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Harold C Heinze

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BUSINESS
April 28, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold C. Heinze is the man Alaska's environmentalists love to hate. The outspoken former oil executive once called the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge "a flat, crummy place." He termed environmentalists "extremists" trying to "strangle Alaska." His confrontational style may even have hastened his abrupt departure last July from a high-profile job at image-conscious Atlantic Richfield Co. after a 25-year career, industry sources say.
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BUSINESS
April 28, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold C. Heinze is the man Alaska's environmentalists love to hate. The outspoken former oil executive once called the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge "a flat, crummy place." He termed environmentalists "extremists" trying to "strangle Alaska." His confrontational style may even have hastened his abrupt departure last July from a high-profile job at image-conscious Atlantic Richfield Co. after a 25-year career, industry sources say.
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BUSINESS
May 15, 1987
Arco, Los Angeles, said Harrell L. (Skip) Bilhartz has been named president of its Arco Coal Co. unit. His predecessor, Mike R. Bowlin, was recently named senior vice president-international oil and gas acquisitions at Arco. Separately, Arco said Harold C. Heinze, president of Arco Alaska Inc., will become president of Arco Transportation Co. Hiram E. Bond, the current president, is taking early retirement. William E. Wade Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1987
Your editorial (Dec. 3), "The Real Energy Crisis," suggested there is no urgency to develop new domestic supplies of petroleum, such as the potentially giant reserves in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge on Alaska's North Slope. The statistics show otherwise. Foreign oil imports are now at a dangerously high level; the American Petroleum Institute reports that in September, this nation imported nearly 45% of the oil we use. That figure is expected to grow as our domestic supplies dwindle and low oil prices discourage domestic exploratory drilling.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atlantic Richfield on Tuesday announced several management changes that the company said were part of a corporate strategy of giving management employees experience in various parts of the oil giant, but at least some of the moves were prompted by the resignation of the president of Arco's pipeline unit. In addition, Los Angeles-based Arco appointed an environmentalist to its board of directors. The new director, Frank D. Boren, was president of the Nature Conservancy from 1987 to January, 1990.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Water expert Dean Mann didn't mince words Wednesday when he told a congressional workshop exactly what he thought of a proposal for an undersea pipeline to bring water from Alaska to parched California. "I think it is really a far-out idea," said Mann, a former staff member of the National Water Commission. "I think the cost is just so extraordinary that I cannot see it happening." Mann joined Alaska Gov. Walter J.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal and state officials are investigating allegations that Exxon Corp. illegally shipped hazardous wastes in the ballast water of its oil tankers to a treatment plant in Alaska, stirring up a hornet's nest among legislators and imperiling talks to settle lawsuits arising from the 1989 Alaskan oil spill. Exxon denies wrongdoing. Meanwhile, Atlantic Richfield Co.
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