Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHans Burkhardt
IN THE NEWS

Hans Burkhardt

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hans Burkhardt, the much-honored Swiss-born artist whose protest paintings grew from the Dickensian squalor of his youth, died Friday. Burkhardt, whose subjects ranged from the divisiveness of the Spanish Civil War, the millions of dead in World War II and the horror of My Lai in Vietnam to the recent campaigns of Desert Storm, died at his home in Los Angeles, said Jack Rutberg, his agent and biographer. He was 89.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Before iPads, smart phones and even computers, there was the page: a tangible place to jot down thoughts, work out ideas, write a novel, love letter, thesis or equation. "Pages," an exhibition at the Williamson Gallery at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, focuses on the simple piece of refined pulp as a place for formal and finished ideas and a space for creativity. "It's a way of celebrating the page as our human external memory of choice for the last two millennial," said co-curator and gallery director Stephen Nowlin.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1991 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for Westside/Valley Calendar.
Hans Burkhardt remembers World War I. The 87-year-old painter was a child living in Switzerland when he saw airplanes flying over Basel that would drop the first bombs of war. "The city shook like an earthquake," Burkhardt said. This childhood experience made an indelible mark on the man, who emigrated to New York in 1924 and became a student and then patron and colleague of painter Arshile Gorky.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2002
About a quarter-century ago, I was a student of Max Hendler at Cal State Northridge ("So Simple, Yet So Difficult to Arrive At," by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, May 19). It was a good time. Hans Burkhardt was also teaching there. I remember Hendler's super-realistic still-life that he would spend a couple of years painting. He was an inspirational teacher and continues to be a great artist. His encouragement has brought me great satisfaction, success and happiness as an artist. ERWIN GLAUB Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like fellow Los Angeles resident and bleakly visionary artist Ed Kienholtz, Hans Burkhardt--the Swiss-born Abstract Expressionist painter who died in 1994 at the age of 89--received little recognition in Southern California for the bulk of his career. And little wonder, perhaps: Despite the airy seductions of climate and landscape, Burkhardt persistently invoked the heavy-duty themes of death, destruction and redemption.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Los Angeles painter Hans Burkhardt is a classic American-immigrant success story. Born in Basel, Switzerland, orphaned at 6, he had a childhood that makes "Oliver Twist" sound like a picnic. Always hungry in a nasty city orphanage, he worked at menial jobs from dawn to dusk earning miserly wages he never received. Wednesday he will be honored in New York with the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters' Jimmy Ernst Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2002
About a quarter-century ago, I was a student of Max Hendler at Cal State Northridge ("So Simple, Yet So Difficult to Arrive At," by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, May 19). It was a good time. Hans Burkhardt was also teaching there. I remember Hendler's super-realistic still-life that he would spend a couple of years painting. He was an inspirational teacher and continues to be a great artist. His encouragement has brought me great satisfaction, success and happiness as an artist. ERWIN GLAUB Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
Like Rico Lebrun, with whom he shares aesthetic and biographical parallels, Hans Burkhardt is an idiosyncratic figure in Southern California art history. Both were European-born artists who moved to the West Coast from New York in the late 1930s. Both evolved a Baroque, hot-blooded style from Cubist and Surrealist models, and both came to represent provincial anachronisms outside the developing mainstream of Abstract Expressionism.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Before iPads, smart phones and even computers, there was the page: a tangible place to jot down thoughts, work out ideas, write a novel, love letter, thesis or equation. "Pages," an exhibition at the Williamson Gallery at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, focuses on the simple piece of refined pulp as a place for formal and finished ideas and a space for creativity. "It's a way of celebrating the page as our human external memory of choice for the last two millennial," said co-curator and gallery director Stephen Nowlin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1998 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Casting a Shadow," a survey of paintings, drawings and prints by Hans Burkhardt, could just as easily have been titled "Filling a Void." The show, at Jack Rutberg Fine Arts, is one of dozens in galleries around town timed to complement the exhibition "Sunshine & Noir: Art in L.A. 1960-1997," now at the UCLA/Armand Hammer Museum. Burkhardt (1904-1994) is not represented in that show, just as he has largely been omitted from canonical writings on Abstract Expressionism.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1998 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Casting a Shadow," a survey of paintings, drawings and prints by Hans Burkhardt, could just as easily have been titled "Filling a Void." The show, at Jack Rutberg Fine Arts, is one of dozens in galleries around town timed to complement the exhibition "Sunshine & Noir: Art in L.A. 1960-1997," now at the UCLA/Armand Hammer Museum. Burkhardt (1904-1994) is not represented in that show, just as he has largely been omitted from canonical writings on Abstract Expressionism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like fellow Los Angeles resident and bleakly visionary artist Ed Kienholtz, Hans Burkhardt--the Swiss-born Abstract Expressionist painter who died in 1994 at the age of 89--received little recognition in Southern California for the bulk of his career. And little wonder, perhaps: Despite the airy seductions of climate and landscape, Burkhardt persistently invoked the heavy-duty themes of death, destruction and redemption.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hans Burkhardt, the much-honored Swiss-born artist whose protest paintings grew from the Dickensian squalor of his youth, died Friday. Burkhardt, whose subjects ranged from the divisiveness of the Spanish Civil War, the millions of dead in World War II and the horror of My Lai in Vietnam to the recent campaigns of Desert Storm, died at his home in Los Angeles, said Jack Rutberg, his agent and biographer. He was 89.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Los Angeles painter Hans Burkhardt is a classic American-immigrant success story. Born in Basel, Switzerland, orphaned at 6, he had a childhood that makes "Oliver Twist" sound like a picnic. Always hungry in a nasty city orphanage, he worked at menial jobs from dawn to dusk earning miserly wages he never received. Wednesday he will be honored in New York with the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters' Jimmy Ernst Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1991 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for Westside/Valley Calendar.
Hans Burkhardt remembers World War I. The 87-year-old painter was a child living in Switzerland when he saw airplanes flying over Basel that would drop the first bombs of war. "The city shook like an earthquake," Burkhardt said. This childhood experience made an indelible mark on the man, who emigrated to New York in 1924 and became a student and then patron and colleague of painter Arshile Gorky.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
Like Rico Lebrun, with whom he shares aesthetic and biographical parallels, Hans Burkhardt is an idiosyncratic figure in Southern California art history. Both were European-born artists who moved to the West Coast from New York in the late 1930s. Both evolved a Baroque, hot-blooded style from Cubist and Surrealist models, and both came to represent provincial anachronisms outside the developing mainstream of Abstract Expressionism.
NEWS
July 4, 2002
* Group Show: Modern and Contemporary (Jack Rutberg Fine Arts, 357 N. La Brea Ave., L.A., [323] 938-5222). Paintings, drawings, prints and sculpture by Milton Avery, Hans Burkhardt, Marc Chagall, Willem de Kooning, Max Ernst, Pablo Picasso, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec and others. Above is Toulouse-Lautrec's "May Milton" (1895). Ends Aug. 31.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Curbs Sought on Redwood Logging: Mendocino County supervisors approved tough curbs on annual tree harvests. State approval is pending on the action by the county, home to half of California's redwood trees. Under the rules, timber companies owning at least 5,000 acres would be prohibited from cutting more than 2% of the trees on their land each year. Logging in areas supporting Coho salmon spawning streams also would be restricted. Rapidly shrinking timber on Mendocino County's 1.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|