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Haris Silajdzic

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NEWS
June 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bosnia's Muslims and Croats moved closer by selecting a joint government, but Bosnian Serbs remained doggedly outside efforts to establish peace after 26 months of war. The current head of Bosnia's federal government, Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic, was chosen to also lead the federation government. The assembly also agreed on a Cabinet that includes 14 Muslims, 13 Croats and one Serb. But the federation government lacks one basic prerequisite: territory.
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NEWS
January 22, 1996 | Reuters
Bosnian Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic announced Sunday that he will not retain his position in the country's new central government being formed on the basis of a peace accord signed in Paris last month. Hasan Muratovic, in charge of relations with the United Nations, is likely to be the new prime minister, central committee members of the ruling Party of Democratic Action, or SDA, said.
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NEWS
January 22, 1996 | Reuters
Bosnian Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic announced Sunday that he will not retain his position in the country's new central government being formed on the basis of a peace accord signed in Paris last month. Hasan Muratovic, in charge of relations with the United Nations, is likely to be the new prime minister, central committee members of the ruling Party of Democratic Action, or SDA, said.
NEWS
March 22, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Bosnian government and rebel Serb troops continued heavy fighting on Tuesday, Bosnian Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic laid blame on the international community for the unraveling cease-fire in his country. Silajdzic stopped short of pronouncing the 11-week-old truce dead. But he said the military attacks launched Monday by his government in central and northeastern Bosnia-Herzegovina were an inevitable outgrowth of what he regards as the world's indifference toward Bosnian Serb aggression.
NEWS
March 22, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Bosnian government and rebel Serb troops continued heavy fighting on Tuesday, Bosnian Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic laid blame on the international community for the unraveling cease-fire in his country. Silajdzic stopped short of pronouncing the 11-week-old truce dead. But he said the military attacks launched Monday by his government in central and northeastern Bosnia-Herzegovina were an inevitable outgrowth of what he regards as the world's indifference toward Bosnian Serb aggression.
NEWS
November 26, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Alija Izetbegovic, once revered by Bosnian Muslims as their spiritual father, has been knocked from his esteemed pedestal by nearly 20 months of a losing war and a seemingly endless series of misjudgments. Yet, rather than submitting to a demoralizing leadership change to replace the man who has ruled during Bosnia's progressive destruction, detractors and supporters alike appear to be working around him.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | Reuters
The Bosnian government Thursday refused to renew a four-month truce that expires at the end of this month and accused the international community of indifference toward Bosnia's suffering. U.N. special envoy Yasushi Akashi met for two hours with Bosnian Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic but failed to persuade him or his Serbian foes to extend the cease-fire beyond April 30 to give diplomats more time to find a negotiated settlement.
WORLD
May 20, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Vice President Joe Biden promised that Washington would help Balkan nations join the European Union, and he urged Bosnian lawmakers to set aside their differences and work together across party and ethnic lines. "The door is open for the countries of this region for the first time in history to be an integral part of a free Europe," Biden said in Bosnia's parliament. "The U.S. will help you walk through that door." Biden was in Sarajevo on the first stop in a three-day tour of the Balkans meant to demonstrate renewed interest in the region.
NEWS
December 18, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Military commanders agreed Friday on Christmas truces in Croatia and Bosnia, providing at least a flicker of hope for holiday peace in the former Yugoslav federation. Announcement of the two separate agreements coincided with new talks to try to end a war that has killed an estimated 200,000 people in Bosnia-Herzegovina and left more than 2 million homeless.
NEWS
January 21, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Secretary of State Warren Christopher has sent a letter to the Muslim-led Bosnian government saying that the United States may begin direct talks with the Bosnian Serbs, the New York Times reported today. Christopher wrote that direct ties would be contingent on the Serbs abiding by the terms of a New Year's cease-fire and opening roads out of Sarajevo, the Times reported. Direct talks with the Serbs would violate a U.N. Security Council resolution barring such contacts.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bosnia's Muslims and Croats moved closer by selecting a joint government, but Bosnian Serbs remained doggedly outside efforts to establish peace after 26 months of war. The current head of Bosnia's federal government, Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic, was chosen to also lead the federation government. The assembly also agreed on a Cabinet that includes 14 Muslims, 13 Croats and one Serb. But the federation government lacks one basic prerequisite: territory.
NEWS
November 26, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Alija Izetbegovic, once revered by Bosnian Muslims as their spiritual father, has been knocked from his esteemed pedestal by nearly 20 months of a losing war and a seemingly endless series of misjudgments. Yet, rather than submitting to a demoralizing leadership change to replace the man who has ruled during Bosnia's progressive destruction, detractors and supporters alike appear to be working around him.
NEWS
January 19, 1994 | Times Wire Services
A new round of Bosnia peace talks appeared doomed to failure Tuesday, after a day of fruitless wrangling over a map dividing the former Yugoslav republic into three ethnic ministates. Bosnian Serb, Muslim and Croat leaders agreed to prolong their negotiations into a second day today but held out little hope of an agreement to end the 21-month-old conflict in Bosnia-Herzegovina. "The atmosphere around the negotiations has never been less conducive" to peace, U.N.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | From Reuters
Embattled Bosnia-Herzegovina was admitted to the United Nations on Friday, together with Croatia and Slovenia, and immediately urged the world body to defend it against aggression. The president of the General Assembly said the international community has a commitment to defend the new members' sovereignty. The United Nations now has 178 members, compared with only 51 when it was founded in 1945.
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