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Happiness

NEWS
March 10, 1985 | LOUISE BRANSON, United Press International
Dictator Josef Stalin's 13-year-old American granddaughter is said to be stubbornly refusing to adjust to her new life in the Soviet Union--for her, an alien country whose language she does not speak. Soviet authorities, apparently seeking to coax teen-age Olga Peters into trying to adapt to her new home, have sent her to Stalin's native southern republic of Georgia.
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OPINION
October 14, 2009 | Barbara Ehrenreich, Barbara Ehrenreich is the author, most recently, of "Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America." A version of this article also appears at tomdispatch.com.
Feminism made women miserable. This, anyway, seems to be the most popular take-away from "The Paradox of Declining Female Happiness," a recent study by Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers that purports to show that women have become steadily unhappier since 1972. Maureen Dowd and Ariana Huffington greeted the news with somber perplexity, but the more common response has been a triumphant "I told you so!" On Slate's Double X website, a columnist concluded from the study that "the feminist movement of the 1960s and 1970s gave us a steady stream of women's complaints disguised as manifestos ... and a brand of female sexual power so promiscuous that it celebrates everything from prostitution to nipple piercing as a feminist act -- in other words, whine, womyn, and thongs."
BUSINESS
October 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Move over, peace and happiness. Computers are what Americans really want nowadays. The machines outrank peace, happiness and clothes this year as the most wished-for gifts, according to a U.S. survey by the Consumer Electronics Assn., an industry's trade organization. Last year, the most popular answer to the annual survey's open-ended query about respondents' holiday wishes was clothing, followed by peace and happiness, money and computers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
With his shock of silver-gray hair, his face etched by time with the lean expressiveness of a Giacometti sculpture and his soulful eyes registering every fleeting hurt and happiness, John Hurt bears a striking resemblance to Samuel Beckett in the distinguished British actor's magnificent rendition of "Krapp's Last Tape" at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. For anyone needing a reminder that theater can be an art (and not just a scrappy entertainment), this beautifully mounted production of Beckett's play, directed by Michael Colgan of Dublin's Gate Theatre, is not to be missed.
MAGAZINE
November 17, 1996
Wendy Kaminer's reflection on satisfaction ("The Inner You," Oct. 13) sees Thomas Jefferson "enshrining the pursuit of happiness as a national entitlement" in the same manner, one must suppose, as Social Security and Medicare have been so enshrined. Jefferson would be aghast. He saw the pursuit of happiness not as an entitlement but as an inviolable individual right. Kaminer further states that Jefferson's point of view was that the purpose of education is "self-government, not self-esteem."
WORLD
December 20, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Latin American countries are among the most upbeat in the world, while Singapore, Armenia and Iraq fall at the bottom in “positive emotions,” according to a Gallup poll released this week. Researchers who surveyed people in 148 countries found that Panama, Paraguay, El Salvador and Venezuela landed at the top when people were asked whether they had smiled, laughed and felt respected, rested and other positive emotions the previous day. In Panama and Paraguay, 85% of those surveyed said they felt such emotions the day before; only 46% said the same in Singapore.
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