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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1994
The Orange County Transportation Authority decided Monday to postpone a vote on the future of the Dial-a-Ride program until June 27. The transportation agency is considering discontinuing the same-day taxi service for seniors to free up funds for a disabled riders' program. Elderly Dial-a-Ride users swamped an OCTA meeting earlier this month, requesting that the board not pit senior citizens against disabled riders.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Transit officials today are expected to approve funding to replace 78 aging minibuses used primarily for the disabled. The special vehicles, which follow fixed routes across Orange County, are also used to take passengers from Metrolink train stations to parking areas and other locations. Their most extensive use, however, is by those with disabilities, said George Urch, a spokesman for the Orange County Transit Authority.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1992 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rack on top of Robert Rohan's minivan used to carry his bicycle. Now, it sometimes secures his wheelchair. Air bags are not in the front of this van, but in the rear, where they help operate the hydraulic system that lowers a ramp. A star triathlete at El Camino Real High School in Woodland Hills in the late 1980s, Rohan suffered a broken neck in a 1989 bicycle accident, leaving him with limited use of his arms and no feeling below his mid-chest area.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly eight months after Gov. Gray Davis announced that he would give up the state's fight to charge disabled drivers for their parking placards, he has yet to withdraw an appeal he filed with the U.S. Supreme Court in the case. Nor has a penny been paid to disabled Californians who were charged the $6 fee. The dispute has triggered a case of finger-pointing between the Davis administration and the attorney representing the disabled in settlement talks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
A group of activists for disabled rights steered their wheelchairs into Greyhound's downtown terminal Monday afternoon, disrupting busy Labor Day bus travel in an attempt to pressure the transit giant into improving access for the disabled. The half-hour show of civil disobedience ended with police hoisting three protesters into the back of a police van. Moments earlier, their wheelchairs had been backed against the fenders of departing buses, their voices raised in singing "We Shall Overcome."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City of Hope does it. The Democrats do it. UCLA academic benefactors do it. So when Kendall Severson needed money for a cause dear to her heart, she cooked up plans for a benefit dinner, too. She talked a chef into donating the use of his restaurant. Talked a band into providing entertainment. Talked local merchants into donating raffle prizes. Talked an artist into designing invitations. Talked a copy shop into printing them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 966-5848
Bus service will become more accessible for the disabled when workers widen pathways, curbs and clearances at 43 locations throughout the city. The $58,512 for the project, an effort to comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act, will come from the Orange County Transportation Authority's Bus Stop Accessibility Program.
SPORTS
February 3, 1998 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the kind of drama you will never find on a golf course, regardless of the magnitude of the event. Casey Martin, the promising young golfer who has spent the last several months trying to convince the world that he should be allowed to ride in a cart while competing professionally, hobbled into court Monday in Eugene, Ore., and graphically embarked on a campaign to convince the federal magistrate who ultimately will decide his fate.
SPORTS
February 5, 1998 | From Associated Press
Casey Martin broke down in tears Wednesday as he testified about the intense pain he feels when he walks the golf course. "If I could trade my leg and a cart for their good leg, I would do it any time, anywhere," said Martin, who has sued the PGA Tour for the right to ride a cart. Under gentle questioning from his lawyer, Martin gave a detailed description of the rare circulatory condition he has lived with since birth. "It feels like my leg is going to blow up," he said.
SPORTS
February 5, 1998 | Jim Murray, Times Staff Writer
OK, if they let Casey Martin play in golf tournaments in a cart, first of all, they have to let every player ride one. You see, being able to ride is an incalculable advantage. The whole point of golf is being able to concentrate. Your ability to concentrate wanes the more tired you get. Anyone who thinks fatigue doesn't enter into golf doesn't know golf. Period. Not muscle fatigue, mental fatigue. The fourth major golf tournament, the PGA Championship, used to be match play.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Settling a federal class-action lawsuit, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority agreed Monday to improve service to riders who use wheelchairs Under terms of the pact, approved by U.S. District Judge Consuelo B. Marshall, an independent firm will be hired to monitor the agency's compliance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disabled commuters sued in federal court Thursday, demanding improvements in shuttle services used by 40,000 people with disabilities in Los Angeles County. The lawsuit, filed by the Western Law Center for Disability Rights, the ACLU and Protection and Advocacy Inc. cited accounts that commuters who use wheelchairs have been left stranded in dangerous places because shuttle vans arrived hours late or not at all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2000 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time, the familiar white vans of Access Services, which provide shuttle services for 40,000 disabled people in cities throughout Los Angeles County, were not late. "Right on time," said Audrey Harthorn, one of nearly two dozen demonstrators in wheelchairs who temporarily laid siege to the 74-story Library Tower building in downtown Los Angeles, where the shuttle service's office is located. "They want to get rid of us." Indeed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From across the city, they arrived using walkers, wheelchairs or canes. In sometimes painfully slow speech, the message was repeated passionately Thursday to the city's Commission on Disability: We often feel like second-class citizens on buses, cabs and other public transportation. Cabs refuse to stop for the blind with seeing-eye dogs, all bus lifts can't accommodate all wheelchairs, and many transit services run hours late, stranding clients in the rain and late at night.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1999 | Reuters
Greyhound Lines Inc., the nation's largest bus firm, agreed to improve service for passengers with disabilities, resolving complaints that its drivers and other employees violated an antidiscrimination law, the Justice Department said. It added that the out-of-court agreement resolved complaints alleging that passengers with disabilities were denied boarding assistance, sustained injuries while being physically carried on and off buses and were verbally harassed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1999 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of a recent workday, a trickle of county employees returned to their cars parked at the Hill Street overpass in downtown Los Angeles, unaware that they were being watched by two members of a special parking enforcement team. About half of the two dozen vehicles had blue handicapped permits hanging from rearview mirrors or lying on dashboards, allowing their owners to park free all day at two-hour meters that cost everyone else $1.50 an hour.
SPORTS
February 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
Attacking the argument that golf carts give players an unfair advantage, Casey Martin's lawyers put on witnesses Tuesday who said carts neither improve performance nor provide relief from great fatigue. "I prefer to walk," said Eric Johnson, the Nike Tour's leading money winner. "It helps me with my rhythm. You get a full effect of the elements."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1995
Long Beach transit officials say they simply wanted to shorten the wait for customers who ride one of the city's busiest bus routes. They never guessed elderly and disabled customers who use a different route would raise such a fuss. So officials of the city's bus service this week scrapped their plan to cut short a bus line that runs from Long Beach's east end to a Blue Line station on the city's west side.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 966-5848
Bus service will become more accessible for the disabled when workers widen pathways, curbs and clearances at 43 locations throughout the city. The $58,512 for the project, an effort to comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act, will come from the Orange County Transportation Authority's Bus Stop Accessibility Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1999
Despite a warning from a former Los Angeles transportation commissioner and public misgivings about quality of service, Orange County officials Monday broke with standing policy and hired a single company to provide small bus and van service--including programs for the disabled and seniors. Awarding the $93-million contract to Laidlaw Transit Services Inc.
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