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Harold C Simmons

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BUSINESS
June 13, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Texas investor Harold C. Simmons has increased his holdings in Lockheed to 6.2% of the aerospace firm's outstanding shares, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing Monday. Simmons began buying Lockheed shares last year and had accumulated 5.3% of the firm's stock by April, just before Lockheed announced a broad restructuring that in part bolstered its takeover defenses. Calling the restructuring a negative development, Simmons then cut his holdings to 4.2%. Despite his renewed interest in Lockheed, Simmons said in an interview Monday, "I don't have any plan to take over the company."
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BUSINESS
December 8, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed lost a $30-million jury verdict Monday to Texas investor Harold Simmons, who alleged in a federal suit in Los Angeles that the aerospace giant failed to disclose critical information in battling his 1990 takeover effort. Again at loggerheads with Simmons, Lockheed said that the suit "has no merit" and that it would seek to have the verdict overturned or would appeal. Simmons charged that Lockheed violated U.S.
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BUSINESS
March 20, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Texas investor Harold C. Simmons walks away from his failed two-year bid for control of Lockheed Corp. battered and bruised and--like so many of the financial princes of the 1980s--probably relegated to the sidelines of the takeover business. After all, Simmons-controlled NL Industries lost millions Monday when it abandoned a proxy fight for control of Lockheed's board. Analysts say the Texan probably took a $100-million hit.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed and its dissident shareholder Harold C. Simmons fought, bickered, maneuvered, nagged, criticized and lobbied against each other for 31 months during one of Wall Street's longest takeover battles. As the smoke clears from the battlefield after Simmons' sale of his Lockheed shares, the results are: * Simmons lost an estimated $100 million or more on the stock, proxy battle and financing. * Lockheed lost $20 million in battling Simmons.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Texas investor Harold C. Simmons on Monday sold most of his 19.8% stake in Lockheed Corp. for $486 million, opting to cut his losses rather than prolong an expensive, bitter, two-year battle for control of the Calabasas-based aerospace giant. Simmons, who held the stake through his Houston-based NL Industries Inc., sold 12 million of his 12.5 million shares to Salomon Bros. for $40.50 a share.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In rival proxy statements formally launching their campaigns for control of Lockheed Corp., Lockheed management and a competing faction led by Texas investor Harold C. Simmons accused each other of lacking the skills to efficiently lead the giant aerospace firm. The Calabasas-based firm's management, in proxy materials mailed to shareholders Thursday, sought to contrast its performance with that of Simmons-controlled NL Industries, a Houston-based chemical firm that owns 19.8% of Lockheed stock.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed's directors Friday rejected Texas investor Harold C. Simmons' latest bid for seats on the company's board, a move that ensures a second proxy war between the Simmons camp and Lockheed management for control of the aerospace firm. Lockheed's board voted unanimously to rebuff Simmons, who controls NL Industries, a Houston-based chemical company that owns 19.8% of Lockheed. The board was responding to a letter Tuesday from NL President J.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Texas investor Harold C. Simmons Tuesday issued a new ultimatum to Lockheed Corp., declaring that he would launch a second proxy fight for control of the company unless management allows its shareholders to decide whether Simmons' camp should be alloted three seats on Lockheed's board.
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