Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHans Frederick Johnston
IN THE NEWS

Hans Frederick Johnston

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 13, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JANET STOBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After prosecutors discovered what they believe is a written confession, a British magistrate ordered an Orange County businessman accused of plotting to kill five people to stand trial in London later this year. Hans Frederick Johnston, who once controlled electronics manufacturer Statek Corp. in Orange, was arrested in April by London police, who charged the 71-year-old with conspiring to kill three American attorneys and two Swiss citizens, including his former partner at Statek.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
The former chairman of an Orange-based electronics company was sentenced to six years in prison Thursday after being convicted in London of hiring hit men to kill former business associates. The evidence against Hans Frederick Johnston, 72, of Stamford, Conn., included a letter he had written, admitting he had decided to "eliminate" his former associates.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
September 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
The former chairman of an Orange-based electronics company was sentenced to six years in prison Thursday after being convicted in London of hiring hit men to kill former business associates. The evidence against Hans Frederick Johnston, 72, of Stamford, Conn., included a letter he had written, admitting he had decided to "eliminate" his former associates.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JANET STOBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After prosecutors discovered what they believe is a written confession, a British magistrate ordered an Orange County businessman accused of plotting to kill five people to stand trial in London later this year. Hans Frederick Johnston, who once controlled electronics manufacturer Statek Corp. in Orange, was arrested in April by London police, who charged the 71-year-old with conspiring to kill three American attorneys and two Swiss citizens, including his former partner at Statek.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the surface, American businessman Hans Frederick Johnston and Swiss engineer Miklos Vendel seemed like the perfect corporate match. Johnston's peers describe him as "ambitious and autocratic," a savvy deal-maker with an eye for ripe companies. Vendel fit the traditional scientific persona, studious and cautious, opting for a hands-off approach to his investments. Together, they decided to buy Statek Corp., a struggling high-tech firm in Orange.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, P.J. Huffstutter covers high technology for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7830 and at p.j.huffstutter@latimes.com
Hans Frederick Johnston, who once controlled electronics manufacturer Statek Corp. in Orange and stands accused of allegedly plotting to kill five people, is expected to go to trial today in a London court. Last week, Johnston pleaded not guilty to the murder conspiracy charges, and guilty to two counts of using fake identification. Johnston was arrested in April 1998 by London police.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JANET STOBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After prosecutors discovered what they believe is a written confession, a British magistrate has ordered an Orange County businessman, accused of allegedly plotting to kill five people, to stand trial in London. Hans Frederick Johnston, who once controlled electronics manufacturer Statek Corp. in Orange, was arrested in April by London police. He was charged with conspiring to kill three American attorneys and two Swiss citizens, including his former partner at Statek.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
The former chairman of an Orange-based electronics company was sentenced to six years in prison Thursday after being convicted in London of hiring hit men to kill former business associates. The evidence against Hans Frederick Johnston, 72, of Stamford, Conn., included a letter he had written in which he admitted he had decided to "eliminate" his former associates.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the surface, American businessman Hans Frederick Johnston and Swiss engineer Miklos Vendel seemed like the perfect corporate match. Johnston's peers describe him as "ambitious and autocratic," a savvy deal-maker with an eye for ripe companies. Vendel fit the traditional scientific persona, studious and cautious, opting for a hands-off approach to his investments. Together, they decided to buy Statek Corp., a struggling high-tech firm in Orange.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|