Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHappiness
IN THE NEWS

Happiness

BUSINESS
October 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Move over, peace and happiness. Computers are what Americans really want nowadays. The machines outrank peace, happiness and clothes this year as the most wished-for gifts, according to a U.S. survey by the Consumer Electronics Assn., an industry's trade organization. Last year, the most popular answer to the annual survey's open-ended query about respondents' holiday wishes was clothing, followed by peace and happiness, money and computers.
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
November 17, 1996
Wendy Kaminer's reflection on satisfaction ("The Inner You," Oct. 13) sees Thomas Jefferson "enshrining the pursuit of happiness as a national entitlement" in the same manner, one must suppose, as Social Security and Medicare have been so enshrined. Jefferson would be aghast. He saw the pursuit of happiness not as an entitlement but as an inviolable individual right. Kaminer further states that Jefferson's point of view was that the purpose of education is "self-government, not self-esteem."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
With his shock of silver-gray hair, his face etched by time with the lean expressiveness of a Giacometti sculpture and his soulful eyes registering every fleeting hurt and happiness, John Hurt bears a striking resemblance to Samuel Beckett in the distinguished British actor's magnificent rendition of "Krapp's Last Tape" at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. For anyone needing a reminder that theater can be an art (and not just a scrappy entertainment), this beautifully mounted production of Beckett's play, directed by Michael Colgan of Dublin's Gate Theatre, is not to be missed.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
If you were to travel anywhere in the globe -- even to visit remote tribes who have scant contact with the larger world -- would people be able to read your emotions from your facial expressions (happiness, sadness, disgust, etc.) and would you be able to read theirs? In other words, do people smile when they're happy, wrinkle their noses when disgusted, the world over? Scientists have long thought so, but authors of a new study challenge the idea. Charles Darwin argued in “The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals” that basic facial expressions are universal -- implying that are hard-wired within us, the product of natural selection.
OPINION
July 9, 2006
Re "Happy? Let's Sum It Up," Column One, July 3 Happiness economics is apparently a legitimate field populated by behavioral scientists as well as those who would write for Forbes magazine. That people in Cuba come in second in happiness to those in our country attests to the fact that happiness unfolds from something other than palatial estates, Humvees, Rolls-Royces and designer everything. As a psychotherapist, I hear people wanting community more than anything in their lives.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|