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Harold Freeman

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OPINION
May 2, 1993
Considering the outcome in Waco perhaps what we really need to control are Bibles and matches. HAROLD FREEMAN Torrance
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 2, 1993
Considering the outcome in Waco perhaps what we really need to control are Bibles and matches. HAROLD FREEMAN Torrance
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NEWS
January 7, 1987
The pandering conviction of Encino pornographic film producer Harold Freeman was upheld 2-1 by a 2nd District Court of Appeal panel. Prosecutors contended the women Freeman hired to perform in "Caught From Behind Part II" were prostitutes rather than actresses in a "theatrical production" as he claimed. He was the first film maker prosecuted under a 1982 state law aimed at increasing penalties for pimping and pandering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
Between his arrest in 1983 for producing the sex movie "Caught From Behind, Part II" and his final victory before the U.S. Supreme Court last week, Harold Freeman's video company turned out eight sequels to the movie. None of them was filmed in Los Angeles. That's just what the county prosecutors had in mind when they made Freeman a high-profile test case by charging him under a pandering law originally designed to combat street pimps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1987
Your editorial criticism of the perversion of the pandering law by law enforcement and the judiciary to convict movie maker Harold Freeman should be endorsed by all reasonable people. Unfortunately, The Times ignored the larger issue here; the abusive pandering law itself. This law, from our Puritan heritage, has merely created a victimless crime, and an outrageous assault against individual civil liberties. Enforcement of pandering laws oppresses rather than protects society, is a waste of law enforcement and judicial time, and an enormous waste of tax money.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
The district attorney's office is trying to revive a novel legal assault on pornography--rejected by the California Supreme Court in a case involving Hollywood sex film maker Harold Freeman--by appealing the case to the U.S. Supreme Court. Assistant Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
Between his arrest in 1983 for producing the sex movie "Caught From Behind, Part II" and his final victory before the U.S. Supreme Court last week, Harold Freeman's video company turned out eight sequels to the movie. None of them was filmed in Los Angeles. That's just what the county prosecutors had in mind when they made Freeman a high-profile test case by charging him under a pandering law originally designed to combat street pimps.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court, rejecting a novel legal assault on pornography, ruled unanimously Thursday that an anti-pandering law cannot be used to prosecute the producers of sexually explicit movies. The court said that prosecuting film makers for paying actors and actresses to perform actual sex acts in movies that have not been found legally obscene violates the constitutional right to free expression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1988
All charges against a Woodland Hills sex film producer were dropped Wednesday because of a recent state Supreme Court ruling barring the use of anti-pandering laws against producers of sexually explicit films. Van Nuys Superior Court Judge David P. Yaffe dismissed the seven pandering counts against Jerry Tennenbaum, 42. Tennenbaum was arrested in 1985 by Los Angeles police in a raid at a private home on Mulholland Drive in North Hollywood where two sex movies were being filmed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1988
Pandering charges against a Hollywood film producer have been dropped by the San Diego County district attorney's office because of a recent state Supreme Court ruling banning such prosecutions. Prosecutors dropped 10 pandering counts against Ronald Jeremy Hyatt, 34, a producer for Video Exclusions of Hollywood. "We have to yield to the state Supreme Court," Deputy Dist. Atty.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
The district attorney's office is trying to revive a novel legal assault on pornography--rejected by the California Supreme Court in a case involving Hollywood sex film maker Harold Freeman--by appealing the case to the U.S. Supreme Court. Assistant Dist. Atty.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court, rejecting a novel legal assault on pornography, ruled unanimously Thursday that an anti-pandering law cannot be used to prosecute the producers of sexually explicit movies. The court said that prosecuting film makers for paying actors and actresses to perform actual sex acts in movies that have not been found legally obscene violates the constitutional right to free expression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1987
Your editorial criticism of the perversion of the pandering law by law enforcement and the judiciary to convict movie maker Harold Freeman should be endorsed by all reasonable people. Unfortunately, The Times ignored the larger issue here; the abusive pandering law itself. This law, from our Puritan heritage, has merely created a victimless crime, and an outrageous assault against individual civil liberties. Enforcement of pandering laws oppresses rather than protects society, is a waste of law enforcement and judicial time, and an enormous waste of tax money.
NEWS
January 7, 1987
The pandering conviction of Encino pornographic film producer Harold Freeman was upheld 2-1 by a 2nd District Court of Appeal panel. Prosecutors contended the women Freeman hired to perform in "Caught From Behind Part II" were prostitutes rather than actresses in a "theatrical production" as he claimed. He was the first film maker prosecuted under a 1982 state law aimed at increasing penalties for pimping and pandering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1987 | From the Associated Press
A former traffic officer and call girl who wants to make an explicit movie demonstrating "safe sex" may proceed with a legal challenge to Los Angeles authorities' anti-pornography campaign, a federal appeals court has ruled. In a unanimous decision issued Tuesday, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals reinstated a civil rights suit filed by Norma Jean Almodovar and film maker R. N. Bullard seeking to halt the use of pandering laws against makers of adult movies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Woodland Hills physician who helped develop a revolutionary breast cancer drug has been named by President Clinton to the President's Cancer Panel. The panel, which reports directly to Clinton, has the potential to change national cancer research policy, said Dr. Dennis Slamon, who directs the Revlon / UCLA Women's Cancer Research Program at UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center.
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