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Harold G Christensen

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May 4, 1988 | From the Washington Post
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III has selected Harold G. Christensen, a prominent Utah trial lawyer, to fill the vacant No. 2 job at the Justice Department, Administration sources said Tuesday. The sources said Meese recommended Christensen to the White House on Monday as a replacement for Arnold I. Burns, who resigned March 29 to protest Meese's leadership of the department.
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NEWS
May 25, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Nearly two months after two top-level Justice Department officials resigned to distance themselves from Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III's legal difficulties, President Reagan Tuesday nominated replacements for Deputy Atty. Gen. Arnold I. Burns and Assistant Atty. Gen. William F. Weld. Harold G. Christensen, a veteran Utah lawyer, has been named to replace Burns in the department's No. 2 post. Edward S. G. Dennis Jr., the U.S.
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NEWS
May 25, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Nearly two months after two top-level Justice Department officials resigned to distance themselves from Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III's legal difficulties, President Reagan Tuesday nominated replacements for Deputy Atty. Gen. Arnold I. Burns and Assistant Atty. Gen. William F. Weld. Harold G. Christensen, a veteran Utah lawyer, has been named to replace Burns in the department's No. 2 post. Edward S. G. Dennis Jr., the U.S.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | From the Washington Post
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III has selected Harold G. Christensen, a prominent Utah trial lawyer, to fill the vacant No. 2 job at the Justice Department, Administration sources said Tuesday. The sources said Meese recommended Christensen to the White House on Monday as a replacement for Arnold I. Burns, who resigned March 29 to protest Meese's leadership of the department.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
Maryland Gov. William Donald Schaefer's letter to Santa Claus, typically, tries to impress the jolly old elf with his good behavior during the year. "I answered 100,000 letters from citizens who wrote to tell me they liked--or didn't like--what I was doing," Schaefer wrote Santa. "I even put on 212 silly hats, so the newspapers could take pictures of me in unflattering poses." Schaefer's wish list of 17 items is not typical, however.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's nomination of Richard L. Thornburgh to succeed Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III won unanimous approval Wednesday from the Senate Judiciary Committee and appeared headed for prompt confirmation by the full Senate. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), acting committee chairman, urged Senate Majority Leader Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.) to move the nomination quickly to the Senate floor so that Thornburgh could be approved before the chamber adjourns, possibly today, until Sept. 7.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | Associated Press
Asst. Atty. Gen. Charles L. Cooper, head of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, today became the latest close aide of embattled Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III to hand in his resignation. Cooper said in a letter to Meese that he will leave the department July 8. The resignation is "wholly unrelated to the controversy of today," the letter said in a reference to Meese's legal troubles and a recent series of departures by key aides at the Justice Department.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
The Senate voted unanimously Thursday to confirm Richard L. Thornburgh as attorney general in a move that members said would restore stability and integrity to the Justice Department following the departure of Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III. The 85-0 vote capped an unprecedentedly short, one-month confirmation process that stood in sharp contrast to the one-year inquiry the Senate conducted of Meese before approving his nomination in January, 1985.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
FBI Director William S. Sessions, barraged by questions about Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III's legal difficulties, said Thursday that, if the American public perceived that the FBI director was not legally or ethically carrying out his duties, "I always have open the route of resignation." Asked whether his comments should be interpreted to mean that he believes Meese should resign, Sessions told a press conference: "You'll have to draw your own conclusions. . . .
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