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Happiness

BUSINESS
October 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Move over, peace and happiness. Computers are what Americans really want nowadays. The machines outrank peace, happiness and clothes this year as the most wished-for gifts, according to a U.S. survey by the Consumer Electronics Assn., an industry's trade organization. Last year, the most popular answer to the annual survey's open-ended query about respondents' holiday wishes was clothing, followed by peace and happiness, money and computers.
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HEALTH
March 17, 2012 | Jeannine Stein
We know filmmaker David Lynch for the dark surrealism of "Eraserhead," "Blue Velvet," "Inland Empire" and "Twin Peaks," as well as for his deep, abiding love of coffee. Lynch is also passionate about transcendental meditation, which he first took up "on a beautiful, sunny Saturday morning" in 1973. That passion spawned a book, "Catching the Big Fish," and the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and World Peace. Lynch spoke about what TM means for him and why others should try it too. Catch the longer podcast at latimes.com/davidlynch.
OPINION
October 14, 2009 | Barbara Ehrenreich, Barbara Ehrenreich is the author, most recently, of "Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America." A version of this article also appears at tomdispatch.com.
Feminism made women miserable. This, anyway, seems to be the most popular take-away from "The Paradox of Declining Female Happiness," a recent study by Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers that purports to show that women have become steadily unhappier since 1972. Maureen Dowd and Ariana Huffington greeted the news with somber perplexity, but the more common response has been a triumphant "I told you so!" On Slate's Double X website, a columnist concluded from the study that "the feminist movement of the 1960s and 1970s gave us a steady stream of women's complaints disguised as manifestos ... and a brand of female sexual power so promiscuous that it celebrates everything from prostitution to nipple piercing as a feminist act -- in other words, whine, womyn, and thongs."
MAGAZINE
November 17, 1996
Wendy Kaminer's reflection on satisfaction ("The Inner You," Oct. 13) sees Thomas Jefferson "enshrining the pursuit of happiness as a national entitlement" in the same manner, one must suppose, as Social Security and Medicare have been so enshrined. Jefferson would be aghast. He saw the pursuit of happiness not as an entitlement but as an inviolable individual right. Kaminer further states that Jefferson's point of view was that the purpose of education is "self-government, not self-esteem."
HEALTH
September 8, 2008 | Marnell Jameson, Special to The Times
Happiness, and finding more of it, has been on the minds of Adam and Kelly Radinsky for about a year now. The couple, who are married and live in Topanga Canyon with their two children, had a strong hunch that being happier was within reach. They read up on the subject and took action. "I was the classic stressed-out lawyer, but that's changed, said Adam, 46, a deputy city attorney for Santa Monica, "I don't want to say this miracle happened overnight, but I'm noticeably happier today than I was six months ago."
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