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Happiness

OPINION
July 9, 2006
Re "Happy? Let's Sum It Up," Column One, July 3 Happiness economics is apparently a legitimate field populated by behavioral scientists as well as those who would write for Forbes magazine. That people in Cuba come in second in happiness to those in our country attests to the fact that happiness unfolds from something other than palatial estates, Humvees, Rolls-Royces and designer everything. As a psychotherapist, I hear people wanting community more than anything in their lives.
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SCIENCE
November 24, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Fast food might make it harder to stop and smell the roses - and not just because of the overpowering aroma of French fries  - a new study from the University of Toronto argues. Researchers pointed out that Americans have gained more and more leisure time, yet they aren't any happier. The problem could be that modern conveniences that are supposed to save time actually make us more impatient, and therefore less able to savor small moments of joy. To test that theory, the University of Toronto researchers carried out three different tests focused on happiness and quintessentially American “symbols of the culture of impatience”: fast foods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1992
So now let me get this straight: Lee Ezell is saying that, because she was raped and forced to have the child, therefore all women who are raped (and all girls, too, apparently) should also be forced to bear any children with whom they are thus forced to become pregnant. Wow! I am very happy that Ms. Ezell has found happiness with her daughter. But her happiness does not give her or any other anti-choice zealots the right to force any other women or girls to bear unwanted children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1985
You are quite right pointing out in your editorial that cancer patients should not avoid medical treatments and rely on positive thinking alone. But let's not put down good feelings and happiness in the process of discounting pop psychology and folklore. Cancer patients' bodies are being attacked insidiously, causing profound physical changes as well as changes in behavior and self-esteem. We all choose how we feel emotionally and if cancer victims can choose to be happy, how much better they, and the people around them, will feel.
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