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Harold James Nicholson

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March 4, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former CIA case officer Harold James Nicholson pleaded guilty to spying for the Russians and agreed to tell federal investigators what secrets he gave away and to turn over all his property to the government. Nicholson, 46, the highest-ranking CIA employee to be caught spying, faces a maximum sentence of life in prison and a $250,000 fine. But he could get as little as 22 to 27 years if the government recommends that he get credit for cooperating with the CIA and FBI, U.S.
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NEWS
June 6, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highest-ranking CIA officer ever caught spying for a foreign country was sentenced Thursday to more than 23 years in prison after confessing he sold out the United States for money to give his children a better life after the collapse of his tumultuous marriage. Harold James Nicholson, a former CIA station chief overseas, appeared in federal court in Alexandria, Va., and apologized to his family for his actions.
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NEWS
June 6, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highest-ranking CIA officer ever caught spying for a foreign country was sentenced Thursday to more than 23 years in prison after confessing he sold out the United States for money to give his children a better life after the collapse of his tumultuous marriage. Harold James Nicholson, a former CIA station chief overseas, appeared in federal court in Alexandria, Va., and apologized to his family for his actions.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former CIA case officer Harold James Nicholson pleaded guilty to spying for the Russians and agreed to tell federal investigators what secrets he gave away and to turn over all his property to the government. Nicholson, 46, the highest-ranking CIA employee to be caught spying, faces a maximum sentence of life in prison and a $250,000 fine. But he could get as little as 22 to 27 years if the government recommends that he get credit for cooperating with the CIA and FBI, U.S.
NEWS
December 21, 1996 | From the Washington Post
Federal prosecutors said Friday they intend to place espionage suspect Harold James Nicholson in isolated confinement and may seek the death penalty against the former CIA case officer. The government raised the possibility of execution in a written brief to U.S. District Judge James C. Cacheris, arguing that Nicholson should not be released on bond. They wrote that "the United States is still reviewing numerous documents" to determine if his case warrants the death penalty.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accused CIA spy Harold James Nicholson, entering a formal plea of not guilty to charges of espionage, will face trial March 10, a federal judge ruled Wednesday. Before that date, however, Nicholson's court-appointed attorneys must be given security clearances to study hundreds of classified documents that could figure in his case. Because granting these clearances and access to sensitive records is a slow process, some legal experts said the March court date may have to be pushed back. U.S.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Robert Philip Hanssen, a 25-year veteran FBI agent, was indicted Wednesday on espionage charges. Federal prosecutors said the father of six "betrayed his country for over 15 years" and seriously compromised the security of the country. If convicted, he could be sentenced to death. The 57-page indictment handed up by a grand jury in Alexandria, Va.
NEWS
February 21, 2001
* George Trofimoff, a retired Army Reserve colonel, was arrested in Florida and charged last year with spying for the former Soviet Union and Russia for 25 years. He is the highest-ranking U.S. military officer ever charged with espionage. A civilian worker in Army intelligence in Germany, he allegedly was recruited into the KGB in 1969. He is accused of photographing U.S. documents and passed the film to KGB agents, and was later recruited into the KGB.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Central Intelligence Agency recently uncovered another suspected foreign spy in its midst but chose to handle the espionage case through administrative action and keep the matter secret, according to U.S. intelligence sources. CIA sources said the agency discovered that a contract employee working closely with its clandestine case officers apparently was providing information to a foreign intelligence service.
NEWS
December 20, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has won the Cold War. Now, slowly and methodically, it is collecting prisoners. When FBI agent Earl Edwin Pitts was arrested Wednesday and charged with spying for Moscow, he became the latest casualty of a continuing post-Cold War espionage sweep by America's spy hunters, sources said Thursday. The investigations have dragged on for years since communism's collapse, but U.S.
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that rocked the proud Federal Bureau of Investigation, the agency arrested one of its career supervisory agents Wednesday on charges that he sold government secrets to the former Soviet Union in the late 1980s and, more recently, to FBI undercover investigators. Earl Edwin Pitts, 43, became only the second agent in the bureau's 88-year history to face espionage charges. He is accused of providing information about fellow agents and boosting Soviet efforts to penetrate the bureau.
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | JAMES RISEN and PAUL RICHTER and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To the spy hunters at the FBI and CIA, the most frightening thing about Harold James Nicholson--CIA officer and alleged traitor--is that he was so very normal. Nicholson was no Aldrich H. Ames, and in a sense that is very bad news for the CIA. He was a senior officer on the rise within the Directorate of Operations, a man with a golden future as an American spy. Ames was a classic traitor: a drunkard and burnout case, a flunky who sold out his country after being spurned for advancement.
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