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Hansel And Gretel

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before the beignets and gumbo. The Skinny: About half the TV industry is in Miami for a programming convention, and the other half is in New Orleans for some football game. Either way, they are warm and dry. Monday's headlines include analysis of the Screen Actors Guild Awards and a recap of the weekend box office. Daily Dose: The Dodgers and Time Warner Cable are finally announcing their new TV partnership today, but this won't be a one-day story.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before the beignets and gumbo. The Skinny: About half the TV industry is in Miami for a programming convention, and the other half is in New Orleans for some football game. Either way, they are warm and dry. Monday's headlines include analysis of the Screen Actors Guild Awards and a recap of the weekend box office. Daily Dose: The Dodgers and Time Warner Cable are finally announcing their new TV partnership today, but this won't be a one-day story.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1997 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Overproduced and overdirected, the Juilliard Opera Center's new production of Engelbert Humperdinck's "Hansel and Gretel" nevertheless makes a handsome, if cluttered, Christmas season bouquet for the series Live From Lincoln Center. Taped at the last of four New York City performances on Wednesday, it will be shown locally on Sunday at 2 p.m. on KCET-TV Channel 28.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before figuring out if my life is Ground Hog day. The Skinny: It's supposed to rain all weekend. I'll enjoy it at night and hate it during the day. Friday's headlines include a preview of the weekend box office, a new director for "Star Wars" and a big hire at CNN. Daily Dose: Time Warner Cable and the Dodgers were hoping to have their big TV deal wrapped up by now and it could still be done by Friday....
MAGAZINE
October 27, 1985 | SARAH LIFTON, Sarah Lifton is a Culver City-based writer specializing in the arts.
My hometown was a serious city, sadly bereft of architectural folly. For most of the year its traditional facades and graceful streets were a source of civic pride, but the end of October always rendered its aesthetic conventions curiously deficient. At the time, my childhood Halloweens seemed entirely adequate; I completed a satisfactory tenure as trick-or-treater, masquerading alternately as Gypsy, princess, pirate, witch and vampire.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2000 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
"Hansel and Gretel" has long been regarded as family fare. But seldom has there come along a version of the classic tale that's as much a family affair as the one opening at the Falcon Theatre on Saturday. Updated, re-imagined and modernized to maximize the laughs, the new adaptation is the work of Lori Marshall, a playwright-author who happens to be the eldest of Falcon Theatre founder Garry Marshall's three children.
SPORTS
May 20, 1989
Would it help the Dodgers' infrequent baserunners to score if Tom Lasorda spread bread crumbs from second base to home plate? SEAMAN JACOBS Beverly Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1989 | KENNETH HERMAN
San Diego Opera has commissioned composer Jeffrey Rockwell to write a children's opera to be produced in city and county schools. "Rip Van Winkle" will augment the company's "Hansel and Gretel" educational program, where a professional team from San Diego Opera spends six weeks in residence at an elementary school to produce an opera by and for the students. Ian Campbell, the opera's general director, announced the commission Monday. The "Rip Van Winkle" project's first production will be in October at San Diego's O'Farrell School for the Creative and Performing Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
The show must go on. Five minutes into a Saturday matinee performance of the Venture Theatre's children's musical, it was clear something was amiss. There were puzzling silences and the dialogue had an ad-libbed quality. Director Gye di Capua stopped the show; the taped music wasn't working. The cast retired backstage for a fresh start. The audience was sympathetic; these things happen. They applauded. They waited. And waited. The music started. It stopped. Muffled exclamations were heard.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2006 | Diane Haithman
THESE days, it seems that puppets and marionettes are onstage everywhere -- and not just on "Avenue Q." At New York's Metropolitan Opera, soprano Cristina Gallardo-Domas has been singing the part of Cio-Cio-San in "Madama Butterfly" amid a cast of cloaked puppeteers, with another puppet in the "role" of her son. On this coast, the Salzburg Marionettes recently frolicked at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa in "The Magic Flute" and "Hansel and Gretel."
BUSINESS
December 20, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
The brothers Grimm, recipients of today's Google Doodle, published a book of fairy tales 200 years ago that would come to define bedtime reading for millions of children over two centuries. Thursday's doodle tells the story of Little Red Riding Hood. Twenty-one different slides depict her journey from town, to woods, to Grandma's house, to wolf's belly, to freedom in the arms of a burly woodsman. The story is universally known -- one we grew up on, and our parents grew up on, and their parents before them.  But Google could have chosen half a dozen other stories published by the German brothers that are similarly embedded in our culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
In a surprise move coming less than two years after Roger Birnbaum was appointed co-chairman and co-CEO of MGM, the executive is seguing into an exclusive producing deal with the studio, the company announced Wednesday morning.  Birnbaum's longtime producing partner and current MGM co-chairman Gary Barber will become the sole chairman and CEO. Birnbaum, who has a long history as a producer in Hollywood, will remain at his MGM offices producing...
IMAGE
December 11, 2011 | By Melissa Magsaysay and Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
Once upon a time - and by that we mean just a few months ago - it was the old-school horror genre that was being dusted off and repurposed into 21st century popular culture replete with wizards, werewolves, zombies and the hollow-cheeked vampires of the vanities. Today it's not horror stories but fairy tales seizing the collective imagination. For evidence, one need look no further than the fall TV schedule, where NBC rolled out "Grimm" (recasting fairy tales as crime procedurals)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil" is all-sugar rush, its potential to charm adults and their young charges routinely drowned out by a bigger/faster/jokier ethos. Directed by Mike Disa and scripted by the same team behind 2005's cheeky "Hoodwinked," the film sees Red (Hayden Panettiere, taking over for Anne Hathaway) now training ninja-style with an elite female goodies-making squad called the Sisters of the Hood. Fighting techniques include a flipping maneuver called the Spatula. The Happily Ever After agency, meanwhile, run by British-accented frog crime solver Nicky Flippers (David Ogden Stiers)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
All grown up, Hansel and Gretel return to the forest to exact revenge on their childhood tormentors. Snow White escapes the Evil Queen and takes up with a group of Shaolin monks. And after leaving Kansas, carnival barker Oscar Diggs remakes himself as a wizard in the Emerald City. Childhood classics as seen through a fun-house mirror? Well, yes. But for the film business, it's also something far more consequential: its future. Movie studios are taking timeless stories from authors such as the Brothers Grimm and L. Frank Baum and reimagining them with a modern, playful sensibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2009 | Carmela Ciuraru
Beyond their kitschy, noisy facades, American Chinatowns are more than a place to find a counterfeit Kate Spade bag, cheap dim sum and tacky souvenirs. For hundreds of thousands of people, Chinatown is home. In "American Chinatown: A People's History of Five Neighborhoods," author Bonnie Tsui immerses herself in some of these communities, exploring their class struggles, rivalries, customs and dialects. "What was most surprising to learn was how little things have changed," she said by phone, "because it's still where new working-class immigrants go because they don't have anywhere else to go. That's a small comfort when you're making your way in a completely unfamiliar place."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1986
As members of a support group for Step-Mothers, we take offense at your implication that the unpleasant things from nature are due to "stepmother nature" (Traveling in Style, Oct. 19, "Rainy Day Roving" by Marion Gough). Over the centuries stepmothers have been branded as wicked, cruel and insensitive (i.e., Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel, and Snow White, to name a few examples). Perhaps you are unaware of it, but today probably one-half of your female readers are stepmothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
In a surprise move coming less than two years after Roger Birnbaum was appointed co-chairman and co-CEO of MGM, the executive is seguing into an exclusive producing deal with the studio, the company announced Wednesday morning.  Birnbaum's longtime producing partner and current MGM co-chairman Gary Barber will become the sole chairman and CEO. Birnbaum, who has a long history as a producer in Hollywood, will remain at his MGM offices producing...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Opera's new production of Engelbert Humperdinck's "Hansel and Gretel," which opened an eight-performance run Sunday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, is a decidedly family-friendly version that is more likely to engage children than adults.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2006 | Jan Breslauer, Special to The Times
DIRECTOR-DESIGNER Douglas Fitch may be in his 40s, but he's on very close terms with his inner 10-year-old. At a costume fitting for his production of "Hansel and Gretel," opening next Sunday at Los Angeles Opera, Fitch is ebullient. First, there is a tall totem pole-like creature, resembling a bear with an owl sitting on top and an extra set of arms. Next, there is the forest gnome, a squiggly-wiggly-legged fellow with a rounded body.
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