Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHandicapped United States
IN THE NEWS

Handicapped United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crawling up the Capitol steps to dramatize the barriers confronting them, scores of disabled persons rallied Monday to protest delays in congressional action on a Senate-passed bill to expand their access to jobs, transportation and public services. The legislation, endorsed by President Bush, has broad bipartisan backing but has been moving at glacial speed through four House committees since it was approved overwhelmingly by the Senate last September.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 1996 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Bob Dole, man with disability, runs for president in 1996, the ailment is old, but the discussion of it is new. The old reminders: He rarely eats in public; it is too hard. He does not shake hands; his right arm, shattered in World War II, does not work. He autographs copies of his new book for just a few moments, then hands out hundreds of pre-signed tomes. The new embrace: He talks about the Americans With Disabilities Act with greater frequency and increasing pride.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1994 | from Associated Press
No one in Ginny Thornburgh's church ever asked why she left her third son at home during Sunday worship. They didn't ask about the mentally retarded boy, and she assumed he would be unwelcome. But just how little her church cared about her disabled child became clear when Thornburgh's fourth child was born. This baby was not handicapped, and her fellow congregants told her all about the nursery and implored her to bring the child. "That's when it hit me, and I've never rested since," she said.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a Justice Department settlement that may set a standard for the car rental industry, Avis Inc. agreed Thursday to provide autos with hand controls for customers with disabilities. Department officials said the voluntary settlement came after complaints were filed against Avis, the nation's second-largest car rental company, and 10 other rental car firms by people who said they were being denied service in violation of the Americans With Disabilities Act. U.S. Atty. Gen.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Senate on Wednesday endorsed a change in a major civil rights bill to allow AIDS sufferers to be reassigned from food-handling duties. The vote was an election-year victory for Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) and a setback for Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.). Helms is seeking a fourth term in office.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House negotiators on landmark civil rights legislation for the disabled agreed Monday to scrap a provision that would have allowed employers to transfer food handlers with the AIDS virus to other jobs if the public perceived a health risk. The controversial amendment, deleted from the legislation by a narrow 12-10 vote of House conferees, was one of the last obstacles to final congressional approval of the bill and its signing into law by President Bush this week. But Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting with rare bipartisan accord, the House gave its final approval Thursday to legislation that would guarantee an estimated 43 million disabled persons the same job rights and access to public facilities enjoyed by other Americans. The Senate is expected to approve the bill today and send it to President Bush, who has said he will sign it.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
President Bush said Thursday that he will not tolerate bias in hiring but also will not accept a civil rights bill that imposes quotas on employers. Sens. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) and John C. Danforth (R-Mo.) quickly unveiled a compromise amendment intended to deal with his objections to the bill. But the White House and Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) said it failed to remove their concerns.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Transportation Department announced Friday that most public and private transportation systems will be required to meet the needs of disabled people, regardless of whether they receive federal money. The new regulations, parts of which will be phased in through 1995, are designed to codify the transportation sector's obligations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, which was signed by President Bush last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1991 | FRANK MESSINA
Within 20 years, Orange County and the rest of the United States will be changed dramatically by recent federal legislation that will do for the disabled community what the Civil Rights Act did for minorities, the national director of United Cerebral Palsy Assn. said Friday during a visit to the organization's Santa Ana office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1994 | from Associated Press
No one in Ginny Thornburgh's church ever asked why she left her third son at home during Sunday worship. They didn't ask about the mentally retarded boy, and she assumed he would be unwelcome. But just how little her church cared about her disabled child became clear when Thornburgh's fourth child was born. This baby was not handicapped, and her fellow congregants told her all about the nursery and implored her to bring the child. "That's when it hit me, and I've never rested since," she said.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | JAY MATHEWS, THE WASHINGTON POST
The quiet effort to take the child away from Leigh Campbell-Earl and Bill Earl began, as such cases often do, with an anonymous telephone call to county social services workers: There is a woman in East Lansing, Mich., about to have a baby, the caller said, and she is far too disabled to care for it. Her husband uses a wheelchair, too. Shouldn't the county investigate? No one knows how many people with severe disabilities are becoming parents.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | SUSAN HARRIGAN, NEWSDAY
The annual muscular dystrophy telethon is supposed to be a "Labor Day Love-In"--a sentimental and entertaining fund-raiser that collected more than $45 million last year for research and treatment of 40 neuromuscular diseases, according to its longtime unpaid host, comedian Jerry Lewis. But behind the scenes, the love-in is beginning to look more like a war.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1992 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After being stuck at the office until 2 a.m. recently, Jeffrey Stordahl got into a miserable fix on the drive home. His gas tank was nearly empty. Even though some self-service gas stations were open, that wasn't much help: Stordahl, 32, is paralyzed from the waist down, and despite his youth and vigor, filling his car's tank by himself is an ordeal.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Transportation Department announced Friday that most public and private transportation systems will be required to meet the needs of disabled people, regardless of whether they receive federal money. The new regulations, parts of which will be phased in through 1995, are designed to codify the transportation sector's obligations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, which was signed by President Bush last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1991 | FRANK MESSINA
Within 20 years, Orange County and the rest of the United States will be changed dramatically by recent federal legislation that will do for the disabled community what the Civil Rights Act did for minorities, the national director of United Cerebral Palsy Assn. said Friday during a visit to the organization's Santa Ana office.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration and key senators agreed Wednesday to a comprehensive measure that would extend civil rights protections to disabled Americans. The Americans with Disabilities Act was approved unanimously by the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee and is expected to be approved by the full Senate.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In a sweeping expansion of civil rights protections, the Senate late Thursday voted to bar discrimination against 43 million disabled Americans in employment, public transportation services, public accommodations and telecommunication services. The landmark measure was adopted on a vote of 76 to 8 after a day of debate.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was an empty wheelchair in the back row and somebody said that the occupant must have gotten up and walked on the waves of emotion as about 2,000 disabled Americans cheered the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act by President Bush on Thursday. "I never felt so powerful as today. We've finally got the country listening to us," declared an ebullient Roberta Stein, whose dog stood by her wheelchair during ceremonies on the South Lawn of the White House.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting with rare bipartisan accord, the House gave its final approval Thursday to legislation that would guarantee an estimated 43 million disabled persons the same job rights and access to public facilities enjoyed by other Americans. The Senate is expected to approve the bill today and send it to President Bush, who has said he will sign it.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|