Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHappy Traum
IN THE NEWS

Happy Traum

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
The first folk concert that Happy Traum ever saw proved to be much more than just another night out. Traum was a New York City schoolboy when some of his classmates took him along to a Pete Seeger show in Brooklyn in 1954. Watching the dean of American folk singers that night, Traum recalls, he realized for the first time that "you could make music that's socially meaningful, that has historical and cultural value, and that can involve other people in some meaningful way.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Artie Traum, 65, a veteran songwriter and guitarist who came out of the seminal Greenwich Village folk music scene of the '60s, died Sunday at his home in Woodstock, N.Y., of cancer that had spread to his liver, said manager Jeff Heiman. Born in 1943 and raised in the Bronx, Traum played in Greenwich Village with his brother, Happy Traum. The brothers would play together on and off for decades. Traum also recorded a series of solo albums and produced or recorded with some of the biggest names in folk, rock and jazz, from Bela Fleck to Pete Seeger, according to his website.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Artie Traum, 65, a veteran songwriter and guitarist who came out of the seminal Greenwich Village folk music scene of the '60s, died Sunday at his home in Woodstock, N.Y., of cancer that had spread to his liver, said manager Jeff Heiman. Born in 1943 and raised in the Bronx, Traum played in Greenwich Village with his brother, Happy Traum. The brothers would play together on and off for decades. Traum also recorded a series of solo albums and produced or recorded with some of the biggest names in folk, rock and jazz, from Bela Fleck to Pete Seeger, according to his website.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
The first folk concert that Happy Traum ever saw proved to be much more than just another night out. Traum was a New York City schoolboy when some of his classmates took him along to a Pete Seeger show in Brooklyn in 1954. Watching the dean of American folk singers that night, Traum recalls, he realized for the first time that "you could make music that's socially meaningful, that has historical and cultural value, and that can involve other people in some meaningful way.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2000 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When musicians wanted to rage against the machine in the early '60s, they didn't have the weaponry they do now. Instead of depth-charge drums and strafing electric instruments, it was a gentler war, conducted with acoustic guitars and verses that detailed injustices or roused a rally.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Zepeda, the former Bogart's booker, has stepped up his promoting schedule, with roots and alternative-rock offerings at the Foothill in Signal Hill and the Blue Cafe in downtown Long Beach. The Foothill, an old-time dance hall (recently immortalized by Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys in their song "Foothill Boogie"), is Zepeda's venue for a series of Thursday and Friday night concerts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the ear-wearying, all-surrounding din of drums, amplified guitars, digital keyboardsand scores of voices trying to speak over said cacophony, Greg and Margie Mirken set out once more to do the National Assn. of Music Merchants annual winter trade show in their own way: NAMM Unplugged. For 17 years, the Mirkens have run Shade Tree Stringed Instruments, a small but important hub of traditional acoustic music in Orange County.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who, at this time a year ago, could have predicted that: * The Soviet Union would be as dead as Elvis? * The general public would come to understand "Kurds" as something other than a word appearing in the same rhyme as Muffet and tuffet? * Enraged Guns N' Roses fans would almost re-create the last scene of "The Day of the Locust" in a St. Louis amphitheater? * An unglamorous band named Nirvana would be promoted to rock 'n' roll Valhalla (or at least the Top 5)?
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big Pink is for sale. Three bedrooms, two baths and a basement full of rock 'n' roll ghosts. The $149,000 asking price for an unremarkable shingled home in the hills above Woodstock may be a bargain or a bad joke--based on your reaction to the following word association test: Bob Dylan. The Band. Summer of 1967. Great White Wonder. Some readers may be puzzled, while others will cringe at the thought of yet another trip down boomer memory lane.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|