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Hantaviruses

SCIENCE
June 10, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
As many as 19 people may have been infected this year with hantavirus, a rare disease spread by mice, and officials are worried more cases may follow. Nine confirmed infections, four fatal, occurred in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, South Dakota and Washington by the end of March, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. Ten suspected cases have been reported since April. Last year, there were 34 cases, 10 ending in death.
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NEWS
October 24, 1993 | TIM KORTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The leaves are changing colors. There's a brittle chill in the morning air. Footballs are everywhere. But the arrival of autumn this year heralds concern. Deer mice are seeking hiding places indoors, perhaps bringing with them a virus blamed for as many as 25 deaths in nine states. New Mexico has registered the most fatalities, with 10. "Cold weather will limit their sources of food and warmth," said Bill Williams, spokesman for the state health department.
NEWS
August 6, 1994 | Associated Press
Clark County's first hantavirus victim, a Las Vegas construction worker who recovered from the deadly disease, has been confirmed by the state Health Division. Dr. Randy Todd, state epidemiologist, also said Friday that Washoe County health officials are investigating a possible hantavirus case involving a Vya-area woman, who also survived. Todd said tests confirmed that the Las Vegas man was infected with the Muerto Canyon virus, which caused the hantavirus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1999
A population explosion of deer mice on the Channel Islands, and an epidemic among them of the potentially deadly hantavirus, has prompted top state health officials to urge the National Park Service to do something. Recent studies show that as many as seven in 10 rodents on Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa islands are infected with hantavirus--more than any other region in the nation--which can cause a rare, but often fatal, disease in people.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | Associated Press
A Hemet woman who died in June after cleaning a mountain cabin was the victim of a heart condition and was not afflicted by hantavirus as initially suspected, Riverside County officials said Wednesday. Donna Lynch suffered from inflammation of the heart muscle caused by an unknown infection, said Sheriff's Sgt. Mark Lohman. Authorities are no longer investigating the case and do not consider hantavirus to be a threat in the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven deer mice found in Loma Linda, Yucaipa and Mentone were confirmed to carry the potentially fatal hantavirus, state officials said Thursday. The last reported case of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, the disease in its human form, occurred in the area about two years ago in a Highland resident, who survived the infection. The disease was recognized only 12 years ago, but there have been 43 human cases -- with 25% fatalities -- in California and more than 380 cases nationwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1993 | GEOFF BOUCHER
While Orange County officials anxiously wait to find out whether the deadly hantavirus is lurking in local rodents, county park workers are striving to keep themselves safe and visitors calm. None of the county's 18 regional parks, nor the sprawling Cleveland National Forest, have posted warning signs or literature about the virus, but some employees say visitors are concerned about the airborne virus.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | Associated Press
The hantavirus that has killed at least 40 people, including many Navajos, should not be named after a canyon on their reservation, the Navajo Nation Council says. The council voted 52 to 0 last week to ask the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention not to recommend naming the virus Muerto Canyon Hantavirus. The CDC proposed the name recently, saying it was following a custom of naming diseases after the spot where they were discovered.
SCIENCE
August 30, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
 In what is almost certainly a medical first, a physician from my hometown of St. Joseph, Mo., has identified a new viral disease thought to be transmitted by ticks. The virus  is related to hantaviruses, which have recently caused at least two deaths at Yosemite National Park, but so far only two confirmed cases have been observed. Because the two farmers who contracted the virus live 60 miles apart, however, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suspect there are probably many more unrecognized cases.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Yosemite National Park is gearing up for summer. Glacier Park Road opens noon Friday (today) and the east-west Tioga Road that accesses the back country is expected to open May 11. The housekeeping tents in Curry Village are up, and horse rides and open-air Yosemite Valley tours are ready too. But there's something you'll see more of this year too: hantavirus warnings. A rare and deadly hantavirus outbreak last summer killed three people and sickened seven others . "We're telling folks the same things we've been telling them, but in a lot more places," Tom Medema, the park's chief interpretation and education ranger, said Thursday.
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