Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHanlester Network
IN THE NEWS

Hanlester Network

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 19, 1991 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials won an important legal victory Wednesday in an Orange County case likely to fuel the government's escalating crackdown on questionable financial relationships among doctors, hospitals and medical testing laboratories. The ruling by an administrative law panel of the U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 19, 1991 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials won an important legal victory Wednesday in an Orange County case likely to fuel the government's escalating crackdown on questionable financial relationships among doctors, hospitals and medical testing laboratories. The ruling by an administrative law panel of the U.S.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 12, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government, in a case involving a Santa Ana-based clinical laboratory concern, suffered a major setback to its efforts to crack down on what it considers self-dealing by physicians. Richard P. Kusserow, inspector general for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, charged that three clinical laboratories in California operated by the Hanlester Network were paying illegal kickbacks to doctors who invested in the facilities and steered patients to them.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government, trying to limit what it sees as self-dealing by physicians, has issued a new set of regulations to restrict doctors from referring Medicare and Medicaid patients to health care facilities in which they have a financial stake. The so-called "safe harbor" restrictions are guidelines that spell out what is considered a clearly safe business relationship between doctors and medical facilities, such as clinical labs or imaging centers, where X-rays are taken. The U.S.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government, trying to limit what it sees as self-dealing by physicians, has issued a new set of regulations to restrict doctors from referring Medicare and Medicaid patients to health care facilities in which they have a financial stake. The so-called "safe harbor" restrictions are guidelines that spell out what is considered a clearly safe business relationship between doctors and medical facilities, such as clinical labs or imaging centers, where X-rays are taken. The U.S.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
SmithKline Beecham Clinical Laboratories Inc. has agreed to pay $1.5 million to settle a federal investigation of alleged kickbacks for physicians who referred Medicare and Medicaid business to the company, the government said Thursday. The Department of Health and Human Services' inspector general found that more than 100 physicians were investors in three California laboratories managed by the company, including facilities in Pasadena and Santa Ana.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | IRENE WIELAWSKI and CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stung by competition for patients, heart doctors on the Stanford University faculty last spring came up with their own marketing ploy. They decided to offer red-carpet courtesies and perks--including an annual retreat at a posh Pebble Beach resort--to doctors who referred patients to Stanford's hospital. To qualify for these privileges, the referring doctors had to promise to "refer the majority, if not all, of their patients for cardiac catheterization and/or cardiovascular surgery to the . . .
BUSINESS
March 12, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government, in a case involving a Santa Ana-based clinical laboratory concern, suffered a major setback to its efforts to crack down on what it considers self-dealing by physicians. Richard P. Kusserow, inspector general for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, charged that three clinical laboratories in California operated by the Hanlester Network were paying illegal kickbacks to doctors who invested in the facilities and steered patients to them.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|