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Hanna Suchocka

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NEWS
July 9, 1992 | From Reuters
President Lech Walesa asked Parliament on Wednesday to approve Hanna Suchocka as Poland's first woman prime minister after she ended weeks of political deadlock by mustering a new majority coalition. In a letter to the Sejm, or lower house, Walesa also asked for the dismissal of Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak, who had earlier offered to step down after his failure to form a government, the presidential office said in a statement.
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NEWS
May 29, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Lech Walesa weighed whether to dissolve Poland's first democratically elected Parliament after a no-confidence vote brought down the government Friday. Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka's year-old centrist government fell victim to the political jousting that has plagued Parliament's 20-odd parties. The vote plunged Poland into political chaos that appeared likely to delay economic reforms and damage its international prestige.
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NEWS
July 11, 1992 | From Associated Press
Parliament on Friday approved centrist lawmaker Hanna Suchocka as the first woman to head a Polish government, ending the nation's five-week political crisis. In a vote of 233 to 61 with 113 abstentions, the Sejm, or lower chamber, approved Suchocka as the fifth prime minister since the Communists lost power in 1989. Hours earlier, the chamber had accepted the resignation of Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | Associated Press
Parliamentary deputies on Saturday approved the Cabinet of new Prime Minister Hanna ending a five-week impasse that had left Poland virtually without a government. Suchocka's 22-member Cabinet is backed by a coalition of seven parties descended from Solidarity, the trade union movement that forced the Communists out of power in 1989. The Finance Ministry and other key economic posts are held by politicians who favor pressing on with Poland's bold market-oriented reforms.
NEWS
May 29, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Lech Walesa weighed whether to dissolve Poland's first democratically elected Parliament after a no-confidence vote brought down the government Friday. Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka's year-old centrist government fell victim to the political jousting that has plagued Parliament's 20-odd parties. The vote plunged Poland into political chaos that appeared likely to delay economic reforms and damage its international prestige.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | Associated Press
Parliamentary deputies on Saturday approved the Cabinet of new Prime Minister Hanna ending a five-week impasse that had left Poland virtually without a government. Suchocka's 22-member Cabinet is backed by a coalition of seven parties descended from Solidarity, the trade union movement that forced the Communists out of power in 1989. The Finance Ministry and other key economic posts are held by politicians who favor pressing on with Poland's bold market-oriented reforms.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | Reuters
A 46-year-old lawyer was the leading candidate to become Poland's first woman prime minister Saturday. Hanna Suchocka, a member of the Democratic Union party, won the widest support in overnight negotiations attended by eight parties. The incumbent prime minister, Waldemar Pawlak, resigned last week after failing to put together a coalition.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Parliament rejected a privatization plan Thursday, dealing the coalition government its worst defeat and leaving Poland without a framework for the mass privatization of large state enterprises. Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka exchanged a shocked look with her Cabinet members when Parliament rejected the measure 203-181, with nine deputies abstaining. Defections and absences by about 25 coalition deputies sank it.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Lech Walesa dissolved Poland's first democratically elected Parliament on Saturday, a day after lawmakers brought down the government in a no-confidence vote. He refused to accept the resignation of Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka, deciding instead to disband the Parliament where 20-odd bickering parties have made forming a stable government impossible. Walesa must schedule elections within three or four months, two years early.
NEWS
June 29, 1993
"No country treats its women as well as it treats its men, a disappointing result sfter so many years of gender equality, so many struggles by women and so may changes in national laws," concludes a new U.N. report. But women do hold positions of power in many counyties. Women in Parliament "We're half the people; we should be half the Congress," said Jeanette Rankin (R-Mont.), elected in 1916 as the first U.S. congresswoman. But nowhere in the world is this true, by one survey. Finland, at 38.
NEWS
July 11, 1992 | From Associated Press
Parliament on Friday approved centrist lawmaker Hanna Suchocka as the first woman to head a Polish government, ending the nation's five-week political crisis. In a vote of 233 to 61 with 113 abstentions, the Sejm, or lower chamber, approved Suchocka as the fifth prime minister since the Communists lost power in 1989. Hours earlier, the chamber had accepted the resignation of Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak.
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | From Reuters
President Lech Walesa asked Parliament on Wednesday to approve Hanna Suchocka as Poland's first woman prime minister after she ended weeks of political deadlock by mustering a new majority coalition. In a letter to the Sejm, or lower house, Walesa also asked for the dismissal of Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak, who had earlier offered to step down after his failure to form a government, the presidential office said in a statement.
NEWS
September 18, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just four years after the celebrated collapse of communism in Poland, the so-called invisible hand of capitalism is about to get slapped. Fed up with the stresses and strains of building a market economy from the shambles of communism, Poles are poised to do the seemingly unthinkable Sunday: elect a government with roots in the haunted past.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | MAGDALENA KULIG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Poland's chronic inability to give suspects speedy trials turned into a blessing for five archivists charged with destroying secret-police records from the communist era. After a decade of delays, court fumbling and a well-timed certificate from a doctor, all five are home free. A 10-year statute of limitations on the charges ran out, and the case has been dropped.
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