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Harbor Transitway Project

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1990 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traffic on the Harbor Freeway was turned into a commuter's nightmare Monday afternoon by an injury accident and the start of construction on a $55-million overhead deck for the crowded roadway. All morning, northbound traffic was slow-and-go because the heavy construction work in the freeway's median, between Slauson Avenue and Martin Luther King Boulevard, was attracting gawkers, but there were no major tie-ups, as had been predicted.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1990 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traffic on the Harbor Freeway was turned into a commuter's nightmare Monday afternoon by an injury accident and the start of construction on a $55-million overhead deck for the crowded roadway. All morning, northbound traffic was slow-and-go because the heavy construction work in the freeway's median, between Slauson Avenue and Martin Luther King Boulevard, was attracting gawkers, but there were no major tie-ups, as had been predicted.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1990 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to build a $55-million second deck over the crowded Harbor Freeway is not easy under any circumstances, but when state engineers last week suggested that the vital roadway would have to be closed periodically during rush hour over the next two years, the forces of convenience, economics and safety collided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1990 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to build a $55-million second deck over the crowded Harbor Freeway is not easy under any circumstances, but when state engineers last week suggested that the vital roadway would have to be closed periodically during rush hour over the next two years, the forces of convenience, economics and safety collided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1989 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
As celebrations go, it wasn't much. Just the governor, a couple of congressmen and a handful of transportation experts getting together Friday morning to mark the start of construction on the $530-million Harbor Freeway Transit-way. Actually, construction on the double-decked structures started several weeks ago. But the dignitaries brushed that fact aside with a joke or two because they were really here to honor the Los Angeles freeway system and celebrate the creation of a "second generation of freeways" that, they say, will help solve the traffic crunch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1989
The Redondo Beach Boulevard on-ramp to the northbound Harbor Freeway will be temporarily closed, California Department of Transportation officials announced. The ramp will remain closed until new on- and off-ramps are completed in February, 1990, Caltrans engineer Kent Mehta said. Motorists may use the northbound Rosecrans on-ramp, he said. The road work is part of the Harbor Transitway Project, a 4 1/2-year, $530-million project that will add a 10.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989
A block-long stretch of 168th Street will be closed for eight months beginning today in the Harbor Gateway neighborhood to widen a bridge for the Harbor Freeway Transitway project, state transportation officials said. The block affected is between Denver Avenue and Estrella Avenue. During the closure, motorists will be rerouted onto Gardena Boulevard, California Department of Transportation officials said. The transit project is scheduled to add a 10.3-mile roadway for buses and high-occupancy vehicles to the Harbor Freeway.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | SUSAN WOODWARD
The California Transportation Commission will begin construction of a transit center and park-and-ride facility in March at the Artesia and Harbor freeway interchange. Caltrans approved the $12.2-million development last month. The project will be built on a vacant 18-acre landfill southwest of the interchange, Caltrans spokesman Rick Holland said. The park-and-ride lot will hold 1,000 vehicles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1989 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Harbor Freeway motorists, long accustomed to seeing red because of fierce rush-hour traffic congestion, should soon be seeing double as well. Preliminary work on the double-decking of a 1.5-mile segment of the freeway is due to begin in earnest today with the temporary closure of two ramps for reconstruction, according to Caltrans officials. If the futuristic project--the first of its kind in Los Angeles--moves ahead on schedule, two elevated stretches totaling 2.25-miles will be opened for buses and car pools in 1993, according to officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996 | EALENA CALLENDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commuters on the clogged Harbor Freeway may get some relief when new carpool lanes, park-and-ride lots and transit stations open along a 10-mile stretch of the thoroughfare beginning this spring. At work since 1989, Caltrans is near completion of the $530-million Harbor Freeway-Transitway project to help alleviate congestion on the freeway. "It definitely gives some people incentive to either get out of their cars altogether or carpool," Caltrans spokesman Rick Holland said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1989 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
As celebrations go, it wasn't much. Just the governor, a couple of congressmen and a handful of transportation experts getting together Friday morning to mark the start of construction on the $530-million Harbor Freeway Transit-way. Actually, construction on the double-decked structures started several weeks ago. But the dignitaries brushed that fact aside with a joke or two because they were really here to honor the Los Angeles freeway system and celebrate the creation of a "second generation of freeways" that, they say, will help solve the traffic crunch.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the rest of the world was starting to get comfortable with the idea that Southern California, the archetypal kingdom of the private automobile, was starting to devote serious attention--and serious money--to mass transit, Jerry Baxter held another news conference.
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