarded and multiply handicapped. Our students are mainstreamed four or five (out of six)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1995 | YVETTE CABRERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alfonso Gutierrez never considered that it could happen to him. Two years ago, when he built ramps at the Regional Occupational Program center here, all he envisioned was how the center's wheelchair-bound students would have easier access to the facility. But now Gutierrez, 25, knows firsthand about the challenges of getting around and overcoming a disability. He is using the very ramps he crafted with his hands. Shortly after he built the ramps, he went to Mexico to help a friend move.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1994 | BILL BILLITER
The Huntington Beach City School District Board of Trustees has unanimously voted to oppose pending state legislation that would make it harder to expel unruly handicapped students. The trustees voted 5 to 0 at their meeting last week for a resolution that opposes any new law "which requires school districts to provide educational services to handicapped children after they are expelled, even when it is determined that the conduct was not a manifestation of the child's handicap."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene Friday in Downey was a close encounter of a special kind. A blind man was trying to explain to an audience of deaf teen-agers how to distinguish the sound that comes from pulsars from other outer space noise picked up by radio telescopes aimed at the skies. And he was succeeding. Communications challenges are nothing new to Kent Cullers, the man who has designed equipment that may someday allow extraterrestrials to communicate with earthlings.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal investigators have reported that the Montebello Unified School District violated the rights of handicapped students by segregating them and providing them with less instruction than other students. In an agreement this month with the Office for Civil Rights, Montebello officials acknowledged that their program did not comply with federal law and said all the problems would be corrected. Some of the segregation problems were at Rosewood Park Elementary in Commerce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Students at Orange Coast College barely catch a glimpse of Jeff Smithling as he streaks through the campus on his skateboard, his stocky dog Lightning pulling him along like a husky hauling a sled. "He roars through campus--his dog is so strong," said Bob Zhe, a counselor at the college's Disabled Student Center. "He buzzes through here." Smithling has suffered from an arthritic disease since birth that rendered his legs unusable.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal investigators have reported that the Montebello Unified School District violated the rights of handicapped students by segregating them and providing them with less instruction than other students. In an agreement this month with the Office for Civil Rights, Montebello officials acknowledged that their program did not comply with federal law and said all the problems would be corrected. Some of the segregation problems were at Rosewood Park Elementary in Commerce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1991
A free workshop on discrimination and the handicapped will be held today at Chapman College. Gail Sakowski, an attorney for the U.S. Office of Civil Rights, will discuss a federal law barring discrimination against handicapped students and providing services to them. The public conference is of special interest to parents, school personnel and advocates who are involved in the education of handicapped students. It will be held in Hashinger Lecture Hall from 1 to 5 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1991 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an emergency room doctor and health care executive, Henry W. Lubow typically divides his day between taking care of patients and administering his health care corporation and its five subsidiaries. But earlier this week, the Van Nuys-based businessman found himself at William Anderson School in Lawndale, fielding questions from a class of deaf students between the ages of 8 and 12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1991 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Office of Education has violated federal law by isolating dozens of mentally handicapped students in special schools when they could have been educated on regular campuses, an investigation has found. The U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights also found that handicapped students at the special schools attended class for less time than regular students in nearby school districts, another violation of anti-discrimination laws.
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