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NEWS
January 12, 1989
A jury began deliberating charges against a Teamsters Union vice president and a local union official accused of participating in a $700,000 payroll-padding scheme. The labor racketeering and embezzlement trial of Harold Friedman and Anthony Hughes culminated a six-year effort by the Justice and Labor departments to turn up wrongdoing in the Cleveland power base of the late Teamsters international President Jackie Presser, who died in July without ever going on trial.
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NEWS
May 27, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teamsters Union Vice President Harold Friedman sat in the witness chair of a nearly empty federal courtroom and fought back the tears. "Am I still going to have a job--do I go on pension?" he asked plaintively. One of the nation's highest-paid unionists, Friedman, 68, was reeling from the pointed questions of a Justice Department lawyer about perks that he had extracted from his hometown Cleveland local after his conviction on federal racketeering charges last year.
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NEWS
January 11, 1989 | Associated Press
Wrapping up a 2 1/2-month labor racketeering trial, a federal prosecutor argued Tuesday that Teamsters union President Jackie Presser and two associates embezzled $700,000 to pay "friends or cronies" who did no union work. In closing arguments to jurors in U.S. District Court, prosecutor Stephen Jigger stressed the role of Presser's associates in the alleged embezzlement scheme. Presser died last July, more than two years after his indictment in the case.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The executive board of the Teamsters Union voted unanimously Saturday to reject a government proposal calling for five Teamster vice presidents to resign, scuttling efforts to settle the Justice Department's unprecedented racketeering suit against the nation's largest union. James T. Grady, general counsel of the 1.6-million-member union, branded the settlement proposed by U.S. Atty. Rudolph W. Giuliani "totally unacceptable."
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The executive board of the Teamsters Union voted unanimously Saturday to reject a government proposal calling for five Teamster vice presidents to resign, scuttling efforts to settle the Justice Department's unprecedented racketeering suit against the nation's largest union. James T. Grady, general counsel of the 1.6-million-member union, branded the settlement proposed by U.S. Atty. Rudolph W. Giuliani "totally unacceptable."
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of the Teamsters Union have held talks with federal prosecutors aimed at settling a massive civil racketeering lawsuit that seeks to rid the giant union of alleged corruption, knowledgeable sources said Sunday. A settlement formula discussed in preliminary talks involves a demand by the Justice Department that at least five members of the Teamsters national executive board--but not William J.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teamsters Union Vice President Harold Friedman sat in the witness chair of a nearly empty federal courtroom and fought back the tears. "Am I still going to have a job--do I go on pension?" he asked plaintively. One of the nation's highest-paid unionists, Friedman, 68, was reeling from the pointed questions of a Justice Department lawyer about perks that he had extracted from his hometown Cleveland local after his conviction on federal racketeering charges last year.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | United Press International
Teamsters Union President Jackie Presser and two associates pleaded innocent today to charges that they embezzled more than $700,000 from the union in a scheme to pay "ghost" employees at Presser's home local. At a morning arraignment before a federal magistrate, Presser, Teamsters Vice President Harold Friedman and Anthony Hughes, an officer of Teamsters Local 507, all pleaded innocent to charges of racketeering and embezzlement.
NEWS
April 26, 1988
Teamsters Union President Jackie Presser was dealt a setback in a federal appeals court ruling in Cleveland that denies him access to government documents compiled by federal prosecutors in their case against him. The U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a U.S. District Court ruling that granted Presser access to the documents containing possible evidence that a payroll-padding scheme at a Teamsters local in Cleveland was authorized by the FBI.
NEWS
January 23, 1988 | United Press International
A federal judge on Friday postponed the racketeering and embezzlement trial of Teamsters Union President Jackie Presser, whose lawyers asked for a delay to give him more time to recover from cancer. U.S. District Judge George White scheduled the next pretrial hearing for Feb. 16, a day after the trial was scheduled to have opened. Defense lawyers filed a request on Jan. 7 to seek a delay, contending that Presser is too ill from cancer treatments to help the defense prepare its case.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of the Teamsters Union have held talks with federal prosecutors aimed at settling a massive civil racketeering lawsuit that seeks to rid the giant union of alleged corruption, knowledgeable sources said Sunday. A settlement formula discussed in preliminary talks involves a demand by the Justice Department that at least five members of the Teamsters national executive board--but not William J.
NEWS
January 12, 1989
A jury began deliberating charges against a Teamsters Union vice president and a local union official accused of participating in a $700,000 payroll-padding scheme. The labor racketeering and embezzlement trial of Harold Friedman and Anthony Hughes culminated a six-year effort by the Justice and Labor departments to turn up wrongdoing in the Cleveland power base of the late Teamsters international President Jackie Presser, who died in July without ever going on trial.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | Associated Press
Wrapping up a 2 1/2-month labor racketeering trial, a federal prosecutor argued Tuesday that Teamsters union President Jackie Presser and two associates embezzled $700,000 to pay "friends or cronies" who did no union work. In closing arguments to jurors in U.S. District Court, prosecutor Stephen Jigger stressed the role of Presser's associates in the alleged embezzlement scheme. Presser died last July, more than two years after his indictment in the case.
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