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BUSINESS
January 15, 2001 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two of the region's largest ocean-shipping lines plan to relocate most of their local administrative operations out of state within the next several weeks in what industry observers say is a move to cut costs and consolidate clerical functions and an attempt to elude a powerful labor union working to organize office employees at both companies. The relocations are expected to affect scores of clerical and administrative workers at Hanjin Shipping Co.'
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BUSINESS
January 15, 2001 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two of the region's largest ocean-shipping lines plan to relocate most of their local administrative operations out of state within the next several weeks in what industry observers say is a move to cut costs and consolidate clerical functions and an attempt to elude a powerful labor union working to organize office employees at both companies. The relocations are expected to affect scores of clerical and administrative workers at Hanjin Shipping Co.'
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BUSINESS
March 16, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of Long Beach on Wednesday said it signed an agreement with a major South Korean shipping line to operate a 375-acre cargo terminal on the site of the former Long Beach Naval Station. That site was the focus of a bitter fight two years ago when the port tried to lease the historic base to a firm owned by the Chinese government. If completed, the deal with the Hanjin Shipping Co.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of Long Beach on Wednesday said it signed an agreement with a major South Korean shipping line to operate a 375-acre cargo terminal on the site of the former Long Beach Naval Station. That site was the focus of a bitter fight two years ago when the port tried to lease the historic base to a firm owned by the Chinese government. If completed, the deal with the Hanjin Shipping Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1995
Officials from the Port of Long Beach and Hanjin Shipping have broken ground on what should eventually be the largest container terminal in the largest container port in the country. The 170-acre terminal will have an expansive wharf, two-thirds of a mile long, capable of handling the new mega-container ships, which can carry 2,500 40-foot cargo boxes. It will have six huge gantry cranes, as well as space for two 8,000-foot-long freight trains on dockside rails.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1996
Engineering and construction services specialist Holmes & Narver Inc. said it has been awarded a contract for design and engineering of a $10-million, 170-acre cargo container transfer facility at the Port of Long Beach. The facility, for South Korea's Hanjin Shipping Co., will handle the transfer of rail car containers among rail lines, trucks and ships at the port. Completion of the project is scheduled for mid-1997.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1995
The Port of Long Beach has agreed to construct a $250-million terminal and lease it to one of Asia's largest shipping companies. Under the arrangement, South Korea-based Hanjin Shipping Co. will pay at least $19 million a year for 15 years to use the terminal, company officials said. The new terminal is slated for a 170-acre parcel of land at Pier A, the site of a former oil field north of the port's Cerritos Channel.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2005 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
The Port of Long Beach has lately endured severe congestion, a dockworker shortage and torrential rain that damaged connecting rail lines. It was rewarded Friday with an improved outlook by Moody's Investors Service. Moody's bumped up the port's long-term debt outlook to positive from stable, representing the rating service's assessment of the harbor's financial health. Moody's also assigned a rating of Aa3 to the port's new California Harbor Revenue Refunding Bonds, Series 2005A and 2005B.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2007 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
At a 170-acre complex dotted with more than two dozen hangars, Korean Air operates a little-known aerospace division that develops rockets and satellites and makes parts for commercial and military aircraft. It is the only airline in the world that also has an aircraft manufacturing business. Even within the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1989 | GEORGE WHITE, Times Staff Writer
The departure of a major tenant could create problems at some ports. When executives at Overseas Shipping Co. announced plans to abandon a large operation at the Port of Los Angeles, however, a difficult situation was actually resolved. The predicament arose when port officials decided to ask one tenant to vacate its site to make room for Overseas. The tenant, which was to be moved when its lease expired this summer, challenged the plan. The dispute over space was settled only when Overseas decided to discontinue its operations at the port.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1995
Officials from the Port of Long Beach and Hanjin Shipping have broken ground on what should eventually be the largest container terminal in the largest container port in the country. The 170-acre terminal will have an expansive wharf, two-thirds of a mile long, capable of handling the new mega-container ships, which can carry 2,500 40-foot cargo boxes. It will have six huge gantry cranes, as well as space for two 8,000-foot-long freight trains on dockside rails.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2006 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
To the casual observer, a disaster is about to occur at the Port of Long Beach. The South Korean containership Pohang Senator, more than two football fields long and heavy with retail goods from Asia, is nearing its parallel parking space at the port. But the Hanjin Shipping Co. vessel is moving too fast, its bow is pointed in the wrong direction and it is closing on the rocks at the base of its pier.
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