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Harold Brown

NATIONAL
June 14, 2010 | By Tom Hamburger and Kim Geiger, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Deepwater Horizon oil rig that exploded in the Gulf of Mexico was built in South Korea. It was operated by a Swiss company under contract to a British oil firm. Primary responsibility for safety and other inspections rested not with the U.S. government but with the Republic of the Marshall Islands — a tiny, impoverished nation in the Pacific Ocean. And the Marshall Islands, a maze of tiny atolls, many smaller than the ill-fated oil rig, outsourced many of its responsibilities to private companies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Alex Pham and Ben Fritz
A case pitting the world's biggest game company against two of the industry's top developers is increasingly looking like a messy celebrity divorce. As the lawsuits involvingActivision Blizzard Inc.and former employees Jason West and Vincent Zampella head to court next week, documents spilling into the public eye give a rare glimpse of a relationship that began to deteriorate long before the actual split-up in March 2010 when the company fired West and Zampella. FromĀ a previous Times report, Activision had contingencies planned for life without West and Zampella, the heads of a game studio that developed the company's multibillion-dollar Call of Duty series.
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | From the Washington Post
The United States put a new aircraft carrier, the Theodore Roosevelt, into active service Saturday in a festive ceremony that contrasted with the ship's difficult birth. Roosevelt descendants attended the commissioning, but a former President who was not there, Jimmy Carter, was one of the centers of attention. Carter attempted to abort the Roosevelt in 1979, vetoing legislation containing money for its construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1990 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Regional air-quality officials adopted a measure Tuesday that would enable them to go to court if necessary to shut down Lopez Canyon Landfill. The South Coast Air Quality Management District's hearing board voted 3 to 2 in favor of an order requiring noxious gas emissions and odors to be kept in check at the controversial landfill, whose operations and alleged health hazards have been the subject of public hearings over the last year.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2003 | Elizabeth Levin, Times Staff Writer
The 184 people who died at the Pentagon in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks will be commemorated by individual benches and lighted reflecting pools, the Department of Defense said Monday. An 11-member committee, selected by the Pentagon, chose "Light Benches," by New York architects Julie Beckman and Keith Kaseman, from 1,126 entries submitted by an international group of designers.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Here is Forbes magazine's 1988 list of the 400 richest Americans in descending order of wealth, showing estimated fortune in millions, residence, source of wealth and age. Duplicated numbers represent ties; boldfaced entries are used to designate Californians. 1) Sam Moore Walton, $6,700, Bentonville, Ark., Wal-Mart Stores, 70. 2) John Werner Kluge, $3,200, Charlottesville, Va., Metromedia, 75. 3) Henry Ross Perot, $3,000 Dallas, Electronic Data Systems, 58.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | CAROLYN THOMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For two miles along Bellevue Avenue, also known as "Millionaires' Row," stately mansions loom like fortresses behind gilded wrought-iron fences and towering stone walls. But times have changed for these relics of Newport's Golden Age, which have names like Chateau-Sur-Mer, Marble House and Belcourt Castle. Today, a dozen of the most opulent homes carry open invitations to anyone with the $6 to $7 price of admission. Busloads of tourists are the most frequent guests. Inheritance taxes and the enormous cost of upkeep have been the driving force behind much of the transition from private to public.
OPINION
April 1, 2013 | By Donald Gregg
President Obama's recent Middle East trip showed what good things can result from thoughtful, direct presidential involvement. The president addressed young Israelis, reassured allies in the region and brokered an Israeli apology to Turkey for a deadly raid on a flotilla attempting to take supplies to Gaza. The president should employ that same sort of diplomacy toward North Korea. An increasingly dangerous confrontation is building between the United States and North Korea. The outrageous rhetoric pouring out of Pyongyang makes it difficult to do anything more than dismiss North Korea's leader, Kim Jong Un. But abandoning diplomacy would be extremely dangerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eileen Slocum, 92, the grand dame of society in Newport, R.I., who lived in a Gilded Age mansion along Millionaires' Row and who until early this year was a member of the Republican National Committee, died Sunday after being hospitalized with pneumonia. Slocum lived in the Harold Carter Brown House, a Gothic Revival-style estate built in the 1890s by her uncle, a member of the wealthy family that established Brown University. In her mansion, Slocum held fundraisers and parties for President Ford, Sen. Elizabeth Dole (R-N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Robert F. Christy, a physicist who was a key member of the Manhattan Project team that created the atomic bomb during World War II, died Wednesday at his Pasadena home. He was 96. Christy, who spent 40 years as a Caltech professor and administrator, died of natural causes, the university announced. In 1943, he joined the hundreds of scientists working on the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, N.M., to develop the nuclear bomb. He was hand-picked by project director J. Robert Oppenheimer, with whom Christy had studied quantum mechanics at UC Berkeley.
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