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Happiness

BUSINESS
October 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Move over, peace and happiness. Computers are what Americans really want nowadays. The machines outrank peace, happiness and clothes this year as the most wished-for gifts, according to a U.S. survey by the Consumer Electronics Assn., an industry's trade organization. Last year, the most popular answer to the annual survey's open-ended query about respondents' holiday wishes was clothing, followed by peace and happiness, money and computers.
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SCIENCE
November 24, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Fast food might make it harder to stop and smell the roses - and not just because of the overpowering aroma of French fries  - a new study from the University of Toronto argues. Researchers pointed out that Americans have gained more and more leisure time, yet they aren't any happier. The problem could be that modern conveniences that are supposed to save time actually make us more impatient, and therefore less able to savor small moments of joy. To test that theory, the University of Toronto researchers carried out three different tests focused on happiness and quintessentially American “symbols of the culture of impatience”: fast foods.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
With his shock of silver-gray hair, his face etched by time with the lean expressiveness of a Giacometti sculpture and his soulful eyes registering every fleeting hurt and happiness, John Hurt bears a striking resemblance to Samuel Beckett in the distinguished British actor's magnificent rendition of "Krapp's Last Tape" at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. For anyone needing a reminder that theater can be an art (and not just a scrappy entertainment), this beautifully mounted production of Beckett's play, directed by Michael Colgan of Dublin's Gate Theatre, is not to be missed.
HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Picture potato chips or chocolate - or any food you feel you can't resist. Chances are, your brain associates this food with a promise of happiness, says Kelly McGonigal, psychology instructor at Stanford University. But foods we have little control around act like the elusive carrot on a stick: The more we eat, the more we want. We never feel we have enough because the promise of reward is always in front of us - if only we eat one more, then another, and soon we're left with crumbs at the bottom of the bag. Yet the longing remains.
MAGAZINE
November 17, 1996
Wendy Kaminer's reflection on satisfaction ("The Inner You," Oct. 13) sees Thomas Jefferson "enshrining the pursuit of happiness as a national entitlement" in the same manner, one must suppose, as Social Security and Medicare have been so enshrined. Jefferson would be aghast. He saw the pursuit of happiness not as an entitlement but as an inviolable individual right. Kaminer further states that Jefferson's point of view was that the purpose of education is "self-government, not self-esteem."
HEALTH
March 17, 2012 | Jeannine Stein
We know filmmaker David Lynch for the dark surrealism of "Eraserhead," "Blue Velvet," "Inland Empire" and "Twin Peaks," as well as for his deep, abiding love of coffee. Lynch is also passionate about transcendental meditation, which he first took up "on a beautiful, sunny Saturday morning" in 1973. That passion spawned a book, "Catching the Big Fish," and the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and World Peace. Lynch spoke about what TM means for him and why others should try it too. Catch the longer podcast at latimes.com/davidlynch.
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