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Harley May

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trail boss Harley May first sensed trouble when one of his volunteer cowboys showed up for the cattle drive wearing a baseball cap. Sure enough, shortly after 60 head of cattle began the trek from San Juan Capistrano to a rodeo site in Rancho Santa Margarita on a sunny day last month, one of the weekend cowpunchers--a local Rotarian in real life--tumbled his mount into a gully.
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BUSINESS
May 14, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Harley-Davidson Inc. is evaluating whether to relocate work from York, Pa., its largest production site, to cut costs. The company told workers this week that those operations, which employ 2,400, aren't competitive. The Milwaukee company will assess the plant during the next several months and hold talks with union members.
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NEWS
June 23, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trail boss Harley May first sensed trouble when one of his volunteer cowboys showed up for the cattle drive wearing a baseball cap. Sure enough, shortly after 60 head of cattle began the trek from San Juan Capistrano to a rodeo site in Rancho Santa Margarita on a sunny day last month, one of the weekend cowpunchers--a local Rotarian in real life--tumbled his mount into a gully. "We had to use ropes to get the horse out and, fortunately, nobody was hurt," May said, shaking his head.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trail boss Harley May first sensed trouble when one of his volunteer cowboys showed up for the cattle drive wearing a baseball cap. Sure enough, shortly after 60 head of cattle began the trek from San Juan Capistrano to a rodeo site in Rancho Santa Margarita on a sunny day last month, one of the weekend cowpunchers--a local Rotarian in real life--tumbled his mount into a gully. "We had to use ropes to get the horse out and, fortunately, nobody was hurt," May said, shaking his head.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Harley-Davidson Inc. is evaluating whether to relocate work from York, Pa., its largest production site, to cut costs. The company told workers this week that those operations, which employ 2,400, aren't competitive. The Milwaukee company will assess the plant during the next several months and hold talks with union members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2000
I heartily concur with Harley Shaiken's May 16 commentary, "China, Mexico: Same Depressing Tale on Labor Rights." I was born in China and raised as an atheist and Communist. China is controlled by a handful of hard-liners. All dissent has been quietly silenced. There is no guarantee that China will abide by the rules of the World Trade Organization. Human rights conditions have worsened through the years. Protests against Chinese human rights violations at the U.N. have proven to be futile nine years in a row, because China has veto power.
SPORTS
April 11, 2002 | BOB MIESZERSKI
The hottest horse in action tonight at Los Alamitos is Hallelujah Train. A 4-year-old gelding owned and trained by Jaime Gomez, Hallelujah Train has won three in a row and will step up in class again to take on $50,000 claimers at 300 yards in the seventh of eight races. After losing 19 of his first 21 races, the Texas-bred started his streak with a nose victory Jan. 19, won by a half-length Feb. 8, then prevailed by a neck March 10.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA
It was a cattle drive straight out of a Western. The only thing missing was the movie camera. In a real-life version of the film "City Slickers," the greenhorns nearly outnumbered the steers on Thursday as cattle were herded to the site of this weekend's Rancho Santa Margarita Fiesta Rodeo. There were 20 would-be cowpokes--local Rotarians, computer engineers and general contractors--to watch 60 head of cattle. And five real ranch hands to shepherd the would-be cowpokes. It wasn't enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1992 | ROSE KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the heat, Steve Dulmage firmly gripped the flat, braided rope with one hand as he struggled to stay atop the bucking bull, but he tumbled into the air and hit the dust in less than five seconds. Despite an aching body, the 23-year-old Rancho Santa Margarita construction worker had no regrets about performing in his first professional rodeo. He was eager to have a second chance at bull riding--one of America's most dangerous sports.
SPORTS
October 19, 2007 | Pete Thomas, ON THE OUTDOORS
BIG BEAR LAKE -- The large cougar steps gingerly to the water's edge -- careful not to wet its paws -- and sips from a pool. The night is cloudy, breezy, cold and dark. We stand motionless only a few feet away, watching, wondering if this predator can even see us, or if it is simply ignoring us. But our presence is detected by another large cat, which saunters forth and, in an unbelievable display, bounds 20 feet up a tree to catch a better view of the intruders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trail boss Harley May first sensed trouble when one of his volunteer cowboys showed up for the cattle drive wearing a baseball cap. Sure enough, shortly after 60 head of cattle began the trek from San Juan Capistrano to a rodeo site in Rancho Santa Margarita on a sunny day last month, one of the weekend cowpunchers--a local Rotarian in real life--tumbled his mount into a gully.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a ridge overlooking a wide vista of rolling hills covered with grass, cactus and wildflowers, the scene on Monday looked as it must have to cowboys more than a century ago. Cows and their calves drinking peacefully at a pond were surrounded by men on horseback who would close in on them slowly, stealthily; then twirl their ropes to urge the herd down the trail toward a corral. A central tradition of the Old West, the annual cattle roundup was played out Monday in South County five miles off busy Interstate 5 at Rancho Mission Viejo, one of California's largest operating cattle ranches.
AUTOS
July 18, 2007 | SUSAN CARPENTER
Baltimore THESE days, it's hard to know who's following whom. Harley-Davidson may be the undisputed market leader in the cruiser world, but the new models it's wheeled out for 2008 show exactly how influential small custom shops have become. Take the Rocker C, one of three new models the company has unveiled, the other two being the Fat Bob (an addition to the Dyna family) and the Rocker (a Softail sib to the Rocker C).
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