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Harley Davidson Motor Co

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BUSINESS
July 13, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harley-Davidson Motor Co., the Milwaukee-based maker of motorcycles with outlaw appeal, is taking aim with a new line of bikes at the younger, more technology-conscious buyers wooed by Japan's motorcycle makers. The Harley, to be introduced at the company's annual dealers meeting in Los Angeles on Monday, uses a derivative of a high-tech, liquid-cooled twin-cylinder racing engine developed by Harley and Germany's Porsche Engineering for the Superbike race series.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harley-Davidson Motor Co., the Milwaukee-based maker of motorcycles with outlaw appeal, is taking aim with a new line of bikes at the younger, more technology-conscious buyers wooed by Japan's motorcycle makers. The Harley, to be introduced at the company's annual dealers meeting in Los Angeles on Monday, uses a derivative of a high-tech, liquid-cooled twin-cylinder racing engine developed by Harley and Germany's Porsche Engineering for the Superbike race series.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 1986 | RONALD J. OSTROW and GREG LUCAS, Times Staff Writers
The four Japanese motorcycle makers that dominate the U.S. market are under federal criminal antitrust investigation to determine whether they fixed prices or illegally allocated markets in the early 1980s, Justice Department officials acknowledged Tuesday. The investigation, under way since 1984, has been transferred from a grand jury in Los Angeles to one in Columbus, Ohio, making it easier for Washington-based department attorneys to conduct the case, the officials said. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1995 | JEFF BEAN
The sign at a lumberyard along Interstate 5 says simply, "Do You Know Willie G." Apparently, quite a few people think they do. The sign at Timberline Redwood Co. has drawn attention from a former New York Jets football player who claims to be Willie G., and from fans of the 1960s rock band the Midnighters, which had a member known as Willie G. A number of motorcyclists have been stopping by too, and the owner of Timberline says they have the right answer: "Willie G." is Willie G.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1996 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It will be dressed like a Harley-Davidson motorcycle, with a teardrop gas tank, a saddlebag seat and flared fenders. And its $2,200 price tag is aimed squarely at upscale consumers who wouldn't blink an eye at dropping $10,000 or more for a Harley-Davidson Motor Co. hog. But when it comes to power, the limited-edition cruising bike that GT Bicycles and Harley-Davidson are combining to produce will be measured in pedal power rather than cubic centimeters.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2006 | Cyndia Zwahlen, Special to The Times
A program to train, test and certify manufacturing production workers is being launched this week by the Manufacturing Skill Standards Council and the National Assn. of Manufacturers. The council will offer the program through assessment centers nationwide, including 11 at Southern California community colleges.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Cook's Corner, in Orange County, has long been a haven for area motorcyclists. But the legendary Trabuco Canyon roadhouse was more jammed than usual Wednesday. Scores of bikers had gathered to get a glimpse of two new motorcycles unveiled by Harley-Davidson Motor Co. for the 2012 model year: a laid-back Sportster called the Seventy-Two and a Softail Slim retro bobber. Harley-Davidson typically introduces all of its new models and updates at a single event in the summer. But with the market still soft in a tough economy, the Milwaukee manufacturer has in recent years wheeled out new bikes in the off-season.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2003 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Investors in Indian Motorcycle Corp. spent more than $145 million to find out there wasn't much demand for its product. The Gilroy, Calif., company that tried to revive the nation's oldest and once most popular motorcycle brand said Monday that it had halted production late last week and fired 380 employees. The move came after a decision by the main investor, Audax Group in Boston, to pull out after pumping more than $45 million into Indian Motorcycle over the last two years.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2008 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
Owning a chromed or custom Harley-Davidson is "not about transportation, it's about an experience," says the company's chief executive, James L. Ziemer. That's clear to even the most average of non-motorcycling Joes, who, on any given day, are likely to see T-shirts, leathers, window decals, cigarette lighters, bandannas and other paraphernalia emblazoned with the company's trademark bar and shield. But there's one Harley-Davidson Motor Co. item that hasn't been selling as well in the U.S.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | DUKE HELFAND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One by one, they park their shiny chrome motorcycles at the curb, joining a carnival of roaring engines and glaring headlights. They tell stories of the open road and mingle with veteran bikers and even the handful of Hells Angels who usually turn up. They look almost menacing, revving their monster Harley-Davidsons. Could there be danger in those studded leather jackets and scuffed cowboy boots? Not to worry. They're Rich Urban Bikers, or RUBs, a new and gentler breed of Harley riders.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1985 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
Three years ago, one of the nation's largest Kawasaki motorcycle dealers had a horrible hunch that he was about to become a dealer without a product. "I was worried that Kawasaki was about to pull its investment out of the United States," said Tom Gobreck, co-owner of Whittier Kawasaki. So he bought a second dealership from the industry's clear leader, Honda. His worries appeared to be warranted. In 1982, the company, whose U.S.
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