Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHarle Tinney
IN THE NEWS

Harle Tinney

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An enormous crystal chandelier hovers above the 38-person refectory table at Belcourt Castle here. From St. Petersburg, coos Harle Tinney as she guides a visitor through her family's 60-room mansion, built a century ago in the style of Louis XIII. Baloney, rejoins her adopted brother-in-law, Kevin Tinney, a plumber who showed up in 1974 to fix the heating system and ended up owning a third of the castle.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An enormous crystal chandelier hovers above the 38-person refectory table at Belcourt Castle here. From St. Petersburg, coos Harle Tinney as she guides a visitor through her family's 60-room mansion, built a century ago in the style of Louis XIII. Baloney, rejoins her adopted brother-in-law, Kevin Tinney, a plumber who showed up in 1974 to fix the heating system and ended up owning a third of the castle.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | CAROLYN THOMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For two miles along Bellevue Avenue, also known as "Millionaires' Row," stately mansions loom like fortresses behind gilded wrought-iron fences and towering stone walls. But times have changed for these relics of Newport's Golden Age, which have names like Chateau-Sur-Mer, Marble House and Belcourt Castle. Today, a dozen of the most opulent homes carry open invitations to anyone with the $6 to $7 price of admission. Busloads of tourists are the most frequent guests. Inheritance taxes and the enormous cost of upkeep have been the driving force behind much of the transition from private to public.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|