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Hans Ulrich Klose

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NEWS
November 16, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After losing three straight general elections over the last decade, Germany's opposition Social Democrats have turned to new, largely untested faces to lead them to power by the mid-1990s. The surprise election this week of 54-year-old Hans-Ulrich Klose, the party treasurer and former Hamburg mayor, to the pivotal job of party parliamentary leader completed a cleaning out of the old guard and an attempt to bring new blood into the party hierarchy.
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NEWS
November 16, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After losing three straight general elections over the last decade, Germany's opposition Social Democrats have turned to new, largely untested faces to lead them to power by the mid-1990s. The surprise election this week of 54-year-old Hans-Ulrich Klose, the party treasurer and former Hamburg mayor, to the pivotal job of party parliamentary leader completed a cleaning out of the old guard and an attempt to bring new blood into the party hierarchy.
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NEWS
May 8, 1992 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public workers called off their nationwide strike Thursday after the embattled government caved in to union demands following 11 days of uncollected garbage, unsorted mail, idled trains and grounded airplanes. The union leadership accepted the 5.4% raise offer pending ratification by the 2-million-member rank and file. Voting is scheduled to begin today and last through the weekend. At first glance, the $10-billion pay package appeared to total more than a mediator's 5.
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sight of Chancellor Helmut Kohl in political hot water is nothing new. For much of his near decade-long tenure in office, pundits in Bonn have jumped to write the political obituary of a leader whom they love to portray as a coarse bumbler whose only real gift as a politician is a unique ability to sit out the many crises he's stumbled into.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | TAMARA JONES and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The German Parliament accused Serbia on Wednesday of "attempted genocide" and endorsed the deployment of a German destroyer in the Adriatic Sea despite opposition party vows to challenge Bonn's military powers in the nation's constitutional court. The legislators were summoned back from summer recess for the special session to debate the government's decision last week to dispatch the destroyer Bavaria and three surveillance planes to help monitor a U.N.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German lawmakers approved a controversial new asylum law Wednesday to halt the costly annual influx of nearly half a million foreigners, effectively slamming shut the industrialized world's last open door for economic refugees. About 10,000 angry protesters blockaded the seat of government in Bonn, throwing rocks, bottles and paint-filled balloons at legislators trying to reach the Bundestag building on the banks of the Rhine.
WORLD
February 13, 2003 | William Wallace, Special to The Times
Despite cries that he is making a mistake of historic proportions, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder pecked away at Washington's Iraq policy on Wednesday, swiftly dismissing American suggestions that there is an alliance of interests between Saddam Hussein and the Al Qaeda terror network.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2004 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
If the rest of the world could have voted in the U.S. presidential election, it seems likely that the global map would have been dominated by Democratic blue, interspersed with islands of Republican red and expanses of ambivalent gray. In Europe, the Arab world and Latin America, the prevailing emotions on the street were disappointment and dismay in the wake of President Bush's victory declaration Wednesday.
WORLD
December 16, 2004 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
Can a Turk be a European? Europe will ask that centuries-old riddle again today, when Turkey is expected to take a big step in its troubled quest to join the European Union. If all goes according to plan, EU leaders will set a date for Turkey to begin membership talks, a prospect certain to intensify doubts that a Muslim nation can be embraced by a Europe anxious about the rise of Islam across the continent. The historic negotiations could last 15 years. There is no guarantee of membership.
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