Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHappiness
IN THE NEWS

Happiness

BUSINESS
October 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Move over, peace and happiness. Computers are what Americans really want nowadays. The machines outrank peace, happiness and clothes this year as the most wished-for gifts, according to a U.S. survey by the Consumer Electronics Assn., an industry's trade organization. Last year, the most popular answer to the annual survey's open-ended query about respondents' holiday wishes was clothing, followed by peace and happiness, money and computers.
Advertisement
HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Picture potato chips or chocolate - or any food you feel you can't resist. Chances are, your brain associates this food with a promise of happiness, says Kelly McGonigal, psychology instructor at Stanford University. But foods we have little control around act like the elusive carrot on a stick: The more we eat, the more we want. We never feel we have enough because the promise of reward is always in front of us - if only we eat one more, then another, and soon we're left with crumbs at the bottom of the bag. Yet the longing remains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
As the leader of Tibetan Buddhism, the 14th Dalai Lama says he practices compassion to such an extent that he tries to avoid swatting mosquitoes "when my mood is good and there is no danger of malaria," sometimes watching with interest as they swell with his blood. Yet, in an appearance Tuesday at USC, he appeared to suggest that the United States was justified in killing Osama bin Laden. As a human being, Bin Laden may have deserved compassion and even forgiveness, the Dalai Lama said in answer to a question about the assassination of the Al Qaeda leader.
MAGAZINE
November 17, 1996
Wendy Kaminer's reflection on satisfaction ("The Inner You," Oct. 13) sees Thomas Jefferson "enshrining the pursuit of happiness as a national entitlement" in the same manner, one must suppose, as Social Security and Medicare have been so enshrined. Jefferson would be aghast. He saw the pursuit of happiness not as an entitlement but as an inviolable individual right. Kaminer further states that Jefferson's point of view was that the purpose of education is "self-government, not self-esteem."
OPINION
October 14, 2009 | Barbara Ehrenreich, Barbara Ehrenreich is the author, most recently, of "Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America." A version of this article also appears at tomdispatch.com.
Feminism made women miserable. This, anyway, seems to be the most popular take-away from "The Paradox of Declining Female Happiness," a recent study by Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers that purports to show that women have become steadily unhappier since 1972. Maureen Dowd and Ariana Huffington greeted the news with somber perplexity, but the more common response has been a triumphant "I told you so!" On Slate's Double X website, a columnist concluded from the study that "the feminist movement of the 1960s and 1970s gave us a steady stream of women's complaints disguised as manifestos ... and a brand of female sexual power so promiscuous that it celebrates everything from prostitution to nipple piercing as a feminist act -- in other words, whine, womyn, and thongs."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|