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Hans Dietrich Genscher

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July 22, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev criticized the West German government on arms issues during a "rather frank" exchange of views Monday with Bonn's foreign minister, Hans-Dietrich Genscher, a Soviet spokesman said. Genscher, who arrived Sunday, spent three hours in the Kremlin with Gorbachev discussing the entire range of bilateral and international issues, Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady Gerasimov said. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze sat in on the meeting.
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NEWS
November 1, 1994 | Tyler Marshall and Marjorie Miller
A s West German foreign minister over a period of 18 years between 1974-1992, Hans-Dietrich Genscher was an important figure in the events surrounding the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the rush to reunification. He remains a powerful force in German domestic politics and was recently reelected to the Bundestag. Amiable, open, and relaxed, he shook hands warmly with Times correspondents Tyler Marshall and Marjorie Miller.
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NEWS
August 1, 1988 | From Reuters
West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher said Sunday that Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev has assured him the Kremlin is not aiming to split the Western alliance between Europe and North America. Genscher told a news conference after a day of talks with Gorbachev and Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze that he is now even more convinced that the Soviet Union is working seriously for a fundamental improvement in East-West relations.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sudden turnabout that left the loser in tears, Germany's former spy chief was tapped as foreign minister Tuesday after party squabbling snatched the job away from the first woman ever appointed to the post. Justice Minister Klaus Kinkel was nominated to succeed Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher during a fractious caucus meeting of the liberal Free Democrats, the junior coalition party that holds that Cabinet post.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany's foreign minister Wednesday endorsed a Bush Administration proposal to assure continued U.S. influence in a post-Cold War Europe, even though America's military power may be overshadowed by the economic might of the 12-nation European Community. After meetings with President Bush and Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze declared here Wednesday that a conventional arms treaty in Vienna is a "first priority" for his country. After a hastily arranged meeting with West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher at the Soviet mission here, Shevardnadze sought to dispel the developing Western consensus that Moscow has slowed the pace of the arms talks in Vienna.
NEWS
January 22, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, stepping up his ratification campaign for the U.S.-Soviet treaty that would eliminate ground-launched medium-range nuclear missiles, prepared Thursday for Senate hearings next week by conferring with two diverse but key allies on arms control issues: West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher and former Republican Sen. John G. Tower of Texas. Reagan enlisted Tower, a former U.S.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher, at the White House for a preview of the Malta summit, gave President Bush a brick from the Berlin Wall on Tuesday as a symbol of the growing strength of democracy in Eastern Europe. After meeting with the President and Secretary of State James A. Baker III, Genscher said he had been assured that the United States will continue to support the wave of reform sweeping across Poland, Hungary and East Germany.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union on Tuesday rejected West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl's plan for German reunification, sharply criticizing it as an attempt to dictate to East Germany and warning that efforts to press the issue could destabilize all of Europe. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, backed by President Mikhail S.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl professed deep surprise Monday at the whirlwind of criticism generated here and abroad over his refusal to firmly recognize the present borders between East Germany and Poland. He told a news conference in the federal capital, "I don't understand the amazement over this," referring to widespread negative reaction to his blunt objection to guaranteeing Polish postwar frontiers.
NEWS
April 28, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hans-Dietrich Genscher, Germany's indefatigable foreign minister whose policies helped reunite his long-divided nation and shape the flow of European affairs for nearly two decades, announced his resignation suddenly Monday, declaring that he wants to devote time to the country's growing domestic problems. Genscher, 65, said he will step down on May 17, 18 years to the day after he took over the job. He is the world's longest-serving foreign minister.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moscow and Bonn inched closer to agreement Monday on the status of a united Germany, but Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze stressed that "some thorny problems remain." Shevardnadze and his West German counterpart, Hans-Dietrich Genscher, were upbeat after a four-hour meeting, shaking hands with cheering admirers in the cobblestoned marketplace of this medieval city.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze declared here Wednesday that a conventional arms treaty in Vienna is a "first priority" for his country. After a hastily arranged meeting with West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher at the Soviet mission here, Shevardnadze sought to dispel the developing Western consensus that Moscow has slowed the pace of the arms talks in Vienna.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany's foreign minister Wednesday endorsed a Bush Administration proposal to assure continued U.S. influence in a post-Cold War Europe, even though America's military power may be overshadowed by the economic might of the 12-nation European Community. After meetings with President Bush and Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl professed deep surprise Monday at the whirlwind of criticism generated here and abroad over his refusal to firmly recognize the present borders between East Germany and Poland. He told a news conference in the federal capital, "I don't understand the amazement over this," referring to widespread negative reaction to his blunt objection to guaranteeing Polish postwar frontiers.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The headlong rush toward German reunification has cleared two important hurdles, but serious, potentially volatile difficulties still loom ahead. Tuesday's accord in Ottawa on a formula for talks on German unity is a significant step even if it was anticipated.
NEWS
April 28, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hans-Dietrich Genscher, Germany's indefatigable foreign minister whose policies helped reunite his long-divided nation and shape the flow of European affairs for nearly two decades, announced his resignation suddenly Monday, declaring that he wants to devote time to the country's growing domestic problems. Genscher, 65, said he will step down on May 17, 18 years to the day after he took over the job. He is the world's longest-serving foreign minister.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Big Four victors of World War II and the two halves of defeated Germany agreed here Tuesday to begin historic talks "shortly" to reunify Germany and to discuss the security concerns of neighboring states. After a frenetic day of bilateral talks among their foreign ministers, the six nations issued a brief statement that, however vague, begins a process that will finally lead to a peace settlement with Germany 45 years after the end of the war.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Big Four victors of World War II and the two halves of defeated Germany agreed here Tuesday to begin historic talks "shortly" to reunify Germany and to discuss the security concerns of neighboring states. After a frenetic day of bilateral talks among their foreign ministers, the six nations issued a brief statement that, however vague, begins a process that will finally lead to a peace settlement with Germany 45 years after the end of the war.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After consultations with his French and British counterparts, Secretary of State James A. Baker III carries to Moscow today the outlines of a common allied position on German reunification, which has emerged as the most pressing single problem following the upheavals in Eastern Europe, senior U.S. officials indicated Tuesday.
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