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March 8, 1992
So now let me get this straight: Lee Ezell is saying that, because she was raped and forced to have the child, therefore all women who are raped (and all girls, too, apparently) should also be forced to bear any children with whom they are thus forced to become pregnant. Wow! I am very happy that Ms. Ezell has found happiness with her daughter. But her happiness does not give her or any other anti-choice zealots the right to force any other women or girls to bear unwanted children.
July 6, 1985
You are quite right pointing out in your editorial that cancer patients should not avoid medical treatments and rely on positive thinking alone. But let's not put down good feelings and happiness in the process of discounting pop psychology and folklore. Cancer patients' bodies are being attacked insidiously, causing profound physical changes as well as changes in behavior and self-esteem. We all choose how we feel emotionally and if cancer victims can choose to be happy, how much better they, and the people around them, will feel.
March 24, 1996
Like hundreds of other area residents, I start my day with The Times and a cup of coffee. Friday's [March 15] front page had such an impact on me, throughout the day, I wanted to share it. All three photographs spoke of love and compassion for those who hurt or for happiness, showing no age, color, religious or ethnic lines drawn. Thank you. HELEN L. ROBERTSON Woodland Hills
October 15, 1995
Reading Robert Eisner's article and letter ("Should Government Be Made Smaller--or Just Made Better?" and "Senators Missed Point on Social Security," Sept. 17) deepened my worry about the future of capitalism. While I am grateful for the benefits delivered to me by capitalism, I do not make the mistake of concluding that happiness now predicts happiness later. What about life 120 years from now--assuming we have an interest in the lives of our great-grandchildren's great-grandchildren?
March 17, 2012 | Jeannine Stein
We know filmmaker David Lynch for the dark surrealism of "Eraserhead," "Blue Velvet," "Inland Empire" and "Twin Peaks," as well as for his deep, abiding love of coffee. Lynch is also passionate about transcendental meditation, which he first took up "on a beautiful, sunny Saturday morning" in 1973. That passion spawned a book, "Catching the Big Fish," and the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and World Peace. Lynch spoke about what TM means for him and why others should try it too. Catch the longer podcast at
December 20, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Latin American countries are among the most upbeat in the world, while Singapore, Armenia and Iraq fall at the bottom in “positive emotions,” according to a Gallup poll released this week. Researchers who surveyed people in 148 countries found that Panama, Paraguay, El Salvador and Venezuela landed at the top when people were asked whether they had smiled, laughed and felt respected, rested and other positive emotions the previous day. In Panama and Paraguay, 85% of those surveyed said they felt such emotions the day before; only 46% said the same in Singapore.
October 14, 2009 | Barbara Ehrenreich, Barbara Ehrenreich is the author, most recently, of "Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America." A version of this article also appears at
Feminism made women miserable. This, anyway, seems to be the most popular take-away from "The Paradox of Declining Female Happiness," a recent study by Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers that purports to show that women have become steadily unhappier since 1972. Maureen Dowd and Ariana Huffington greeted the news with somber perplexity, but the more common response has been a triumphant "I told you so!" On Slate's Double X website, a columnist concluded from the study that "the feminist movement of the 1960s and 1970s gave us a steady stream of women's complaints disguised as manifestos ... and a brand of female sexual power so promiscuous that it celebrates everything from prostitution to nipple piercing as a feminist act -- in other words, whine, womyn, and thongs."
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