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Hanukkah

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1986
The candles that burn during the Jewish festival of Hanukkah--starting this year on the night of Dec. 26--commemorate two miracles: first, the victory of the small band of Jews led by Judah Maccabee who recaptured Jewish independence from the mighty Greco-Syrian empire; second, the burning for eight days of the tiny cruse of oil used to relight the Temple menorah after the victory. At this festive season, it is appropriate to remember another small band of Jews who are courageously resisting the oppression of a mighty empire.
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OPINION
November 27, 2013 | By Arthur J. Magida
The New York I lived in as a kid was a village of four or five blocks. I could wander anywhere my curiosity took me, safe and secure and knowing I'd still find my way home. I could go around the corner to the barber shop and get a trim for a quarter. I could walk a block farther to Moisha's butcher shop, where I'd purchase that night's meal with money my mother had given me, then carry it home, proud and possessive. And when I was 5 years old, I went to the neighborhood movie theater, the Surrey, for the first time by myself.
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NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Karin Klein
They're almost as much a part of Hanukkah as potato pancakes, the foil-wrapped chocolate candies called gelt that usually come in plastic-mesh bags at the checkout stand and taste pretty much like the leftover wax from the candles in the menorah. Embossed with designs, they're meant to represent the coins that once were given to children as an encouragement for their Jewish studies. (As with most Jewish traditions, there are multiple explanations for the tradition.) In other words, they don't taste very good, and at a time when Hostess cupcakes are headed toward possible extinction, perhaps it makes sense that another low-quality sweet from the nostalgia banks of baby boomers is undergoing an upscale -- and ethical -- makeover.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Sherry Stern
Hanukkah comes early this year, starting at sundown on Wednesday, meaning the eight-day holiday overlaps with Thanksgiving. (Thanksgiving-akah anyone? Hanukkagiving?) But it's Christmas that gets a mash-up treatment with the Jewish Festival of Lights in a new video called "Christmas Confusion" from the seriously talented and seriously funny classical team Igudesman & Joo. Violinst Joshua Bell is along for the ride, playing with Hyung-ki Joo, the duo's Korean-born pianist, and Alek­sey Igudes­man, the Russian-born violinist.
FOOD
December 8, 2012 | By Faye Levy
As a child in Hebrew school, I was taught the story of the Hanukkah miracle: When the Jews in the land of Israel defeated the foreigners, the priests seeking to rekindle the temple's eternal light found enough ritually pure oil for only one day. Miraculously that oil lasted for eight days. Since then, Jews have been celebrating Hanukkah every year by lighting candles every day for eight days. Children in Israel play with dreidels inscribed with the first Hebrew letters of the phrase "a big miracle happened here "; in Washington, D.C., my birthplace, our dreidels had the first letters of "a big miracle happened there . " Until I lived in Israel, I associated the holiday with latkes, or potato pancakes.
FOOD
December 15, 2011 | By Phyllis Glazer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For Jewish parents, the Hanukkah holidays are particularly challenging; they last not one day but eight. Beginning this year at sunset Tuesday and ending at sunset Dec. 28, there will be lots of candles to light, loads of latkes to fry and eight nights of activities to plan for the kids. Oy vey. Also called the Festival of Lights, Hanukkah celebrates liberation from oppression (especially for kids from school, provided that the holiday coincides with Christmas vacation), and the faith that if you really believe in something hard enough, even a small group of committed activists can make a difference.
NEWS
December 19, 1985
Re "December Dilemma of Holidays" (by Lynn Smith, Dec. 12): It is wholly inappropriate, indeed it is a perversion of Hanukkah to bring symbols of Christ's birth into Jewish homes. It mocks the struggle of the Maccabees. Whatever external features Christmas and Hanukkah may share, Hanukkah is distinctly Jewish, and Christmas is distinctly Christian. When this is recognized and respected, it is to the benefit of both faiths, while superficial assimilation is detrimental to each. I am offended by the photograph of Patti Lewis, in which the Hanukkah candelabrum is a prominent feature of her Catholic altar, its lights illuminating the face of a Catholic saint.
FOOD
December 22, 1999
I find it insulting and offensive that in her article, "Lights and Latkes: The story of Hanukkah and how the holiday grew" (Dec. 1), Susan Friedland writes that "the candle lighting was probably borrowed from pagan solstice celebrations." According to Jewish law, the reason Hanukkah is celebrated by the lighting of menorahs is because our sages directed us to do so to commemorate the miracles that happened. I challenge Friedland to find a single reliable source that points to pagan worship as the reason.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000
"Without a doubt," said Rabbi David Eliezrie with considerable pride, "this is the largest permanent menorah in California." Who would argue? The gleaming likeness of the Jewish seven-branch candelabrum stands 16 feet tall outside Congregation Beth Meir HaCohen-Chabad Center in Yorba Linda. And this year it's better. On Wednesday, Eliezrie, at right, was busy fitting propane burners where traditionally candles are placed. Last year the candles kept blowing out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000
Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the temple at Jerusalem after a stunning victory around 165 BC over a Syrian ruler who sought to destroy Judaism. A list of some public Hanukkah celebrations taking place in Orange County today: * 4 p.m. Laguna Hills Mall (in front of Macy's). Children's choir, latkes. * 4 p.m. Fashion Island, Newport Beach. Rep. Christopher Cox will light the first candle. * 6 p.m. Crown Valley Park, Laguna Niguel (Crown Valley Parkway near Niguel Road).
BUSINESS
December 25, 2012 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
The tipsy crowd leaned in to take a gander at contestant No. 1: Natalie Novoa was sporting a flashing Christmas sweater bedazzled with pompoms, sequins and a stuffed gingerbread man. With Christmas fast approaching, she twirled on a chair showing off her forest green pullover as it twinkled red, blue and green - lighting up the dark Silver Lake bar. She was vying with four other holiday-hued patrons this week for the coveted title of "ugliest holiday...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2012 | By Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
The dancing broke out spontaneously. One moment, a guitarist was performing before more than 200 elderly Jewish people, most of whom looked content to remain in their seats and let the latkes settle. The next, the onlookers were on their feet, clapping to traditional Yiddish songs and forming a human chain that whipped around the tables. An elderly woman in a sparkling black dress swung her hips in the corner of the room. Eyes closed, she was doing the polka, no partner required.
NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By Jenn Harris
Saturday marked the first night of the Jewish holiday Hanukkah, also known as the Festival of Lights. During Monday morning's #Weekendeats chat on Twitter, participants shared their recipes for Hanukkah fare. Here are the highlights: Samantha Ferraro from the blog the Little Ferraro Kitchen , one of the winners of our 2012 Holiday Cookie Bake-Off, shared her recipe for ruby red beet latkes with cumin, and the blog Mango and Tomato shared a recipe for tri-colored latkes made with potatoes, sweet potatoes and beets and served with horseradish cream.
NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Made with grated sweet potatoes, carrots and parsnips in addition to potatoes, these latkes from cookbook author Phyllis Glazer look like little glowing suns -- making them perfectly appropriate for the Festival of Lights. Winter sunshine latkes is one of the favorite holiday recipes we've collected in our "Los Angeles Times Holiday Handbook. " The book shares more than 110 seasonal recipes to help you celebrate Thanksgiving, Hanukkah , Christmas and New Year's. We've also updated last year's "Los Angeles Times Holiday Cookies," so it now includes 65 recipes from a wide range of sources, including world-famous pastry chefs and home cooks.
FOOD
December 8, 2012
Hanukkah kubanah with fig jam (pull-apart Middle Eastern bread) Total time: 5 hours, plus about 2 hours rising time Servings: 8 1 envelope active dry yeast (¼ ounce or 2¼ teaspoons) 1/3 cup lukewarm water (about 110 degrees) 2 tablespoons sugar, divided 1/3 cup fig jam or other jam or jelly 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/2 cup mild olive oil, divided 3/4 cup hot water (about 150 degrees) 3 cups flour (about 13.6 ounces)
FOOD
December 8, 2012 | By Faye Levy
As a child in Hebrew school, I was taught the story of the Hanukkah miracle: When the Jews in the land of Israel defeated the foreigners, the priests seeking to rekindle the temple's eternal light found enough ritually pure oil for only one day. Miraculously that oil lasted for eight days. Since then, Jews have been celebrating Hanukkah every year by lighting candles every day for eight days. Children in Israel play with dreidels inscribed with the first Hebrew letters of the phrase "a big miracle happened here "; in Washington, D.C., my birthplace, our dreidels had the first letters of "a big miracle happened there . " Until I lived in Israel, I associated the holiday with latkes, or potato pancakes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1998 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Watching the crowd of several hundred people gather Sunday to celebrate Hanukkah at Fashion Island, Eva Atimsky smiled in awe at the sight--something she never would have seen in her home country. Atimsky emigrated 10 years ago from Uzbekistan, a part of the former Soviet Union, where the practice of religion was simply banned. "I'm so excited," said the 52-year-old woman who now lives in La Habra. "We never celebrated it like this.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Potato latkes have the reputation of being a bit, well, beige . They're good to serve with other things. But these latkes from Israeli cookbook author Phyllis Glazer, made with red and green onions and cubes of feta cheese, are sufficient unto themselves. Potato latkes with cheese and onions is one of the favorite holiday recipes we've collected in our "Los Angeles Times Holiday Handbook. " The book shares more than 110 seasonal recipes to help you celebrate Thanksgiving, Hanukkah , Christmas and New Year's.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Similar to fried doughnut holes, bumuelos are little round balls of choux-like pastry fried in oil and prepared by Jews of Greece and Turkey. In this recipe, from food writer Phyllis Glazer, the bumuelos are topped with a dusting of powdered sugar and are served with a sweet, red wine syrup. This festive dessert is one of the favorite holiday recipes we've collected in our "Los Angeles Times Holiday Handbook. " The book shares more than 110 seasonal recipes to help you celebrate Thanksgiving, Hanukkah , Christmas and New Year's.
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