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Happiness

ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
David Lynch fans have been waiting years for the director to announce he's making another movie. It's been six years since his last one, the challenging but appreciated “Inland Empire,” which makes the Surrealist auteur long overdue. But those hoping the streak will be broken soon are in for a disappointment: Lynch said he's lacking the inspiration that drives him to make movies. “I haven't gotten the big idea,” he told 24 Frames this week. “I've got some fragments that are coming, but not the big idea.” The director added, "If I got an idea that I fell in love with, I'd go to work tomorrow.
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NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
If you were to travel anywhere in the globe -- even to visit remote tribes who have scant contact with the larger world -- would people be able to read your emotions from your facial expressions (happiness, sadness, disgust, etc.) and would you be able to read theirs? In other words, do people smile when they're happy, wrinkle their noses when disgusted, the world over? Scientists have long thought so, but authors of a new study challenge the idea. Charles Darwin argued in “The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals” that basic facial expressions are universal -- implying that are hard-wired within us, the product of natural selection.
HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Picture potato chips or chocolate - or any food you feel you can't resist. Chances are, your brain associates this food with a promise of happiness, says Kelly McGonigal, psychology instructor at Stanford University. But foods we have little control around act like the elusive carrot on a stick: The more we eat, the more we want. We never feel we have enough because the promise of reward is always in front of us - if only we eat one more, then another, and soon we're left with crumbs at the bottom of the bag. Yet the longing remains.
SCIENCE
November 24, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Fast food might make it harder to stop and smell the roses - and not just because of the overpowering aroma of French fries  - a new study from the University of Toronto argues. Researchers pointed out that Americans have gained more and more leisure time, yet they aren't any happier. The problem could be that modern conveniences that are supposed to save time actually make us more impatient, and therefore less able to savor small moments of joy. To test that theory, the University of Toronto researchers carried out three different tests focused on happiness and quintessentially American “symbols of the culture of impatience”: fast foods.
MAGAZINE
November 17, 1996
Wendy Kaminer's reflection on satisfaction ("The Inner You," Oct. 13) sees Thomas Jefferson "enshrining the pursuit of happiness as a national entitlement" in the same manner, one must suppose, as Social Security and Medicare have been so enshrined. Jefferson would be aghast. He saw the pursuit of happiness not as an entitlement but as an inviolable individual right. Kaminer further states that Jefferson's point of view was that the purpose of education is "self-government, not self-esteem."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
With his shock of silver-gray hair, his face etched by time with the lean expressiveness of a Giacometti sculpture and his soulful eyes registering every fleeting hurt and happiness, John Hurt bears a striking resemblance to Samuel Beckett in the distinguished British actor's magnificent rendition of "Krapp's Last Tape" at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. For anyone needing a reminder that theater can be an art (and not just a scrappy entertainment), this beautifully mounted production of Beckett's play, directed by Michael Colgan of Dublin's Gate Theatre, is not to be missed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Summer Lies Stories Bernhard Schlink Pantheon: 240 pp., $25.95 In the summer, it isn't easy being German. For a few weeks each year, the famously efficient German work routine grinds to a halt. Relaxation is the order of the day. People bound by blood and marriage spend long, listless hours together - whether they like it or not. The characters in Bernhard Schlink's new, revelatory collection of short stories, "Summer Lies," suffer through the forced intimacy of their family vacations.
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