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Hankus Netsky

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1993 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, Donna Perlmutter writes regularly about music for The Times
Hankus Netsky is a pushover for nostalgia. If it's old and forgotten and retro, he's bound to be its champion. Take, for instance, the music of his Klezmer Conservatory Band, opening a four-day run Saturday at the University of Judaism in Bel-Air. It comes from the shtetls of Eastern Europe, brought to New York's Lower East Side in the 1920s by Jewish immigrants with pushcarts. Hearty music. Sad music. Infectious music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It must be a small world, after all, if traditions as distant as raging Orange County surf-rock and klezmer, the folk music of vanished Jewish villages of Eastern and Central Europe, can intersect. The point of unlikely conjunction is "Miserlou." Dick Dale's epic version from 1963 is one of rock's instrumental classics; its fast, pummeling guitar attack zoomed back into mass-public consciousness when Quentin Tarantino made it the theme music for 1994's "Pulp Fiction."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It must be a small world, after all, if traditions as distant as raging Orange County surf-rock and klezmer, the folk music of vanished Jewish villages of Eastern and Central Europe, can intersect. The point of unlikely conjunction is "Miserlou." Dick Dale's epic version from 1963 is one of rock's instrumental classics; its fast, pummeling guitar attack zoomed back into mass-public consciousness when Quentin Tarantino made it the theme music for 1994's "Pulp Fiction."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1993 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, Donna Perlmutter writes regularly about music for The Times
Hankus Netsky is a pushover for nostalgia. If it's old and forgotten and retro, he's bound to be its champion. Take, for instance, the music of his Klezmer Conservatory Band, opening a four-day run Saturday at the University of Judaism in Bel-Air. It comes from the shtetls of Eastern Europe, brought to New York's Lower East Side in the 1920s by Jewish immigrants with pushcarts. Hearty music. Sad music. Infectious music.
NEWS
May 30, 1985 | From Reuters
Four Americans have been expelled from the Soviet Union after a meeting and impromptu concert with a group of Soviet Georgian human rights activists, the U.S. Embassy said today. A spokesman said the four, whom he would not identify, left Moscow on Wednesday. They were not given any reason for their expulsion, and U.S. officials are waiting for information from the Soviet Foreign Ministry. The U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2013 | By Richard S. Ginell
In March 2011, Itzhak Perlman turned up at a hastily arranged concert in the Saban Theatre, re-exploring his Jewish roots in tandem with the Klezmer Conservatory Band and a force of nature named Cantor Yitzchak Meir Helfgot.  At the time, they hoped to take the show on the road, as well as make a recording. And so they have.  A sampling of their repertoire, “Eternal Echoes,” was issued on a Sony CD a year ago this month. And back to Los Angeles they came Tuesday night, this time to the big concrete outdoors of Hollywood Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Robert Brustein, the esteemed critic and artistic director at the American Repertory Theatre, has many talents. Comedy is not chief among them. His idea for a klezmer musical based on a play by Isaac Bashevis Singer (which in turn was based on Singer's stories for children) resulted in "Shlemiel the First," which opened Wednesday night at the Geffen Playhouse in Westwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1998
You've seen the movie, now hear the music. Singer-songwriter Ian Whitcomb and his White Star Orchestra will perform "Music From the Titanic," melodies heard aboard the RMS Titanic on the luxury liner's ill-fated voyage (and on Whitcomb's album "Titanic--Music as Heard on the Fateful Voyage"). * "Music From the Titanic," Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino. Open seating. Free with museum admission. Adults, $8.
BOOKS
July 23, 1995 | ALLAN M. JALON
This summer, Leonard Nimoy, Walter Matthau and Lauren Bacall are giving performances that are out of this world. They are conjuring other worlds that have vanished or never quite existed, which flash to life full of joy, suffering and strange transformations, which rarely finish without ambiguity or irony. This is the realm of "Jewish Short Stories From Eastern Europe and Beyond," a series of 13 radio programs--every Sunday at 6 p.m.--which recently started on KCRW.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In concert halls around the world, the Klezmer Conservatory Band has not only brought audiences to their feet but has consistently left them dancing in the aisles, boasts the back cover of the Boston-based Yiddish music ensemble's latest album, "Dancing in the Aisles." Such chutzpah. Didn't they know they might someday have to play at the Irvine Barclay Theatre?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1994 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a free-lance writer based in New York. and
One of the hippest records to have come out this year is a CD resurrection of goofy early Spike Jones recordings. Spike Jones was the drummer from Long Beach who played in radio bands in the 1930s and then, in the early '40s, set out on his own as a musical satirist, famous for making lots of nerdy noises to parody popular songs, with his band, Spike Jones & the City Slickers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1997 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
As a playwright, actor, director, teacher, artistic director, critic and author of 11 books, Robert Brustein for three decades has been one of the most versatile men in the American theater. He also is one of the most influential--and controversial.
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