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Harold H Greene

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BUSINESS
March 12, 1988 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
The federal judge who has presided over the reorganization of the U.S. telecommunications industry said Friday that strict controls must remain on the seven regional Bell telephone companies because they still are engaging in "anti-competitive" practices. But Judge Harold H. Greene also said the ruling he issued Monday, granting the so-called Baby Bells inroads into the business of transmitting information services, "greatly relieves restrictions" in that field.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court on Tuesday ordered a new look at the ban that keeps the seven independent Baby Bell telephone operating companies from selling electronic shopping and information services. Since the 1984 breakup of American Telephone & Telegraph Co., Baby Bells such as San Francisco-based Pacific Telesis have been barred from a potentially vast and lucrative market involving the sale of goods and information through computer terminals in homes and offices. U.S. District Judge Harold H.
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BUSINESS
February 6, 1988 | Associated Press
The federal judge who has overseen the breakup of American Telephone & Telegraph said Friday that lifting antitrust restrictions on the regional Bell telephone companies now would harm consumers and put many small companies out of business. U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene, whose decisions have shaped the U.S.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An angry federal judge excoriated the press Tuesday and confined the John M. Poindexter trial jury to a hotel at night after reporters contacted two jurors by phone. The Washington Post acknowledged that one of its reporters had contacted juror Leroy Witherspoon to try to set up a time when he could be interviewed after the trial.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court on Tuesday ordered a new look at the ban that keeps the seven independent Baby Bell telephone operating companies from selling electronic shopping and information services. Since the 1984 breakup of American Telephone & Telegraph Co., Baby Bells such as San Francisco-based Pacific Telesis have been barred from a potentially vast and lucrative market involving the sale of goods and information through computer terminals in homes and offices. U.S. District Judge Harold H.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An angry federal judge excoriated the press Tuesday and confined the John M. Poindexter trial jury to a hotel at night after reporters contacted two jurors by phone. The Washington Post acknowledged that one of its reporters had contacted juror Leroy Witherspoon to try to set up a time when he could be interviewed after the trial.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jurors Monday began to deliberate the guilt or innocence of John M. Poindexter, former President Ronald Reagan's national security adviser, after a federal judge instructed them to ignore the politics of the Iran-Contra affair in reaching their verdict. Deflating the defense's contention that the retired rear admiral was the target of a political vendetta by Reagan's opponents, U.S. District Judge Harold H.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Washington cleared the way Friday for American Telephone & Telegraph to move into electronic publishing, opening the door for a major new player to create and sell computer databases, videotext and other information services. U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene dropped his 7-year-old ban, effective Aug. 24, that limited AT&T's role in the fast-emerging information services business to transmitting data for others.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge denied a defense motion for a mistrial in the John M. Poindexter case Monday despite a lapse in which a prosecution witness blurted out unacceptable evidence on the witness stand. The trouble began as prosecutor Dan K. Webb was questioning Rep. Lee H. Hamilton (D-Ind.), the former chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, about a meeting that the committee had with Poindexter in November, 1986.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the first day that the Iran-Contra cases were assigned to him, U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene made clear that he planned to do things his way. As the numerous Iran-Contra cases were parceled out among judges here, most made a special point of clearing their calendars to give top priority to the highly publicized prosecutions. Not Greene. When the highly paid defense lawyers, the elite prosecutors on independent counsel Lawrence E.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jurors Monday began to deliberate the guilt or innocence of John M. Poindexter, former President Ronald Reagan's national security adviser, after a federal judge instructed them to ignore the politics of the Iran-Contra affair in reaching their verdict. Deflating the defense's contention that the retired rear admiral was the target of a political vendetta by Reagan's opponents, U.S. District Judge Harold H.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter smiles rarely and takes notes often at his Iran-Contra trial. Because he has not testified yet, the jury must rely a good deal on its mental snapshots of his image as he sits at a table opposite them every day. But that image poses a riddle. The balding retired rear admiral has grown a mustache since his days in the Ronald Reagan Administration as Oliver L. North's boss. When he takes off his glasses, the mustache softens his manner.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge denied a defense motion for a mistrial in the John M. Poindexter case Monday despite a lapse in which a prosecution witness blurted out unacceptable evidence on the witness stand. The trouble began as prosecutor Dan K. Webb was questioning Rep. Lee H. Hamilton (D-Ind.), the former chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, about a meeting that the committee had with Poindexter in November, 1986.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former White House aide Oliver L. North is expected to testify this morning in the Iran-Contra trial of John M. Poindexter, a day after the federal judge presiding over the case said that North lied under oath in pretrial proceedings. U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene said he had concluded that North was "prevaricating" at a hearing in the Poindexter case last December.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the first day that the Iran-Contra cases were assigned to him, U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene made clear that he planned to do things his way. As the numerous Iran-Contra cases were parceled out among judges here, most made a special point of clearing their calendars to give top priority to the highly publicized prosecutions. Not Greene. When the highly paid defense lawyers, the elite prosecutors on independent counsel Lawrence E.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Ronald Reagan testified behind closed doors for about six hours here Friday, facing some of the most detailed questions he has ever had to answer about his role in the Iran-Contra affair that rocked the closing years of his second term. Called as a defense witness by former White House National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter, Reagan's appearance was videotaped so his testimony can be scrubbed clean of any diplomatic and military secrets that may have been mentioned.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge said Thursday that he will consider former President Ronald Reagan's privacy but will ignore issues of diplomacy and national security in deciding whether to require Reagan to turn over excerpts from his White House diaries to Iran-Contra defendant John M. Poindexter. In a five-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Harold H.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Thursday barred the public and press from the Los Angeles courtroom where Ronald Reagan will testify today, but he ruled that the videotape of the testimony must be made public as soon as national security secrets are edited out. Judge Harold H. Greene thus rejected the demand of 12 news organizations for access to the session at which the former President will be questioned about the Iran-Contra case.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Thursday barred the public and press from the Los Angeles courtroom where Ronald Reagan will testify today, but he ruled that the videotape of the testimony must be made public as soon as national security secrets are edited out. Judge Harold H. Greene thus rejected the demand of 12 news organizations for access to the session at which the former President will be questioned about the Iran-Contra case.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Ronald Reagan, forgoing his right to claim executive privilege, agreed Friday to testify on videotape as a defense witness in John M. Poindexter's Iran-Contra trial. Reagan will be questioned under oath by Poindexter's lawyers and cross-examined by the Iran-Contra special counsel during the taping.
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