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Harold Camping

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2013 | Mitchell Landsberg
Harold Camping didn't live to see the end of the world. The Oakland-based radio preacher, who died Sunday, drew international attention, much of it in the form of ridicule, when he predicted - more than once - the precise date of the Rapture and then had to concede his error. He was 92. Camping died at his home in Alameda after suffering a fall last month, according to a statement from his Family Radio Network . Convinced that he had unlocked hidden clues in the Bible, Camping predicted the end of the world no fewer than 12 times, beginning in 1978, according to an aide, and was persistent in the face of his repeated failures.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2013 | Mitchell Landsberg
Harold Camping didn't live to see the end of the world. The Oakland-based radio preacher, who died Sunday, drew international attention, much of it in the form of ridicule, when he predicted - more than once - the precise date of the Rapture and then had to concede his error. He was 92. Camping died at his home in Alameda after suffering a fall last month, according to a statement from his Family Radio Network . Convinced that he had unlocked hidden clues in the Bible, Camping predicted the end of the world no fewer than 12 times, beginning in 1978, according to an aide, and was persistent in the face of his repeated failures.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Oakland -- Harold Camping's promised final show Thursday night was much like his others. For an hour and a half, before a backdrop of wood paneling and fake plants in an Oakland studio, the self-styled scriptural scholar fielded calls from the devout, the derisive and the curious. He is 89 and bone-thin, making the leather-bound Bible on his lap seem enormous, and his voice was slow and unflappable. Near the show's end, Camping cut short a caller to announce that this would be his last appearance on the "Open Forum" TV and radio show he's hosted for decades.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
You may think we're just electing a president in November. But to listen to the Republican candidates, it's far bigger than that. Here's Mitt Romney, fresh off his Florida primary win in January: "This campaign is about more than replacing a president; it is about saving the soul of America. " And here's Rick Santorum, talking about President Obama's healthcare reform law this month to a gathering of the GOP faithful in Bowling Green, Ohio: "The siren song of government taking care of us will finally have our ship crash on the rocks, and we will become dependent if 'Obamacare' is implemented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
Sue Espinoza was planted before the television, awaiting news of her father's now infamous prediction: cataclysmic earthquakes auguring the end of humanity. God's wrath was supposed to begin in New Zealand and then race across the globe, leaving millions of bodies wherever the clock struck 6 p.m. But the hours ticked by, and New Zealand survived. Time zone by time zone, the apocalypse failed to materialize. On Saturday morning, Espinoza, 60, received a phone call from her father, Harold Camping, the 89-year-old Oakland preacher who has spent some $100 million — and countless hours on his radio and TV show — announcing May 21 as Judgment Day. "He just said, 'I'm a little bewildered that it didn't happen, but it's still May 21 [in the United States]
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
You may think we're just electing a president in November. But to listen to the Republican candidates, it's far bigger than that. Here's Mitt Romney, fresh off his Florida primary win in January: "This campaign is about more than replacing a president; it is about saving the soul of America. " And here's Rick Santorum, talking about President Obama's healthcare reform law this month to a gathering of the GOP faithful in Bowling Green, Ohio: "The siren song of government taking care of us will finally have our ship crash on the rocks, and we will become dependent if 'Obamacare' is implemented.
OPINION
November 6, 2011 | By Jay Rubenstein
On Oct. 21, the world did not end, despite predictions by Christian radio personality Harold Camping. We have by now laughed him off, but perhaps we owe Camping one more serious hearing. I for one can't help but ask: What if the apocalypse had happened? Or if not "the" apocalypse, then at least something fairly apocalyptic? That is what occurred 900 years ago. Thousands of people expected the apocalypse, and they got it, though not the one they were expecting. What if that happened again?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2011 | Randy Lewis
Don't get Dolly Parton started about end-of-the-world prognosticators. The Country Music Hall of Fame member was raised and remains devoutly religious, as she demonstrated so artfully in her biblically rooted classic song "Coat of Many Colors. " But the firebrand singer, songwriter and businesswoman isn't remotely interested in giving an ounce of credence to doomsday scenarios espoused by mere mortals like Bay Area radio preacher Harold Camping. On her new album, "Better Day," Parton sounds in the first song, "In the Meantime," like she's been writing straight off the headlines Camping generated with his widely disseminated prediction that Judgment Day would come on May 21. Yet she wrote the bouncy song, which urges listeners to make the most of whatever time the human race has left rather than fretting about its obliteration, long before Camping's name was rolling off the tips of newscasters' tongues.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1990 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Chairman Daniel M. Tellep predicted victory for his incumbent directors Thursday after voting ended in a hotly contested board election, but he also offered major concessions to shareholders who supported the dissident slate of nominees led by Texas investor Harold C. Simmons. "We feel very positive about the vote," Tellep told reporters at a news conference after Lockheed's annual meeting.
OPINION
December 21, 2012
Re "NASA is target of doomsday anxiety," Dec. 20 NASA spokesman Dwayne Brown says he'll be glad when Saturday comes and the questions end. Personally, I expect Harold Camping to announce on Saturday that the Mayans miscalculated the date. Kymberleigh Richards Van Nuys ALSO: Letters: Dealing with Hamas Letters: A tantrum by the rich Letters: When dying isn't easy
OPINION
November 6, 2011 | By Jay Rubenstein
On Oct. 21, the world did not end, despite predictions by Christian radio personality Harold Camping. We have by now laughed him off, but perhaps we owe Camping one more serious hearing. I for one can't help but ask: What if the apocalypse had happened? Or if not "the" apocalypse, then at least something fairly apocalyptic? That is what occurred 900 years ago. Thousands of people expected the apocalypse, and they got it, though not the one they were expecting. What if that happened again?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2011 | Randy Lewis
Don't get Dolly Parton started about end-of-the-world prognosticators. The Country Music Hall of Fame member was raised and remains devoutly religious, as she demonstrated so artfully in her biblically rooted classic song "Coat of Many Colors. " But the firebrand singer, songwriter and businesswoman isn't remotely interested in giving an ounce of credence to doomsday scenarios espoused by mere mortals like Bay Area radio preacher Harold Camping. On her new album, "Better Day," Parton sounds in the first song, "In the Meantime," like she's been writing straight off the headlines Camping generated with his widely disseminated prediction that Judgment Day would come on May 21. Yet she wrote the bouncy song, which urges listeners to make the most of whatever time the human race has left rather than fretting about its obliteration, long before Camping's name was rolling off the tips of newscasters' tongues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
Sue Espinoza was planted before the television, awaiting news of her father's now infamous prediction: cataclysmic earthquakes auguring the end of humanity. God's wrath was supposed to begin in New Zealand and then race across the globe, leaving millions of bodies wherever the clock struck 6 p.m. But the hours ticked by, and New Zealand survived. Time zone by time zone, the apocalypse failed to materialize. On Saturday morning, Espinoza, 60, received a phone call from her father, Harold Camping, the 89-year-old Oakland preacher who has spent some $100 million — and countless hours on his radio and TV show — announcing May 21 as Judgment Day. "He just said, 'I'm a little bewildered that it didn't happen, but it's still May 21 [in the United States]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Oakland -- Harold Camping's promised final show Thursday night was much like his others. For an hour and a half, before a backdrop of wood paneling and fake plants in an Oakland studio, the self-styled scriptural scholar fielded calls from the devout, the derisive and the curious. He is 89 and bone-thin, making the leather-bound Bible on his lap seem enormous, and his voice was slow and unflappable. Near the show's end, Camping cut short a caller to announce that this would be his last appearance on the "Open Forum" TV and radio show he's hosted for decades.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1990 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Chairman Daniel M. Tellep predicted victory for his incumbent directors Thursday after voting ended in a hotly contested board election, but he also offered major concessions to shareholders who supported the dissident slate of nominees led by Texas investor Harold C. Simmons. "We feel very positive about the vote," Tellep told reporters at a news conference after Lockheed's annual meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
An influential Christian radio host, best-known for his failed predictions of the second coming of Christ, has run into more derision and criticism for telling listeners to abandon church. Harold Camping says his Bible studies have revealed that what he calls "the church age" has ended. He has told his worldwide radio audience that Satan has taken over all churches.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2011
A roundup of entertainment headlines for Friday. Bad news for fans of old Terminators: Arnold Schwarzenegger is putting his acting career on hold. ( Los Angeles Times ) Disney spent $563 million for social gaming company Playdom. But that investment isn't going to pay off for a long time. ( Los Angeles Times ) "American Idol" is down to two, and fan favorite Haley Reinhart isn't one of them. ( Los Angeles Times ) Katie Couric signed off for the final time from the CBS Evening News on Thursday night.
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