Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHans Bethe
IN THE NEWS

Hans Bethe

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
August 6, 1995
At issue is not whether the bombs should have been used under any circumstance. The question that emerged from Granados' conversations with Hans Bethe was a pragmatic one: Taking all prevailing circumstance into consideration, should the atomic bombs have been dropped on Japan? When the bomb was dropped 50 years ago, I was a member of the U.S. Armed Forces in Okinawa, destined, no doubt, to participate in the invasion of Kyushu, scheduled for November, 1945. Nevertheless, to this day, I remain unconvinced that the Hiroshima bomb should have been dropped without warning.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | BEN DOBBIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a lifetime spent elucidating nature's inner workings, physicist Hans A. Bethe has come to rely on a few maxims: Begin the day with a hot bath. Trust a slide rule over a supercomputer. Tackle only those riddles over which "one has an unfair advantage." At his zenith, there seemed to be few well-defined conundrums of the cosmos that Bethe couldn't master, from figuring out how the sun and stars generate energy to his central role in designing the first atomic bomb.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | BEN DOBBIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a lifetime spent elucidating nature's inner workings, physicist Hans A. Bethe has come to rely on a few maxims: Begin the day with a hot bath. Trust a slide rule over a supercomputer. Tackle only those riddles over which "one has an unfair advantage." At his zenith, there seemed to be few well-defined conundrums of the cosmos that Bethe couldn't master, from figuring out how the sun and stars generate energy to his central role in designing the first atomic bomb.
MAGAZINE
August 6, 1995
At issue is not whether the bombs should have been used under any circumstance. The question that emerged from Granados' conversations with Hans Bethe was a pragmatic one: Taking all prevailing circumstance into consideration, should the atomic bombs have been dropped on Japan? When the bomb was dropped 50 years ago, I was a member of the U.S. Armed Forces in Okinawa, destined, no doubt, to participate in the invasion of Kyushu, scheduled for November, 1945. Nevertheless, to this day, I remain unconvinced that the Hiroshima bomb should have been dropped without warning.
NEWS
December 6, 2008
Salpeter obituary: The obituary of astrophysicist Edwin E. Salpeter in Monday's California section said that the "Salpeter-Bethe equation" showed how helium changes to carbon. In fact, that equation by Salpeter and Cornell colleague Hans Bethe describes bound states of a pair of interacting particles in quantum field theory.
NEWS
October 6, 1985
Nearly half of Cornell University's science, engineering and computer science professors have decided not to take part in research on the Reagan Administration's "Star Wars" program. Valerie Thomas, spokesman for the activist November 11th Committee, said that among the 128 of 258 faculty members who pledged not to do the research are Hans Bethe, a Nobel Prize winner, and Carl Sagan, the astronomer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1988
Thank you for Mueller's column, which raises questions about our past policy of deterrence. Two prominent physicists would seem to confirm Mueller's thesis that the fear of nuclear weapons does not fully explain the absence of a nuclear war over the past 40 years. Several years ago Hans Bethe and Kurt Gottfried pointed out that for two decades we were immune to a Soviet nuclear attack. But that vulnerability did not deter the Soviets from blockading Berlin, absorbing Czechoslovakia and crushing the revolt in Hungary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John L. Magee, 91, a chemist who participated in the Manhattan Project that developed the atom bomb during World War II, died Dec. 16 at an assisted-living facility in Moraga, Calif. Magee worked alongside J. Robert Oppenheimer, Richard Feynman, Edward Teller, Enrico Fermi and Hans Bethe on one of the most celebrated and controversial projects in the history of science. But after the Germans surrendered, Magee was among project members who opposed using the bomb against Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997
Your June 23 editorial, "Nuclear Specter Haunts Us Still," is absolutely right. Even though START II and START III treaties require substantial nuclear reductions, the U.S. and Russia will retain enough nuclear power to destroy each other many times over. And there is no guarantee that nuclear weapons will never be used. Joseph Rotblat, president of the Pugwash group of scientists and winner of the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize, put it very well: "If we were stupid enough--or mad enough--to accumulate [70,000 nuclear warheads]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2008 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Edwin E. Salpeter, 83, an astrophysicist whose work in the "Salpeter-Bethe equation" showed how helium changes to carbon, died of leukemia Tuesday at his home in Ithaca, N.Y., according to Cornell University, where he had been a professor emeritus of physical sciences. Salpeter attended Cornell in 1949 as a postdoctoral student and spent his career there. In 1951, he and Cornell theoretical physicist Hans Bethe, winner of the 1967 Nobel Prize in physics, introduced an equation showing how helium nuclei fuse to form carbon in the interiors of ancient stars.
NEWS
July 14, 1985 | United Press International
A computer scientist who has been a consultant to the military for more than a decade has resigned from a "Star Wars" advisory panel, convinced that its complex anti-missile defense will not work and research for it will be a waste of money. "My judgment is that research in 'Star Wars' is going to fail and I believe this so strongly that I'm willing to stake my professional reputation on this," said David Parnas, a professor at the University of Victoria in Victoria, British Columbia.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|