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Harold Greene

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2000 | From The Washington Post
Harold H. Greene, the much-admired federal judge who came to this country as a refugee from Nazi Germany and presided over one of the most far-reaching cases in American history--the antitrust suit that broke up American Telephone & Telegraph Co.--died Saturday at his home in Washington. He was 76. Greene, who had retired from the bench, died of a cerebral hemorrhage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2008 | Carla Rivera, Matea Gold and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles television news fixtures Harold Greene and Ann Martin will leave the anchor desks at KCBS-TV Channel 2 and KCAL-TV Channel 9 when their contracts expire in May, and about a dozen fellow staffers behind and in front of the camera have received pink slips at the sister CBS-affiliate stations. The layoffs were effective Monday and coincided with widespread layoffs at CBS affiliates nationwide, including San Francisco and New York.
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OPINION
September 6, 1998 | Jube Shiver Jr., Jube Shiver Jr. covers telecommunications policy and regulation for The Times
The artifacts decorating the office of Judge Harold H. Greene do not seem to be those of the man who spent more than a decade supervising one of the largest antitrust cases in U.S. history: the 1984 breakup of AT&T. Greene, who says he remains amazed at how celebrated his showdown with Ma Bell has become, has filled his office with photos and memorabilia of his accomplishments before the AT&T case. Now, as a celebrated new antitrust trial, the United States vs. Microsoft Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Harold Greene, anchor of the KCBS-TV 11 p.m. "news," who alerted me to the situation. This was Tuesday night, and "The Station of the People" had just finished a segment on how "Survivor" castoff Jerri Manthey's star was rising in Hollywood. (As proof, she's appearing in a production of the play "Lady Macbeth Gets a Divorce" at the Beverly Hills Playhouse.) After the piece, co-anchor Gretchen Carr read a teaser for Thursday night's "Survivor" finale.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
KCBS Channel 2 will use Super Bowl Sunday with its extraordinarily high viewer tune-in--to introduce former KABC news anchor Harold Greene as the lead co-anchor of its news team. Greene, an 18-year KABC veteran who departed last August following reports of a dispute with management, will first appear Jan. 28 on the 11 p.m. newscast following the Super Bowl and the premiere of the heavily hyped "Survivor: The Australian Outback."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN GREENE, HAROLD (NEWSCASTER)
The man who would be Jerry Dunphy won't deny that local television stations employ all kinds of chicanery and snake-oil sleight-of-hand to lure viewers into "the church" of TV news. But once they're there, he vows to do his darndest to give them "the news they need to know." Harold Greene, who stepped in as anchor of KABC Channel 7's 4, 6 and 6:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Harold Greene, anchor of the KCBS-TV 11 p.m. "news," who alerted me to the situation. This was Tuesday night, and "The Station of the People" had just finished a segment on how "Survivor" castoff Jerri Manthey's star was rising in Hollywood. (As proof, she's appearing in a production of the play "Lady Macbeth Gets a Divorce" at the Beverly Hills Playhouse.) After the piece, co-anchor Gretchen Carr read a teaser for Thursday night's "Survivor" finale.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2000 | GREG BRAXTON
Veteran KABC-TV Channel 7 "Eyewitness News" anchor Harold Greene has left the station after what sources say were disagreements with station management. Greene, who had been with KABC for 18 years, left Friday, station officials said. They declined to comment on the reason for his departure. Insiders said that Greene, who reportedly had been having difficulties with colleagues and management, was given a one-year contract last year. They said Greene left after a disagreement over his future.
NEWS
July 17, 1996
Harold Green, 74, inventor of the Comparator device for fingerprint identification. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from the College of the City of New York and a master's from Columbia University. In addition to the identification machine, Green also patented an easily removable canvas covering for battlefield stretchers and snap-on nylon webbing for repairing lawn furniture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2008 | Carla Rivera, Matea Gold and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles television news fixtures Harold Greene and Ann Martin will leave the anchor desks at KCBS-TV Channel 2 and KCAL-TV Channel 9 when their contracts expire in May, and about a dozen fellow staffers behind and in front of the camera have received pink slips at the sister CBS-affiliate stations. The layoffs were effective Monday and coincided with widespread layoffs at CBS affiliates nationwide, including San Francisco and New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
KCBS Channel 2 will use Super Bowl Sunday with its extraordinarily high viewer tune-in--to introduce former KABC news anchor Harold Greene as the lead co-anchor of its news team. Greene, an 18-year KABC veteran who departed last August following reports of a dispute with management, will first appear Jan. 28 on the 11 p.m. newscast following the Super Bowl and the premiere of the heavily hyped "Survivor: The Australian Outback."
BUSINESS
August 12, 2000 | GREG BRAXTON
Veteran KABC-TV Channel 7 "Eyewitness News" anchor Harold Greene has left the station after what sources say were disagreements with station management. Greene, who had been with KABC for 18 years, left Friday, station officials said. They declined to comment on the reason for his departure. Insiders said that Greene, who reportedly had been having difficulties with colleagues and management, was given a one-year contract last year. They said Greene left after a disagreement over his future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2000 | From The Washington Post
Harold H. Greene, the much-admired federal judge who came to this country as a refugee from Nazi Germany and presided over one of the most far-reaching cases in American history--the antitrust suit that broke up American Telephone & Telegraph Co.--died Saturday at his home in Washington. He was 76. Greene, who had retired from the bench, died of a cerebral hemorrhage.
OPINION
September 6, 1998 | Jube Shiver Jr., Jube Shiver Jr. covers telecommunications policy and regulation for The Times
The artifacts decorating the office of Judge Harold H. Greene do not seem to be those of the man who spent more than a decade supervising one of the largest antitrust cases in U.S. history: the 1984 breakup of AT&T. Greene, who says he remains amazed at how celebrated his showdown with Ma Bell has become, has filled his office with photos and memorabilia of his accomplishments before the AT&T case. Now, as a celebrated new antitrust trial, the United States vs. Microsoft Corp.
NEWS
July 17, 1996
Harold Green, 74, inventor of the Comparator device for fingerprint identification. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from the College of the City of New York and a master's from Columbia University. In addition to the identification machine, Green also patented an easily removable canvas covering for battlefield stretchers and snap-on nylon webbing for repairing lawn furniture.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN GREENE, HAROLD (NEWSCASTER)
The man who would be Jerry Dunphy won't deny that local television stations employ all kinds of chicanery and snake-oil sleight-of-hand to lure viewers into "the church" of TV news. But once they're there, he vows to do his darndest to give them "the news they need to know." Harold Greene, who stepped in as anchor of KABC Channel 7's 4, 6 and 6:30 p.m.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Baby Bells Seek Regulatory Relief: Four of the regional Bell telephone companies asked, as expected, U.S. District Judge Harold Greene to lift all restrictions imposed by the 1982 consent decree that broke up the Bell System. Bell Atlantic Corp., BellSouth Corp., Nynex Corp. and Southwestern Bell Corp. contend they should be allowed to enter the $70-billion long-distance market and make communications gear--activities the decree prohibits.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1987
The regional holding companies formed three years ago in the breakup of American Telephone & Telegraph urged U.S. District Judge Harold Greene to loosen regulatory constraints on what businesses they can enter besides providing local phone service. Zane E. Barnes, president of Southwestern Bell, said present restrictions are keeping "information age" benefits developed in this country--and enjoyed in France and Japan--from Americans.
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