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Harbor Freeway Transitway

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989
A block-long stretch of 168th Street will be closed for eight months beginning today in the Harbor Gateway neighborhood to widen a bridge for the Harbor Freeway Transitway project, state transportation officials said. The block affected is between Denver Avenue and Estrella Avenue. During the closure, motorists will be rerouted onto Gardena Boulevard, California Department of Transportation officials said. The transit project is scheduled to add a 10.3-mile roadway for buses and high-occupancy vehicles to the Harbor Freeway.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly one year after carpoolers began driving on the Harbor Freeway transitway, the first road built over a Los Angeles freeway, one of the last segments of the project will open today--new onramps and offramps at Adams Boulevard. Once the construction barriers and orange cones come down, motorists in all traffic lanes should be able to legally drive 55 mph again--traffic permitting, of course--through the stretch south of downtown.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly one year after carpoolers began driving on the Harbor Freeway transitway, the first road built over a Los Angeles freeway, one of the last segments of the project will open today--new onramps and offramps at Adams Boulevard. Once the construction barriers and orange cones come down, motorists in all traffic lanes should be able to legally drive 55 mph again--traffic permitting, of course--through the stretch south of downtown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1996 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the best things about driving on the new elevated roadway on the Harbor Freeway is that you don't even notice that you're five stories above one of the nation's busiest roads. You can't see the traffic below. Nor can you hear it. And, you move a lot faster! Best of all, you're on the top. You don't have to worry about being under the imposing concrete structure in an earthquake, despite Caltrans' assurances that it is safe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1996 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the best things about driving on the new elevated roadway on the Harbor Freeway is that you don't even notice that you're five stories above one of the nation's busiest roads. You can't see the traffic below. Nor can you hear it. And, you move a lot faster! Best of all, you're on the top. You don't have to worry about being under the imposing concrete structure in an earthquake, despite Caltrans' assurances that it is safe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1994
Caltrans will begin seismic reinforcement of 130 bridges in Los Angeles County and four in Ventura County in 1995, the state transportation agency announced Wednesday. The projects include 20 bridges on the San Diego Freeway, 19 on the Foothill Freeway and 18 on Interstate 5. The work involves enlarging and deepening the bridge footings, reinforcing the abutments and wrapping the columns with steel casings.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | SUSAN WOODWARD
The California Transportation Commission will begin construction of a transit center and park-and-ride facility in March at the Artesia and Harbor freeway interchange. Caltrans approved the $12.2-million development last month. The project will be built on a vacant 18-acre landfill southwest of the interchange, Caltrans spokesman Rick Holland said. The park-and-ride lot will hold 1,000 vehicles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1996
Re "Lanes' Debut a High Point for Carpoolers," June 27: The elevated carpool lanes on the Harbor Freeway are the latest, and most expensive, of Caltrans' politically correct boondoggles. As on the 134 Freeway between the 5 and the 170 before it, and on the 10 Freeway east of downtown before that, the congested tragic continues as slowly as ever, while the diamond lanes remain virtually empty. Rather than increasing the capacity of these roads by 20 or 25% (as these extra lanes would do if opened to all the citizens forced to foot the bill for them)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2002 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
Transportation officials are considering adding carpool lanes along surface streets through downtown Los Angeles and sections of skid row to close a three-mile gap between two crowded freeways. Proponents of the plan say it is much cheaper to use city streets to connect the carpool lanes on the Harbor Freeway Transitway and the El Monte Busway on the San Bernardino Freeway than to close the gap by building new carpool lanes on the existing freeways.
NEWS
July 27, 1985 | RAY HEBERT, Times Urban Affairs Writer
California is facing a $650-million cutback in its freeway development program over the next five years, and the major casualty will be the planned high-speed transitway above and on Los Angeles' Harbor Freeway, state transportation officials said. Construction was to have started late next year on the $556-million busway extending from downtown Los Angeles to San Pedro, but it will be delayed at least until 1990-1991, because federal highway funds are not available.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989
A block-long stretch of 168th Street will be closed for eight months beginning today in the Harbor Gateway neighborhood to widen a bridge for the Harbor Freeway Transitway project, state transportation officials said. The block affected is between Denver Avenue and Estrella Avenue. During the closure, motorists will be rerouted onto Gardena Boulevard, California Department of Transportation officials said. The transit project is scheduled to add a 10.3-mile roadway for buses and high-occupancy vehicles to the Harbor Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1989 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
As celebrations go, it wasn't much. Just the governor, a couple of congressmen and a handful of transportation experts getting together Friday morning to mark the start of construction on the $530-million Harbor Freeway Transit-way. Actually, construction on the double-decked structures started several weeks ago. But the dignitaries brushed that fact aside with a joke or two because they were really here to honor the Los Angeles freeway system and celebrate the creation of a "second generation of freeways" that, they say, will help solve the traffic crunch.
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