Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHarlequin Dinner Playhouse
IN THE NEWS

Harlequin Dinner Playhouse

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
The on-again, off-again deal to drop Broadway-style musicals at the Harlequin Dinner Playhouse is on again. The 450-seat dinner theater in Santa Ana will change formats to revues and celebrity acts after its current production, "Annie Get Your Gun," closes Sunday. Barbara Hampton, who owns the Harlequin with her husband, Al, said Friday that they are signing a long-term contract with the Young Americans Song and Dance Company, a troupe that performs and waits tables.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plans to reopen the former Harlequin Dinner Theatre as a pop concert club moved forward Tuesday night when the Santa Ana City Council approved a conditional-use permit for the facility. According to the permit application, the club would seat about 550 people and feature "national entertainment acts" in rock, comedy, rhythm and blues, jazz and country. The club will include a restaurant and full-service bar.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1987 | MARK CHALON SMITH
"Paint Your Wagon" is a throwback to a time when musicals were simple-hearted and simple-minded. No flashy special effects or sophisticated themes--just innocuous plot jazzed up with some lively singing and dancing. That formula works nicely at the Harlequin Dinner Playhouse in Santa Ana, where director Lynn Phillip Seibel has staged an old-fashioned and thoroughly likable revival of the 1951 Broadway hit about miners struggling through the California Gold Rush.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harlequin Dinner Playhouse, the Santa Ana dinner theater that became a short-lived concert club called Hamptons, has filed for protection from creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. bankruptcy code. The Harlequin's owners, Al and Barbara Hampton, listed assets for the club of $1 million and liabilities of $475,000 in documents filed earlier this week. Several radio stations with whom the club advertised were listed among the playhouse's creditors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1986
Harlequin Dinner Playhouse has extended the run of Lawrence Roman's comedy "'Alone Together" through April 13. The comedy, making its West Coast premiere at the Santa Ana dinner theater, revolves around a long-married couple who are looking forward to some peace and quiet now that their adult children have flown the nest, only to have the kids--and their problems--descend upon them once again. Reviewing the production for Calendar on Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
A deal to drop Broadway-style musicals at the Harlequin Dinner Playhouse in favor of lighter revues and occasional pop music concerts fell through at the 11th hour Thursday, a spokesman said. Al and Barbara Hampton, owners of the 450-seat theater in Santa Ana, had decided to abandon musical productions in a bid to attract a larger audience. They were negotiating a long-term contract with the Young American Song and Dance Company, a troupe that performs and waits tables.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harlequin Dinner Playhouse, the Santa Ana dinner theater that became a short-lived concert club called Hamptons, has filed for protection from creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. bankruptcy code. The Harlequin's owners, Al and Barbara Hampton, listed assets for the club of $1 million and liabilities of $475,000 in documents filed earlier this week. Several radio stations with whom the club advertised were listed among the playhouse's creditors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
It wasn't uncommon for commoners to attend Elizabethan comedies with mutton and brew in hand. And the well-tossed vaudeville tomato, apocryphal or not, has become a symbol for the purest of stage criticism. But these days, there doesn't seem to be much room for food in the theater, at least not those theaters that want respectability. Roast beef, mashed potatoes and middling wine just aren't seen as conducive to a dignified air. The tinkling sound of plates being carted away as the curtain rises, dessert and coffee served up during what should be the reflective moments of intermission . . . and besides, who comes to a theater to eat, anyway?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1987 | CATHY DE MAYO
The rehearsal had overtones of a family reunion. After a three-week layoff, cast members of "My One and Only" gathered in sweats and tap shoes on the stage at the Harlequin Dinner Playhouse in Santa Ana, where the spirited musical will open Friday after three nights of previews. The show has moved intact from its original home at Southampton, the San Clemente dinner theater acquired last summer by Al and Barbara Hampton, who also own the Harlequin.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989 | MAX JACOBSON
In an era that has overseen performance art, minimalist music and a near revolution in theater, one genre, the dinner theater, has retreated to a store of old chestnuts in an attempt to keep audiences. It's no accident that not long after "Oklahoma!" closes at the Grand Dinner Theatre in Anaheim, it will re-open at Elizabeth Howard's Curtain Call Dinner Theatre in Tustin. And it's no accident that all but one of Orange County's four operating dinner theaters are currently running musicals.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Coming from Cleveland, Allison Gappa always knew about tornadoes. "I've lived through some real disasters," she said. "I remember seeing trees fly past my window." But earthquakes? Never. It wasn't until she moved to California a decade ago that she felt the ground sway for the first time. "It scared me half to death," said Gappa, who lives in Orange and recently was named playwright-in-residence at the Way Off Broadway Playhouse in Santa Ana.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
The on-again, off-again deal to drop Broadway-style musicals at the Harlequin Dinner Playhouse is on again. The 450-seat dinner theater in Santa Ana will change formats to revues and celebrity acts after its current production, "Annie Get Your Gun," closes Sunday. Barbara Hampton, who owns the Harlequin with her husband, Al, said Friday that they are signing a long-term contract with the Young Americans Song and Dance Company, a troupe that performs and waits tables.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
A deal to drop Broadway-style musicals at the Harlequin Dinner Playhouse in favor of lighter revues and occasional pop music concerts fell through at the 11th hour Thursday, a spokesman said. Al and Barbara Hampton, owners of the 450-seat theater in Santa Ana, had decided to abandon musical productions in a bid to attract a larger audience. They were negotiating a long-term contract with the Young American Song and Dance Company, a troupe that performs and waits tables.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
It wasn't uncommon for commoners to attend Elizabethan comedies with mutton and brew in hand. And the well-tossed vaudeville tomato, apocryphal or not, has become a symbol for the purest of stage criticism. But these days, there doesn't seem to be much room for food in the theater, at least not those theaters that want respectability. Roast beef, mashed potatoes and middling wine just aren't seen as conducive to a dignified air. The tinkling sound of plates being carted away as the curtain rises, dessert and coffee served up during what should be the reflective moments of intermission . . . and besides, who comes to a theater to eat, anyway?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989 | MAX JACOBSON
In an era that has overseen performance art, minimalist music and a near revolution in theater, one genre, the dinner theater, has retreated to a store of old chestnuts in an attempt to keep audiences. It's no accident that not long after "Oklahoma!" closes at the Grand Dinner Theatre in Anaheim, it will re-open at Elizabeth Howard's Curtain Call Dinner Theatre in Tustin. And it's no accident that all but one of Orange County's four operating dinner theaters are currently running musicals.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1987 | MARK CHALON SMITH
"Paint Your Wagon" is a throwback to a time when musicals were simple-hearted and simple-minded. No flashy special effects or sophisticated themes--just innocuous plot jazzed up with some lively singing and dancing. That formula works nicely at the Harlequin Dinner Playhouse in Santa Ana, where director Lynn Phillip Seibel has staged an old-fashioned and thoroughly likable revival of the 1951 Broadway hit about miners struggling through the California Gold Rush.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Coming from Cleveland, Allison Gappa always knew about tornadoes. "I've lived through some real disasters," she said. "I remember seeing trees fly past my window." But earthquakes? Never. It wasn't until she moved to California a decade ago that she felt the ground sway for the first time. "It scared me half to death," said Gappa, who lives in Orange and recently was named playwright-in-residence at the Way Off Broadway Playhouse in Santa Ana.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plans to reopen the former Harlequin Dinner Theatre as a pop concert club moved forward Tuesday night when the Santa Ana City Council approved a conditional-use permit for the facility. According to the permit application, the club would seat about 550 people and feature "national entertainment acts" in rock, comedy, rhythm and blues, jazz and country. The club will include a restaurant and full-service bar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1987 | CATHY DE MAYO
The rehearsal had overtones of a family reunion. After a three-week layoff, cast members of "My One and Only" gathered in sweats and tap shoes on the stage at the Harlequin Dinner Playhouse in Santa Ana, where the spirited musical will open Friday after three nights of previews. The show has moved intact from its original home at Southampton, the San Clemente dinner theater acquired last summer by Al and Barbara Hampton, who also own the Harlequin.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1986
Harlequin Dinner Playhouse has extended the run of Lawrence Roman's comedy "'Alone Together" through April 13. The comedy, making its West Coast premiere at the Santa Ana dinner theater, revolves around a long-married couple who are looking forward to some peace and quiet now that their adult children have flown the nest, only to have the kids--and their problems--descend upon them once again. Reviewing the production for Calendar on Feb.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|